What is your opinion on iodine concentration in Tropic Marin All-For-Reef?

  • Iodine concentration in All-For-Reef could be higher

    Votes: 19 82.6%
  • Iodine concentration in All-For-Reef is exactly right

    Votes: 3 13.0%
  • Iodine concentration in All-For-Reef is rather on the high side

    Votes: 1 4.3%

  • Total voters
    23

Hans-Werner

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Hi,

My name is Hans-Werner Balling and I am doing R&D at Tropic Marin. I also have developed the All-For-Reef.

Iodine is a very important trace element for coral growth, coloration and polyp extension.

Low iodine concentrations slow coral growth, make the brown color fade to a pale grey-beige and especially gorogonians may show reduced or no polyp extension at all.

High iodine concentrations make the corals dark brown but this depends from nitrogen supply also. Iodine is important for the adaptation of coral and zooxanthellae pigmentation, both, photosynthetic pigmentation of the zooxanthellae and fluorescent pigmentation of the coral polyps.

Unfortunately iodine consumption in a tank is neither connected to calcium nor to alkalinity consumption. Rather iodine consumption is dominated by gorgonians and sponges but iodine concentration also affects other corals like leather corals, Heliopora, SPS and LPS, in short quite all corals.

In a thread about ICP analysis I found a post that iodine dosing with our A- Elements and maybe also with All-For-Reef may be rather on the low side. In my opinion slightly high iodine concentrations may be better than low concentrations. I already wondered whether we should increase iodine concentrations in A- Elements and especially in All-For-Reef for some time.

To get clarity about this question I wanted to ask you, what your experiences are. Is iodine concentration of All-For-Reef rather on the low side or exactly right? Which concentrations do you get back from ICP-analysis, 60 ppb or more or less? Do you find any of the descriped symptoms of low iodine concentration in your tank?

Thanks for your contribution.

Hans-Werner
 

A Young reefer

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Hi,

My name is Hans-Werner Balling and I am doing R&D at Tropic Marin. I also have developed the All-For-Reef.

Iodine is a very important trace element for coral growth, coloration and polyp extension.

Low iodine concentrations slow coral growth, make the brown color fade to a pale grey-beige and especially gorogonians may show reduced or no polyp extension at all.

High iodine concentrations make the corals dark brown but this depends from nitrogen supply also. Iodine is important for the adaptation of coral and zooxanthellae pigmentation, both, photosynthetic pigmentation of the zooxanthellae and fluorescent pigmentation of the coral polyps.

Unfortunately iodine consumption in a tank is neither connected to calcium nor to alkalinity consumption. Rather iodine consumption is dominated by gorgonians and sponges but iodine concentration also affects other corals like leather corals, Heliopora, SPS and LPS, in short quite all corals.

In a thread about ICP analysis I found a post that iodine dosing with our A- Elements and maybe also with All-For-Reef may be rather on the low side. In my opinion slightly high iodine concentrations may be better than low concentrations. I already wondered whether we should increase iodine concentrations in A- Elements and especially in All-For-Reef for some time.

To get clarity about this question I wanted to ask you, what your experiences are. Is iodine concentration of All-For-Reef rather on the low side or exactly right? Which concentrations do you get back from ICP-analysis, 60 ppb or more or less? Do you find any of the descriped symptoms of low iodine concentration in your tank?

Thanks for your contribution.

Hans-Werner
I am using all for reef , haven't tested for iodine yet but I was just asking myself this question since I feel that its a bit low from the looks of my corals .
 
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Hans-Werner

Hans-Werner

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Did you consider macro-algae refugiums for trace elements included in All-For-Reef? It is common to have different consumption on Fe, Mo, Iodine.

Since especially iodine consumption is high and quite variable from tank to tank we took a careful iodine dosage mainly based on decades of experience and empiric numbers from literature.

I have changed my mind whether it is better to be careful with iodine dosage or whether it is better to be rather on the high side with iodine dosage since the consumption in the tank can and will adapt by increased growth of organisms needing and consuming iodine.

Since iodine also seems to be an important nutrient for all corals this also applies to corals.

I think in Fe there are contrasting needs of corals and algae and higher Fe dosage would mainly benefit algae.

Judging from our internal ICP analyses from our experimental systems Mo seems to fit quite well and needs no higher dosage. We also have not hint from users that Mo concentration in our trace element additives could be higher.
 
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Hans-Werner

Hans-Werner

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Thank you all for your reactions so far. The poll is still open and we are curious for any further response.
I have already started to do the maths for new formulations. :)
 
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Hans-Werner

Hans-Werner

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so is the iodine actually low ?
... it depends ...;)

Actually the iodine consumption is not very closely coupled to consumption of calcium and alkalinity. All-For-Reef is mainly dosed according to the consumption of calcium and alkalinity.

In tanks harbouring mainly SPS with a high consumption of calcium and alkalinity the iodine supply will be balancing consumption, in many other tanks it may not.

Many tanks where All-For-Reef is supplied may not be SPS heavy and I have made the observation that it may be better to keep iodine rather a bit higher than the natural level of 50 to 60 ppb and a stable dynamic equilibrium will adjust.

Coral coloration may be a bit darker with higher iodine concentrations but fluorescent colors get more intense and growth and polyp extension is better.
 

Chrisv.

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I think at very least there should be an acknowledgement that one likely needs additional iodine when using all for reef. Since consumption is not coupled with calcium uptake, it really isn't an ideal exclusive source of iodine. I know that my lfs markets afr as containing all trace elements required.

I keep my calcium at 400 and alk at 10 using afr and I finally tested for iodine/iodide, only to find that it was zeroed out. I added an iodine supplement and certain corals looked much better within 24h.
 

dragon99

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I'll be able to answer in a couple weeks. Just about to send out new ICP samples. I don't normally do ICP on my nano that uses AFR, but I was curious what trace elements levels look like. I also just started daily A-/K+ dosing on my main tank so I'll be able to see if increases iodine above previous levels.
 
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Hans-Werner

Hans-Werner

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Thank you for reviving the thread!:)
Curious to know how iodine is replineshed in the ocean. In fact, where does it actually come from?
Like every other element in the oceans also iodine originally comes from the rocks of the earth crust. Like with all other elements, fresh minerals are transported to the surface by volcanism, released and washed out by weathering, transported to the sea by streams and rivers and finally arrive at the oceans. There they stay until they are bound somehow (for example in sponge and coral skeletons) and buried in the floor, subducted in certain zones where continental plates meet, recycled in the earth mantle until they get to the surface with volcanism again.

How much of an element is found in seawater depends on the concentration in the earth crust, in the rocks formed by volcanism and from the average residence time in seawater until it is buried in the ocean flor.
 

mikedb

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Thank you for reviving the thread!:)

Like every other element in the oceans also iodine originally comes from the rocks of the earth crust. Like with all other elements, fresh minerals are transported to the surface by volcanism, released and washed out by weathering, transported to the sea by streams and rivers and finally arrive at the oceans. There they stay until they are bound somehow (for example in sponge and coral skeletons) and buried in the floor, subducted in certain zones where continental plates meet, recycled in the earth mantle until they get to the surface with volcanism again.

How much of an element is found in seawater depends on the concentration in the earth crust, in the rocks formed by volcanism and from the average residence time in seawater until it is buried in the ocean flor.

Thank you for this outreach, Hans-Werner!

I use all Tropic Marin products on my 140G mixed reef and have been very satisfied with them. I use your Pro-Reef salt for 1% daily water changes, and the 'DIY All-For-Reef' recipe for dosing (I will be moving over to the All-For-Reef powder for my next order).

I also regularly do triton ICP testing, and low iodine levels are reported as the #1 concern with every test, to the extent that I now manually add Triton Iodine to my dosing containers.

Here is the most recent ICP test from my tank (prior to supplemental dosing): https://www.triton-lab.de/en/showroom/icp-oes/122548

I would certainly appreciate higher iodine levels in your trace elements/All-For-Reef products, but hopefully the packaging would indicate this change so I don't suddenly start overdosing Iodine!
 

Waynerock

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Been on AFR for over a year and a half, dose 35ml daily and even though my iodine usually tests low my tank seems happy. The test I use is hard to read but it seems on the low side. For me AFR has been my absolute secret sauce and I have been very happy. Since the powdered version came out I have been even more stoked. If y’all wanna make it better go right ahead.
 

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dragon99

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My ICP came back. Iodine is fine in my nano that's using AFR.

It's low in my main tank that I dose A+/K- daily.
 
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Hans-Werner

Hans-Werner

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Interesting, Dragon! I guess, water changes are in proportion much higher in the nano than in the main tank. To me there seem some shifts in water chemistry in the main tank while the nano seems to get a kind of resets with proportionally high water changes, which are very easy to do in a nano. Is my assessment correct?
 

dragon99

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Yes, the nano probably gets ~20% vs 10% in the main tank. I was initially doing weekly water changes and have moved to every 2 weeks since July which is also when I started daily A-/K+ dosing.

Iodine in the main tank has also been trending down over time:
1635778998396.png
 

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