Pseudojuloides Atavai

Common name(s):
Polynesian sunset wrasse, Polynesian pencil wrasse, sunset wrasse
Genus:
Pseudojuloides
Species (if known):
atavai
Origins/Lineage:
Polynesia
Difficulty Level:
Difficult
Temperament:
Mild
Coral Safe:
Yes
Mobile invert safe?:
Yes
Feeding behavior:
Both Substrate & Water Column
Maximum Size:
4"
Minimum tank size recommended:
75g
Minimum tank length recommended (if applicable):
Three Foot
Covered tank required?:
Yes for all Wrasse
Sand required?:
Yes
Sexually dichromatic?:
Yes
Compatible with other wrasses?:
Yes
Predominant body color(s) and pattern if applicable:
Males, orange and yellow head and body turning darher towards the back half; females red from top half of nose to back of dorsal, bottom half white, black and blue median line.
Dorsal fin color(s) and pattern if applicable:
male yellow with 2 black spots on anterior dorsal rays; females opaque or light red depending on maturity with 2 black dots on the anterior dorsal rays.
Number of dorsal filaments (if applicable):
n/a
Ventral (pelvic) fin color(s) and pattern if applicable:
males yellow; females white
Anal fin color(s) and pattern if applicable:
males yellow; females white
Caudal (tail) color(s) and pattern if applicable:
males dark yellow with a forked pattern; females opaque or white depending on maturity
  • Pseudojuloides atavai is a very peaceful reef safe wrasse. It is not often offered for sale and commands a high price when it is available.

    Specimens do not handle shipping well, though females generally recover quicker than males.

    When first acquired it will benefit from a noncompetitive environment, but once acclimated to aquarium life are fairly hardy.

    Pseudojuloides atavai females have unique pattern and coloration from other Pseudojuloides females, which are usually predominantly pink.

    Pseudojuloides wrasses are also one of the few variety of wrasses that will benefit from having a male with a harem of females, as they are much more tolerant of conspecifics than most other wrasses.

    Males may lose their vibrant coloring if kept with other male sand burying wrasses.
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