Coral

  1. Featured

    Zoas & Palys: A Kaleidoscope of Color

    Show me your favorite, your most coveted, your fastest and slowest growers. Label each picture so we all know what we are looking at and tell us how you keep them growing and looking beautiful!
  2. Corals and Their Behavior: A Hobbyist Perspective

    Although they do not swim, they are hunters, using stinging cells called nematocysts to capture and kill their prey. But in a sense they are also food gatherers as well, because in building the reef they cause upwelling, and in doing so gather up nutrients that would otherwise not be available. Most remarkably of all, they are farmers, cultivating photosynthetic organisms (zooxanthellae) that are typically single-celled algae called dinoflagellates in their tissues. Corals are also exhibit...
  3. Beginner Corals: Pulsing Xenia

    Xenia is a great starter coral, but should be added to your tank with caution. It’s ability to spread quickly can be a draw or allow it to smother out other, slower growing corals. If placed carefully, it’s possible to have xenia in your display without worrying that it will take over the whole tank.
  4. Can feeding alone make corals more adaptable?

    Researchers found that feeding gives the corals a backup way to build caloric energy. The nutrition provided during feeding goes directly to the coral colony and isn’t simply passed on by zooxanthellae. This energy can be directly put to use in building the skeleton and maintaining healthy tissue. It may also be able to aid the coral in mitigating the effects of higher nutrients and perhaps the coral can maintain vitality, even when zooxanthellae are growing faster than usual. For corals,...
  5. LC Blog: Leptos and Stylos, Let's Talk About Them!

    Hello reefers, So there's been a new type of coral that we've been collecting here at LC. Now this type of coral isn't as popular as say zoanthids, acroporas, or chalices. But oddly enough they still usually carry a high price tag. These corals have very thin layers of tissues that just encrust over rocks. Not sure if they're considered lps or sps, since they technically are small polyped but are fleshy like lps at times... You probably know what I'm talking about by now. Encrusters!!!...
  6. Favias, Favias, Favias... Underrated Beauties

    This Article is Sponsored by Legendary Corals. Hello reefers, Darwin here with another article. Mostly a story/ discussion as to what comes out of my reefing head. I haven't done a write up in a while and I was inspired to start this one up after seeing a couple of posts on Facebook coral groups. Excuse any grammer errors or thoughts going everywhere as I wrote this while waiting for my car at the dealership. This might strike you guys as odd as to why I'm not talking about zoas, but this...
  7. SPS Spotlight: Stylophora – Nice And Tough

    When I first started keeping SPS (small polyped stony) corals, I had done my research. Well, I thought I had, but as it turns out there is always more to learn and SPS corals are not all that forgiving when it comes to learning. It is for this very reason that most reputable retailers will advise that SPS corals are not for the beginning reef keeper. That’s good advice – corals can be expensive and SPS corals in particular can command some high prices. I don’t know too many reef hobbyists...
  8. SPS Spotlight: “Pearlberry” – Beautiful, Mysterious, And Finicky

    The Pearlberry is one of those corals that most people look at and think “It’s soooo beautiful – I’m going to try my hand at keeping SPS!” For sure, this is an inspiring coral – it is one of the most spectacular corals in our system, and we sure do love to stare at it. But as most SPS keepers know, the decision to move to the dark side and start keeping the “colored sticks” is not one to be taken lightly. SPS corals can be very demanding and frustrating; even with high-quality water...
  9. ZOA SPOTLIGHT: How The Speckled Krakatoa Got Its Name

    I don’t know about you, but I’ve always been curious about how some zoas get their names. There’s almost an art to picking one with a good ring to it. Trying to have the name, the pattern, the colors of the zoa collide and become something special. Utter Chaos, Flaming Mohican, Krakatoa. I can’t say for sure on the previous mentioned polyps (actually I can on the Krakatoa, but that’s another story), but I was involved in the naming of one particular polyp, and it goes a little somethin’...
  10. Acropora Secale: The Buff Beauty

    Acropora secale is buff. It works out. Not like a “10 minutes on the treadmill” kind of work out, either. This coral is one of the most dense that I have ever kept in my system. It is a high-energy, high-output kind of coral. It obviously loves to consume high amounts of calcium and other ions essential for building its really heavy and thick skeleton. Likewise, it loves high-intensity light and wave action. Like Acropora humilis, A. secale is one of the heavyweights of the reef builders....
  11. SPS Spotlight: Mistaken Identity – Acropora tortuosa and Its Imposters

    Tortuosa are an especially interesting species of Acropora. As SPS lovers have come to know, the variety of color and growth forms in this group of corals perpetually attracts the interest of reef-aquarium hobbyists. Many environmental parameters affect a coral’s coloration; most notably light intensity and spectrum. Acropora tortuosa certainly stands out in its wide range of coloration. There are green, blue, yellow, even pale blue/white and several variants in between. As mentioned in my...
  12. A Zoanthid Interview: James Davis Reimer

    The students and staff at Nova Southeastern University (NSU) Oceanographic Center (OC), Dania Beach, FL, are engaged in several studies of marine life. For example, they are conducting studies on issues such as the invasive lion fish and how to eradicate them and Florida hard corals, why they’re dying, and ways to replant them in our ocean. In 2014, I was asked to help some students with some tests they were doing to determine why zoanthids were dying. As part of that effort, I did...
  13. Shrooms, The Latest Hot Trend???

    This Article is Sponsored by Legendary Corals. Hello fellow reefers, Darwin here with another blog like story time post! I've been talking about this subject with a couple of friends and it's very noticeable that the demand for these squishies has skyrocketed in the past couple of years. Some people even make it a mission to collect every new piece that comes out now (or even some people who make a vow to collect all the nicest jawbreakers out there *cough cough*). But it wasn't always like...
  14. Explanation on How Zoas Get Their Names

    This Article is Sponsored by Legendary Corals. Hello fellow reefers! I was trolling the zoanthids section of this forum (as usual) and ran across a very interesting topic, asking what does a zoa name really mean (it was interesting because the reefer is a researcher interested in genetics and wanted to see if all zoas were lineaged back to one name)? To save him the trouble I wrote a brief explanation... That got a bit longer with a 1st edit.. and then longer with a 2nd... and then a 3rd......
  15. SPS Spotlight: Mo Flo – The Beautiful Acropora Efflorescens

    This month, I present another thickly growing SPS, the beautiful A. efflorescens. The “efflo” as is frequently called in the aquarium trade, is a plating coral that is rare by SPS standards, growing natively mainly in the North Indian Ocean and indo-Pacific in a range that wraps around Indonesia, Malaysia, and the southern tip of India around Sri Lanka. While similar in overall shape to A. branchi and A. clathrata, Efflo’s have a very distinctive growth pattern, forming massive plates with...
  16. Easy, Breezy, Beautiful…Euphyllia

    The genus Euphyllia contains some of the most spectacular and recognizable corals we’ve come to love in the marine aquarium hobby. They fall under the hobby coined term, “LPS”, or Large Polyp Stony corals. While the term LPS can shed some light on their overall care, all corals should be looked at closer than that in order to determine if they’re a good fit for your aquarium.
  17. Zoa Spotlight: Fruit Loops!

    This month’s zoa spotlight will feature the “Fruit loops” zoanthid. These tiny zoas are in almost everyone’s top 10 most wanted zoas list. They are also in most people’s top ten want, but can’t have (because they are notorious for melting away) list. I will shed some light on a common misconception often attached to these beauties to give you a better understanding of placement and flow so you can be more successful with them in the future. I spoke with Andrea Stockhausen (a local...
  18. Going deeper- some observations about "deepwater" Acropora

    We all love Acros! That’s not even like an opinion. It’s a fact…You just do, and if you don’t, you’re lying. End of discussion. Yup. That being said, we sell, and people seem to ask for, lots and lots of “deepwater” Acropora. What is it about them? Their smooth skin, unusual shape, cool colors- or something else? Maybe, the allure of the term “deepwater”, which evokes the mysterious… Anyways, since we deal with so many of them, let’s look at a few facts about their care that we’ve...
  19. Unravelling the challenges of Scolymia

    Believe it or not, one of my favorite corals is Scolymia. Yup, that’s right, the “Scoly!” I used to look at them as high-priced “doorstops”, with little to hold my interest: I mean, they don’t “branch”, they don’t wave around in the current, and they don’t encrust like other corals. And, they are surrounded by some of the same garbage-hype and pricing absurdity that I detest about Chalices and Acans...Yuck. You know how I feel about that stuff. However, over time, I found a lot of things...
  20. HOW2TEST: Coral Compatibility

    We have all had a coral or two try to kill its neighbor. The main cause for this is territorial, but some corals just kill nearby corals because they can. Some simply reach out and sting while others can pump out toxins that can do more than enough to clear their bubble. Some can even nuke a whole tank if the coral is large enough, or the tank is small enough for that matter. Even some corals of the same genus may feel threatened by their neighboring relative. Last but not least, some corals...
  21. Symphyllia Symphony!

    There are tons of variations of most types of coral. The Symphyllia coral is no exception. It has a great reputation for being an easy coral so almost anyone can be successful with one. Low to moderate flow is best for these beauties. They are found at varied depths, so the best way to determine lighting is to start the coral at the sand bed and slowly move it around until it looks good to you. They are naturally nocturnal, but like most corals can be trained to come out in the day to feed....
  22. GRAFTING CORALS: The Art Of Coral Grafting

    The art of coral grafting is very risky. It involves fragging corals, which if you have any knowledge on that know it can come with some dangers. They can contain toxins that could potentially kill someone. With proper safety you can cut any fraggable coral with confidence. Once you become a skilled frag master you can start to experiment with the pieces. Let me clear up the notion that grafting corals is the same as grafting trees. A coral will not be genetically altered, it wont grow weird...
  23. The Captain America Palythoa (paly)

    These corals are not here to lead the country, they are here to serve it. Captain America Palythoas are a comic book nerd’s dream coral, well one of them. The coral resembles Captain America’s famous red, white, and blue shield. Due to varying circumstances in individual aquarium, the color scheme may be morphed to a green hue or the red may turn pink. The one thing that stays as true as the superhero is the pattern of the colors themselves. image via reef2reef member @Nanofins You do...
  24. What about the Merulina Coral?

    Are you into rare corals but also like preserving life in the ocean? The Merulina coral, also known as Lettuce, Cabbage, Ridge, or Ruffled Coral, may just be your ticket to preservation! Some species of Merulina coral fall within the Marine Protected Areas. Growing these corals in captivity to study is the only way we can help them stay on our planet and not get lost in the reef. If you have a knack for SPS and want to do your part for science you will love this coral. image via reef2reef...
  25. How to love your Lobo: Tips for success with Lobophyllia

    Have you ever kept a Lobophyllia? These are great "LPS" corals with terrific color patterns and shapes that look great in reefs! If you're like a lot of reefers, you may have kept one before, and either had moderate success, or perhaps had a bad experience. Was thinking about this the other day, because we work with a lot of Lobos, and seem to enjoy much success with them, as do most of our customers who purchase them. it made me think about what the keys to success are with Lobos. I decided...
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