3d Printed Aquarium Parts Archive Thread

Reef AquaCult

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Hi all,

I heard that the 'ender 3' is a good starting point. Does anybody have any other recommendation for a beginners 3D printer?

Thanks,
I like the Creality CR-10S Pro. Good build size, awesome stepper motors. Great print quality, great price. I use a flexible bed upgrade to make part removal super easy which is highly recommended.
 

TheHarold

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Hi all,

I heard that the 'ender 3' is a good starting point. Does anybody have any other recommendation for a beginners 3D printer?

Thanks,
Depends what you mean by starting point. An Ender 3 will also require a lot of tinkering and a few modifications to get performing well. I think the upcoming Prusa Mini will be an unbelievable value, with SWEET high tech features and better quality than the rest.
 
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ludnix

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Hi all,

I heard that the 'ender 3' is a good starting point. Does anybody have any other recommendation for a beginners 3D printer?

Thanks,
I would suggest looking at the new prusa brand mini printer they put out that in a similar price range. It's not much smaller than it's big brother the original prusa, but it's a much easier to enter price point.

 
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ludnix

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Ok so what filament should I be using. ABS or PLA?
I am going with ABS for wet products and PLA for dry. Equipment mounts and other items are great in PLA but for longevity of the part I use ABS when it's going to be wet. PLA will still last for years in the reef tank but I'd prefer to minimize potential pollutants where possible. There's a thread on the "reef safe" filaments, there seems to be a lot of people reporting success with a variety of filaments and brands.



That said, ABS is tricky to print without an enclosure so I don't recommend it right off the bat for beginners to 3d printing. ABS is very temperature sensitive and is prone to warping without the right conditions for the printer.
 

captrichc

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I am going with ABS for wet products and PLA for dry. Equipment mounts and other items are great in PLA but for longevity of the part I use ABS when it's going to be wet. PLA will still last for years in the reef tank but I'd prefer to minimize potential pollutants where possible. There's a thread on the "reef safe" filaments, there seems to be a lot of people reporting success with a variety of filaments and brands.



That said, ABS is tricky to print without an enclosure so I don't recommend it right off the bat for beginners to 3d printing. ABS is very temperature sensitive and is prone to warping without the right conditions for the printer.
Thankyou very much. I just ordered a 6.6lb spool of PLA. Will make some upgrades for the ender, making 1in locline for my returns, and my kid wants a toy lol. Any idea how to make multiple piece on the bed at the same time? Or does that have to be written in the original file?
 
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ludnix

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Thankyou very much. I just ordered a 6.6lb spool of PLA. Will make some upgrades for the ender, making 1in locline for my returns, and my kid wants a toy lol. Any idea how to make multiple piece on the bed at the same time? Or does that have to be written in the original file?
Just checking the 6.6lb filament is 1.75mm diameter and not the larger 3.0mm? I just often see the larger weight spools in the larger diameter filament and don't want you to be disappointed. 3.0mm filament will not fit in an Ender.

When you're slicing the 3d models you download or make, you can use your slicing software to place multiple models on your virtual print bed. In my case, I use CURA, and you can just keep opening models or drag them into CURA to place them in the build area. For what it's worth it actually takes more time to print several of one object at once rather than doing it sequentially. This is because the printer has to travel between each object for every single layer. If you're doing small parts and need several it makes sense to do them all at once, but if you're going to be near the printer during the prints it might be better to them sequentially. When I print my peg board mounts I print a whole bunch at once because I don't want to visit the printer every 30 minutes but on larger projects that take 8 hours it's better to do them separately even if I can fit 2 at a time.
 

dantimdad

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The mini prusa is awesome looking but, I print quite a bit of stuff that's too big for it. :(

I might get one to use along side my three ender 3s for little parts.
 

captrichc

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Just checking the 6.6lb filament is 1.75mm diameter and not the larger 3.0mm? I just often see the larger weight spools in the larger diameter filament and don't want you to be disappointed. 3.0mm filament will not fit in an Ender.

When you're slicing the 3d models you download or make, you can use your slicing software to place multiple models on your virtual print bed. In my case, I use CURA, and you can just keep opening models or drag them into CURA to place them in the build area. For what it's worth it actually takes more time to print several of one object at once rather than doing it sequentially. This is because the printer has to travel between each object for every single layer. If you're doing small parts and need several it makes sense to do them all at once, but if you're going to be near the printer during the prints it might be better to them sequentially. When I print my peg board mounts I print a whole bunch at once because I don't want to visit the printer every 30 minutes but on larger projects that take 8 hours it's better to do them separately even if I can fit 2 at a time.
Thankyou so much for the info. Can please explain what you mean by slicing. Still very new to 3d printing
 
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ludnix

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Sure, the 3d printer works by making the parts one layer at a time. It does this so it never has a chance to accidentally bump into the part with the actual print head moving around. In order to get the machine to work it needs a set of GCODE instructions to tell the printer how to move the extruder head around where to put the plastic down.
external-content.duckduckgo.com.gif


Slicing is the process of writing a GCODE file for the printer to use.

The virtual representation of the objects we make are called 3d models. These usually have the file formats of .STL, .3MF, .OBJ and literally hundreds of other formats. You can download a .STL file here from this thread off the repository website thingiverse.com but we still have to get the printer to use that to make the real version. We all have different printers, plastics and expectations from our prints so the 3d models are 3d printer agnostic. Slicing software lets us make a file that knows what 3d model you want to use, where you want it positioned on the print bed, and how high of resolution of the print you want. Once you tell your slicing software what kind of printer you have, what model to print and what quality you want it will proceed to slice it into layers for the printer.

In short the slicing software is the software that runs the 3d printer. It slices the models we give it into hundreds of plastic layers that when stacked look like the 3d object we are trying to make.

cura.JPG


The layers are exaggerated in this photo but it shows how the model is "sliced" into the plastic layers that make the object, in this case a cylinder light shade. These layers are 2mm high but normally I would print around 0.2mm height at most normally.
 

captrichc

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Sure, the 3d printer works by making the parts one layer at a time. It does this so it never has a chance to accidentally bump into the part with the actual print head moving around. In order to get the machine to work it needs a set of GCODE instructions to tell the printer how to move the extruder head around where to put the plastic down.
external-content.duckduckgo.com.gif


Slicing is the process of writing a GCODE file for the printer to use.

The virtual representation of the objects we make are called 3d models. These usually have the file formats of .STL, .3MF, .OBJ and literally hundreds of other formats. You can download a .STL file here from this thread off the repository website thingiverse.com but we still have to get the printer to use that to make the real version. We all have different printers, plastics and expectations from our prints so the 3d models are 3d printer agnostic. Slicing software lets us make a file that knows what 3d model you want to use, where you want it positioned on the print bed, and how high of resolution of the print you want. Once you tell your slicing software what kind of printer you have, what model to print and what quality you want it will proceed to slice it into layers for the printer.

In short the slicing software is the software that runs the 3d printer. It slices the models we give it into hundreds of plastic layers that when stacked look like the 3d object we are trying to make.

cura.JPG


The layers are exaggerated in this photo but it shows how the model is "sliced" into the plastic layers that make the object, in this case a cylinder light shade. These layers are 2mm high but normally I would print around 0.2mm height at most normally.
Amazing explanation. Thankyou.
 

ss30

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Just a little tip on saving filament and time.
I made a 100mm square box to use as a Pod Hotel and printed it with Gyroid infill at 10% and no sides so you just end up with a cube of the infill and I have tried to squash this between my hands and knees and I can't it's strong.

I just looked at how much filament this would use(Gyroid 10%) and it was 65 meters I then changed it to Grid 30% and it would use just under 150 meters.
So 10% Gyroid is very strong and will save filament also it was a good 5hrs quicker to print according to PrusaSlicer.
 
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