Algae Control Identification and Help

harsha22

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I have 2 month old 35 gallon tank with 5 fishes and 2 corals. Nitrate is around 2. Haven't checked phosphates. Started noticing this greenish brown algae on my rocks. I am guessing it is the "Ugly phase" of my tank. I am treating the tank with a daily dose of Brightwell Aquatics Clean and Bio Reef fuel. I don't have a skimmer. I do have UV.
Should I fight it with Brightwell aquatics razor or red slime or chemiclean or anything similar?

Also my parameters are low but still it looks the water is slightly yellowish. Is there anyway to treat that?

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Erin1971Texas

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Please just slow down!
First, not at all an emergency. That tag is used for when someone needs help immediately to try to keep a fish from dying, etc.
Second, you've made quite a few posts about different "problems" that are simply the things that happen with a new tank.
Don't expect a saltwater aquarium to look "great" until it's a year old, and then you'll be pleasantly surprised if it stabilizes sooner than that.
You WILL get algae. ALL KINDS of algae. The tank has to mature and go through multiple cycles -- the nitrogen cycle that makes the water safe for fish and inverts is just the beginning.

You're welcome to throw every chemical/product you want into your tank in an attempt to avoid the natural process, but will literally just be throwing money away.

Slow down and enjoy and learn from the experience. Nothing good happens fast in this hobby.

Cheers!
 

Erin1971Texas

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One more thing, which I believe others have said in your previous threads.
At this point, you should not need to add any of the products that you're using. Feed your fish, perform regular maintenance, test as often as you like but only to learn about your tank and build good habits. Water changes will provide your tank with what it needs right now.
Don't be tempted to try the "no water change" method... It's not even really a 'method', but something that some can accomplish with a lot of experience and, usually, a tank that's had VERY stable parameters for a long period of time. A 2 month old tank in no way meets these requirements.

Again, weekly or every other week water changes (10-15% unless you rely need to correct something) will allow the tank to begin to balance and let the bacteria, algae, etc, stabilize and progress through these early stages.
 
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This is a very mild amount of algae and nothing to worry about. If cyano smothers the tank, then go for chemiclean. At this point, I would just blow it off and make sure to get a quality phosphate test.


Do not use bio reef fuel. That would make things worse.
 
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harsha22

harsha22

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This is a very mild amount of algae and nothing to worry about. If cyano smothers the tank, then go for chemiclean. At this point, I would just blow it off and make sure to get a quality phosphate test.


Do not use bio reef fuel. That would make things worse.
Taking your advise. But curious why you ask me not to dose bioreef fuel. It does control nitrates by carbon dosing and if I add the regular amounts of less than 5ml a day as said in the bottle for good reef keeping, it is considered safe right?
 
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Taking your advise. But curious why you ask me not to dose bioreef fuel. It does control nitrates by carbon dosing and if I add the regular amounts of less than 5ml a day as said in the bottle for good reef keeping, it is considered safe right?
Because as others have already advised you, that you shouldn't be dosing anything in a 2 month old tank. Weekly water changes are all that is needed but feel free to follow your own path and we will look forward to your next emergency.
 

Erin1971Texas

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Taking your advise. But curious why you ask me not to dose bioreef fuel. It does control nitrates by carbon dosing and if I add the regular amounts of less than 5ml a day as said in the bottle for good reef keeping, it is considered safe right?
Water changes are your best course of action for reducing nitrates in a 2 month old tank (or even a 6, 8, 10 month old tank...)

Edit: and you said your nitrates are at 2!! In what universe does that level require reduction?
 
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harsha22

harsha22

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Because as others have already advised you, that you shouldn't be dosing anything in a 2 month old tank. Weekly water changes are all that is needed but feel free to follow your own path and we will look forward to your next emergency.
I should stop watching BRStv.
 

Lbrdsoxfan

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I should stop watching BRStv.
Brs tv can be helpful, but there is a lot of product pimping that's unnecessary and the typical reefer doesn't need. I don't get why people take what they say as gospel.
 

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I should stop watching BRStv.
It's ok, we have all been there but I learned quickly to listen to the group of experienced reefers on this site. Yes they have different opinions here and there about how to be successful but most are pretty consistent on the requirements of a new tank and the first year of reefing. Patience is critical and the most important thing I learned early on and even then I could have been more patient. Enjoy the challenging hobby. Educate yourself as much as possible. Use the good advise from experienced reefers here to be successful.
 

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I have 2 month old 35 gallon tank with 5 fishes and 2 corals. Nitrate is around 2. Haven't checked phosphates. Started noticing this greenish brown algae on my rocks. I am guessing it is the "Ugly phase" of my tank. I am treating the tank with a daily dose of Brightwell Aquatics Clean and Bio Reef fuel. I don't have a skimmer. I do have UV.
Should I fight it with Brightwell aquatics razor or red slime or chemiclean or anything similar?

Also my parameters are low but still it looks the water is slightly yellowish. Is there anyway to treat that?

unnamed.jpg
Hi could you post the same picture under white light only, it looks like you may have some Cyanobacteria forming at the top of that rock that wouldn’t be considered normal or part of a cycling process. If it is you may want to address that sooner rather than later, the yellow ish water that you mentioned may be part of the problem as you don’t have a protein skimmer there will be a built up of organics that can cause the water to go yellow and some times related to heavy feeding other reasons could be the improper use of organic carbon driving one or both inorganic nutrients to go zero or creating a rapid decrease in nutrients if it’s overdosed. the best solution to remove the yellow tint from the water is using Granular Activated Carbon of a good quality. Testing phosphates will be also fairly important as a saltwater aquarists you can keep your nutrients low but always detectable if nitrates or phosphates hits zero you may start observing all kinds of nuisances that require a lot of time and effort to eliminate with natural methods.
 
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harsha22

harsha22

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Hi could you post the same picture under white light only, it looks like you may have some Cyanobacteria forming at the top of that rock that wouldn’t be considered normal or part of a cycling process. If it is you may want to address that sooner rather than later, the yellow ish water that you mentioned may be part of the problem as you don’t have a protein skimmer there will be a built up of organics that can cause the water to go yellow and some times related to heavy feeding other reasons could be the improper use of organic carbon driving one or both inorganic nutrients to go zero or creating a rapid decrease in nutrients if it’s overdosed. the best solution to remove the yellow tint from the water is using Granular Activated Carbon of a good quality. Testing phosphates will be also fairly important as a saltwater aquarists you can keep your nutrients low but always detectable if nitrates or phosphates hits zero you may start observing all kinds of nuisances that require a lot of time and effort to eliminate with natural methods.
It is definitely dark brown in color.
 

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Erin1971Texas

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it looks like you may have some Cyanobacteria forming at the top of that rock that wouldn’t be considered normal or part of a cycling process
Actually, while not every new tank goes through a cyano stage, to say it's "not normal or part of" the process of a maturing tank is inaccurate.
 

Tiki_Reef

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I agree with everyone here dosing a 2 month old tank is just asking for a problem. As @Erin1971Texas has said a tank should be able to go a year without any type of dosing water changes should be sufficient to replace major and minor elements, and you will definitely know when you need to dose because your test results will reflect it personally I would just keep up with water changes and let your tank do it's thing.
 
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Tiki_Reef

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In case it is cyano, are regular water changes the only answer or should I any product?
I mean water changes help but you are going to want to remove as much as possible by vacuuming it off of the affected areas sand bed rocks etc (assuming it is cyano), another option is turning off the lights for a few days since cyanobacteria needs light to grow that's is how I got my outbreak to subside a year ago. You also have to remember that about 95% of the reefers on here have had a cyano outbreak and it isn't that bad infact it is sort of a right of passage.
 

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