Saltwater Fish

  1. Emperor Angel Journey from Juvenile to Adult

    The emperor angelfish (Pomacanthus imperator) is the most well-known angel fish in the aquarium industry, With striking colors, bold body, combined with personality and an attitude, It is not only me but also many other hobbyist consider it the most beautiful fish. It is readily available and relatively hardy fish and will thrive in most aquariums given certain requirements of nutrition, water quality and space.
  2. Venustus Angelfish (Paracentropyge venusta)| Fish Spotlight

    The Venustus Angelfish or Purple Masked Angelfish, or Paracentropyge venusta, is one of the rare fish species, but it is becoming more available recently in the aquarium fish industry. It is expert only fish, reef safe with caution. In my tank, it rarely nip on Acropora corals. But leave other corals and clams alone.
  3. Raising the Komahara blenny

    Fang blennies are perfect for reef tanks. They can be kept in harems, or individually. This article documents the early life stages of the Komahara blenny.
  4. Captive breeding of the Bellus angelfish

    A short summary of our work on the bellus angelfish. Enjoy and please make a comment!
  5. Species Spotlight: Pseudocheilinops ataenia – The Pink-Streaked Wrasse

    Pseudocheilinops ataenia, better known to most hobbyists as the Pink-Streaked Wrasse, is a very suitable wrasse for nano aquariums and gets along with most fish, as long as they are not too aggressive themselves. Feel free to add your own experiences with this inquisitive little fish in the discussion after you are done reading the species spotlight!
  6. Are Captive Bred Fishes The Only Way?

    Nowadays it’s not uncommon to see a hobbyist say, ‘I’m only stocking my tank with captive bred fish.’ Of course, their heart is in the right place, and it’s understandable why most people would think this is the best route forward for wild reefs. But is it? Is captive breeding the only way?
  7. Hunter Hammond: A “Fairy” Inclusive Look at Keeping & Mixing Cirrhilabrus Wrasses | MACNA 2017

    If you have ever wanted to keep or really learn about Fairy Wrasses then you have to watch this talk from one of our R2R experts from MACNA! Here's a great talk about keeping and mixing various Cirrhilabrus Wrasses from Hunter Hammond.
  8. Captive Bred Candy Basslets are Ready for Your Tank!

    Well guys, I’m excited to share some amazing news with everyone. We here at Among The Reef have captive bred Candy Basslets (Liopropoma carmabi) in stock, bred by the Karen Brittain herself! These special little guys were born on New Year’s Day, and are finally available from us.
  9. Cirrhilabrus Complexes: Inferiority Need Not Apply (1st Revision)

    Cirrhilabrus, the “Fairy Wrasses”, are one of the most elegant, active, and colorful reef fish. Their appeal in a reef tank is common to many, but not all have a well-rounded understanding of the compatibility amongst them. Enter the notion of “complexes”: groupings of very closely related species within a genus.
  10. Keeping Seahorses in Aquaria #6 - Dealing with Travel and Sickness

    Our previous article on Keeping Seahorses in Aquaria focused on how to feed and nourish your ponies. This, our final article in this series, will address how to deal with time away due to travel and also how to handle disease and sickness in your herd.
  11. Keeping Seahorses in Aquaria #5 - Feeding Your Ponies

    Another aspect of keeping your herd happy and healthy is feeding them properly and well. Certainly one way to a seahorse’s heart is through its stomach! This is a time to really enjoy your ponies. As their owner, you get the experience of interacting with them at feeding time. It is an excellent opportunity for you to inspect each pony and determine its health and behavior patterns. Seahorses quickly learn that the appearance of their owners usually means yummy things to eat will soon...
  12. Keeping Seahorses in Aquaria #4 - Selecting Your Ponies

    In our previous article on Keeping Seahorses in Aquaria, we looked at options for stocking your seahorse tank with everything other than the ponies themselves. In this article, we'll look at actually selecting your ponies and how to keep them happy and healthy.
  13. Keeping Seahorses in Aquaria #3 - Stocking Your Seahorse Tank: What to Add Other Than the Ponies

    In our previous article on Keeping Seahorses in Aquaria, we examined the process of aquascaping and achieving the excellent water quality. In this third article of our 6-part series, we will explore options for stocking your seahorse tank (looking at options other than the ponies themselves). This will include things like CUC (clean-up crew), corals, macroalgaes, fish, and other livestock.
  14. Keeping Seahorses in Aquaria #2 - Aquascaping and Providing Excellent Water Quality

    In our first article on Keeping Seahorses in Aquaria, we looked at an introduction to seahorses and setting up a seahorse tank. In this second article of our 6-part series, we will examine the process of aquascaping and achieving the excellent water quality which is so crucial to maintaining the health of our ponies.
  15. Keeping Seahorses in Aquaria #1 - Introduction and Setting Up Your Seahorse Tank

    This article is the first in a 6-part series that is designed to help those of you who already have the knowledge and ability to keep marine life in an aquarium, but want to learn the particulars of keeping greater seahorses. Five years ago, I was in the place you are now. I was interested in setting up a tank for greater seahorses and was trying to learn how to do that. The information is available but it can be scattered here, there, and everywhere. It is my hope that this article along...
  16. Fish Spotlight: Anthias

    A group of anthias can add lots of color and movement to a display tank that is large enough to accommodate them. Keeping them in twos is a bad idea for the poor female in that duo. A good qt protocol is absolutely important and feeding can be difficult at first. Be prepared when you buy your first group of anthias and you’ll have a group of beautiful fish for years to come.
  17. Picking Your Clownfish

    This article isn’t about what it takes to keep a clownfish, but more about what to expect from your clowns when picking them out, pairing up, and beyond. The temperament, size, pairing, willingness to host will all play an important role in how your clownfish will fit into your tank’s dynamic. Choose carefully, because once you have a pair they can live for upwards of 20 years if taken care of properly.
  18. Pipefish

    I would like to discuss one of my favorite fish, the pipefish. Pipefish to me are so much different from normal fishy looking fish that I can't help but to love them. There are more things different in pipefish than similar to normal looking fish. They are so different that at one time, in the 1800s pipefish were considered to be insects instead of fish. They probably got that idea because they have an external skeleton composed of bony plates instead of scales so when you pick one up, it...
  19. Gupp-tastrophe: My misguided run at feeder fish breeding

    I decided it was time for a large "predator" type fish. After some research I decided a comet fish / marine beta was the correct choice for my reef. They look pretty sweet - have an 'eel eye' type spot on their tail, they're meticulous hunters, and have a good rep as far as messing with cleaners - except shrimp...my coral banded shrimp got disarmed when he tried to give him Mr. Comet a pinch. They were bffs after that. Suspect they just needed to establish some boundaries and the arm...
  20. How To Plan a Livestock List

    The very best way to select the fish you will keep in your tank is to start well before you even purchase a tank. Wait. What? I don’t even have a tank yet and you want me to start selecting fish?! Quite simply, yes I do. In this hobby, a very good portion of the fish we keep require special needs for their care. The biggest of which is ROOM. Room to swim, to exercise, to call territory. Tangs are among the most popular fish to keep in the saltwater world and they need lots of room to swim....
  21. Keeping The Mysterious Moorish Idol

    Moorish Idols. Impossible to keep. Better left in the wild, right? Anyone that has been in this hobby for nearly any length of time has read things like this or can at least recognize this iconic fish. Many of us grew up seeing this majestic fish in photos and documentaries. Whether seen schooling in Hawaii or casted as "Gill", the wise Moorish Idol from the beloved Disney Pixar film "Finding Nemo", this fish is quite desirable in the hobby. Sadly, The vast majority of these fish do not...
  22. All About Reef Safe Wrasses in Aquaria

    Below, you will find sections about: these guidelines, wrasses which qualify as reef safe, the general requirements, feeding, shipping, quarantine, adding new wrasses to your system, mixing species and genera, the acclimation box, protogynous hermaphroditism & sexual dichromatism, “pairing” wrasses & harems, pricing and rarity, a section about each genus (Anampses, Cirrhilabrus, Halichoeres, Labroides, Macropharyngodon, Paracheilinus, Pseudocheilinus, Pseudocheilinops, Pseudojuloides, and...
  23. Fish Shopping 101: Tips to Buying a Healthy Fish

    Buying a new fish for your aquarium can be both an exciting and nerve-racking experience. Is this fish healthy? Is this fish a good fit for my aquarium? If I get this fish, am I sacrificing another fish down the line? These are a few of the many questions that may pop into your head, and are all very important and relevant. When choosing a new addition for your aquarium, you should consider many things. Here are a few things to consider and look for when choosing the next fish for your...
  24. How behaviorally complex are marine fish?

    Today however, advances in ethology (the science of animal behavior), sociobiology (the scientific theory that states behavior is a result of evolution), neurobiology (the application of biological principles to the study of developmental mechanisms) and ecology, scientists have a much clearer picture of both the behavior but also the conscious processes of fish.
  25. Seahorse Tankmates Guide - Part I: Fish

    * this is for "regular-sized" seahorses only and cannot be used in determining tankmates for Dwarf Seahorses. 0 Risk Rating no aggressive tendencies no food competition (*) mostly benthic/cryptic and keep to themselves 1 Risk Rating no aggressive tendencies minimal food competition mostly in water column, but does not have a fast/erratic swimming pattern 2 Risk Rating no aggressive tendencies minimal food competition mostly in water column and has fast or erratic swimming pattern 3...
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