LPS Corals

  1. Favias, Favias, Favias... Underrated Beauties

    This Article is Sponsored by Legendary Corals. Hello reefers, Darwin here with another article. Mostly a story/ discussion as to what comes out of my reefing head. I haven't done a write up in a while and I was inspired to start this one up after seeing a couple of posts on Facebook coral groups. Excuse any grammer errors or thoughts going everywhere as I wrote this while waiting for my car at the dealership. This might strike you guys as odd as to why I'm not talking about zoas, but this...
  2. Easy, Breezy, Beautiful…Euphyllia

    The genus Euphyllia contains some of the most spectacular and recognizable corals we’ve come to love in the marine aquarium hobby. They fall under the hobby coined term, “LPS”, or Large Polyp Stony corals. While the term LPS can shed some light on their overall care, all corals should be looked at closer than that in order to determine if they’re a good fit for your aquarium.
  3. How to take care of your Brain! (Trachys, Lobos, etc...)

    Okay, we spend absurdly large amounts of time talking about Acropora and their care around here, don’t we? I know it seems crazy, but there are actually some other corals in the ocean that are interesting and colorful. Really. I’m serious. Enter the “Brain Corals” (my spell checker wanted to call them “Bran” Corals…kind of goofy, huh?). These corals get their creepy common name from the grooves and channels on their surfaces that look like the folds of the human brain. Man- if there has...
  4. Chalice Corals- looking beyond the "hype zone"

    Okay, all you tortilla chip lovers- this one’s for you! R2R's L'enfant terrible (moi) is back- uncaffeinated yet rearing to go... Obviously, this is not the first time I’ve written about the Chalice Corals, but I find many aspects of them fascinating…really- so they deserve more ink (or is that, pixels, or…whatever?). Trendiness in the hobby often confuses and amuses me, as you know if you read my ramblings and follow my MACNA talks. A case in point is the so-called “Chalice corals” or...
  5. Unravelling the challenges of Scolymia

    Believe it or not, one of my favorite corals is Scolymia. Yup, that’s right, the “Scoly!” I used to look at them as high-priced “doorstops”, with little to hold my interest: I mean, they don’t “branch”, they don’t wave around in the current, and they don’t encrust like other corals. And, they are surrounded by some of the same garbage-hype and pricing absurdity that I detest about Chalices and Acans...Yuck. You know how I feel about that stuff. However, over time, I found a lot of things...
  6. Symphyllia Symphony!

    There are tons of variations of most types of coral. The Symphyllia coral is no exception. It has a great reputation for being an easy coral so almost anyone can be successful with one. Low to moderate flow is best for these beauties. They are found at varied depths, so the best way to determine lighting is to start the coral at the sand bed and slowly move it around until it looks good to you. They are naturally nocturnal, but like most corals can be trained to come out in the day to feed....
  7. How to love your Lobo: Tips for success with Lobophyllia

    Have you ever kept a Lobophyllia? These are great "LPS" corals with terrific color patterns and shapes that look great in reefs! If you're like a lot of reefers, you may have kept one before, and either had moderate success, or perhaps had a bad experience. Was thinking about this the other day, because we work with a lot of Lobos, and seem to enjoy much success with them, as do most of our customers who purchase them. it made me think about what the keys to success are with Lobos. I decided...
  8. Goniopora Or Goner-oh-poo? The Flower Pot Coral

    This is one amazingly hard to keep coral. If you are one of the few who have made it longer than a year than you are truly a supreme reefer. These are known as one of the hardest corals to keep alive…period. Generally these corals die within the first 6-12 months of captivity, but are still available across the nation to even the most beginner of hobbyist.
  9. Oulophyllia Coral - Moon, Moonstone Coral

    Oulophyllia, although available in the hobby trade, is quite often mislabeled due to its resemblance to other types of Brain corals and may therefore not be offered for sale under its proper name. Due to its overall difference in shape though identification should not be all that difficult, but because it is not a widely available one many wholesalers and stores may not research its correct ID and just sell it as a Brain Coral without giving a scientific name to the coral. It is a large...
  10. Acanthophyllia Coral for the Nano Reef

    Acanthophyllia deshayesiana © Albert J. Thiel This is perhaps not the most commonly available coral, and it is often confused with Scolymia vitiensis, as they look quite similar, and sometimes even with Cynarina lacrimalis, but it certainly is a very nice addition for your Nano-Reef if you can find a nice specimen such as, for instance, the one below: Acanthophyllia deshayesiana © aquaportail Note that although confusion with other similar looking corals is possible and exists, even...
  11. Care of Large Polyp Non-Photosynthetic Corals

    This is a brief description in "Laymans Terms" of how to feed and keep large polyp non-photosynthetic corals (NPS coral). I see countless threads and questions regarding "how to feed my new sun coral", or "how do I get the polyps on my new sun coral to open?" They're honestly a relatively easy coral to keep, some just require a little TLC. The following process can be followed for any large polyp non-photosynthetic coral Genus, such as Tubastrea ("Sun Coral"), Dendrophyllia ("Dendros"),...
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