Alternative ways to treat velvet besides copper?

odariel

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Hey,

i got a velvet outbreak in my secondary tank. It took a surgeon fish and a dragonette within the first 3-4 days. I got a clownfish mated pair that was ok at the begining but it started to deteriorate fast, there is also a chrysus wrasse and a yasha goby pair that seem to be inmune to it. So yesterday i took the clownfish pair out and placed them in a hospital tank and already dose the first dosage of cupramine. They have always been very avid eaters and since i dose the copper, they have stopped eating altogether. Last time i used copper i got the same result. Fish stop eating, so i was wondering if there is any alternative way of treating velvet besides copper.. (for example for ich, you could rotate the fish between different clean containers every 36 (or 24? cant remember) hours to ensure that the free swimming form of ich can't follow your fish... Is there a treatment similar to this for velvet? I got a spare of everything to be able to do this. (container, heater, pumps, etc)...

Any other way of treatment? i got bad results with copper everytime. (got the hanna checker HR and the dosage is correct as per readings and dosage instrucctions but the results aren't good. Fish always stopped eating... (they got a couple of pvc pipes for hiding space and these clowns are not stressed (got them at night superfast and together.)

So, any alternative treating methods? @Jay Hemdal, what do you recommend?

Thanks in advance.
 
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Jay Hemdal

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Hey,

i got a velvet outbreak in my secondary tank. It took a surgeon fish and a dragonette within the first 3-4 days. I got a clownfish mated pair that was ok at the begining but it started to deteriorate fast, there is also a chrysus wrasse and a yasha goby pair that seem to be inmune to it. So yesterday i took the clownfish pair out and placed them in a hospital tank and already dose the first dosage of cupramine. They have always been very avid eaters and since i dose the copper, they have stopped eating altogether. Last time i used copper i got the same result. Fish stop eating, so i was wondering if there is any alternative way of treating velvet besides copper.. (for example for ich, you could rotate the fish between different clean containers every 36 (or 24? cant remember) hours to ensure that the free swimming form of ich can't follow your fish... Is there a treatment similar to this for velvet? I got a spare of everything to be able to do this. (container, heater, pumps, etc)...

Any other way of treatment? i got bad results with copper everytime. (got the hanna checker HR and the dosage is correct as per readings and dosage instrucctions but the results aren't good. Fish always stopped eating... (they got a couple of pvc pipes for hiding space and these clowns are not stressed (got them at night superfast and together.)

So, any alternative treating methods? @Jay Hemdal, what do you recommend?

Thanks in advance.

Although cupramine is a bit harsher than coppersafe, it still should be well tolerated by clownfish. Issues with copper treatments often relate to some other problem: unstable quarantine tanks, mixing reducing agents, like Prime with copper, mis-measuring (unlikely here since you are using a Hanna) or starting copper too late - copper takes 3 days to begin working and velvet kills very quickly.

Alternative treatments for velvet include hydrogen peroxide dips at 75 ppm or chloroquine at 15 ppm. The dips sound great, except you need to move the fish into a "clean" tank after each of three dips. Chloroquine is tough to source and also has some toxicity issues with it.

Jay
 
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odariel

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Thank you @Jay Hemdal , maybe its my luck, but cupramine seems to induce fish to stop eating.. Maybe it is that i acted late, but just before i catched them (being already fully covered) they ate like hogs, and the next morning they didnt even looked at food... might look into the hydrogen peroxide dips. (no prime or anything as i used water from the aquarium to set up the hospital tank (direct from a UV light with super slow flow) and afterwards the uv light was treating the water for 40 mins before moving the clowns, afterwards, removed the uv light and dosed the copper, so no interference with any other chemicals at all. and ammonia sits at 0 ATM..

They are fat and strong, i guess they can survive some days with no food... they should be in top form as their diet has always been very good (krill + mysis + mussel bits, nori.. almost no dry flakes or pellets) and twice a week enriched for 40 mins prior to feeding with a vitamin complex (aquaforest AF VITALITY)...
 
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vetteguy53081

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Hey,

i got a velvet outbreak in my secondary tank. It took a surgeon fish and a dragonette within the first 3-4 days. I got a clownfish mated pair that was ok at the begining but it started to deteriorate fast, there is also a chrysus wrasse and a yasha goby pair that seem to be inmune to it. So yesterday i took the clownfish pair out and placed them in a hospital tank and already dose the first dosage of cupramine. They have always been very avid eaters and since i dose the copper, they have stopped eating altogether. Last time i used copper i got the same result. Fish stop eating, so i was wondering if there is any alternative way of treating velvet besides copper.. (for example for ich, you could rotate the fish between different clean containers every 36 (or 24? cant remember) hours to ensure that the free swimming form of ich can't follow your fish... Is there a treatment similar to this for velvet? I got a spare of everything to be able to do this. (container, heater, pumps, etc)...

Any other way of treatment? i got bad results with copper everytime. (got the hanna checker HR and the dosage is correct as per readings and dosage instrucctions but the results aren't good. Fish always stopped eating... (they got a couple of pvc pipes for hiding space and these clowns are not stressed (got them at night superfast and together.)

So, any alternative treating methods? @Jay Hemdal, what do you recommend?

Thanks in advance.
For me was use of both Polyp Lab MEDIC and Ruby Rally Pro.
Ruby Rally Pro alone is suppose to resolve issue alone and is reef safe but is slow to act
 
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vetteguy53081

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Thank you for chimming in @vetteguy53081 i gotta look for it, i am in Europe, spain, i dont know if we have rhe ruby rally available here.
Comparible in Europe would be Waterlife Myxazin or avloclor
 
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odariel

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Found both things here, going out to buy the rally pro now and use it. Poly lab will arrive next week.
will let you know how it works out.
Thank both of you!
 

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