Ammonia

Discussion in 'MindStream' started by Randy Holmes-Farley, Aug 27, 2015.

  1. Randy Holmes-Farley

    Randy Holmes-Farley Reef Chemist Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Article Contributor Expert Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2014
    Messages:
    24,105
    Likes Received:
    12,282
    Location:
    Arlington, Massachusetts, United States
    Hi Step Ahead,

    What is the lower limit of accurate quantitation of ammonia with the Mindstream, and can it detect ammonia in normal operating reef aquaria?

    TIA
     
    Tags:

  2. dcarwile

    dcarwile Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2013
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Hampton, Virginia
    I've been using Seneye for NH3 for some time now. I'm happy with it, but I'm giggity for mindstream. I love my seneye monitor so much(as a par meter and QT monitor), and all the measurements promised in mindstream seem too good to be true. If you provide anywhere near the accuracy of my seneye, I'll be in reefer tech heaven.
     
  3. Randy Holmes-Farley

    Randy Holmes-Farley Reef Chemist Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Article Contributor Expert Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2014
    Messages:
    24,105
    Likes Received:
    12,282
    Location:
    Arlington, Massachusetts, United States
    How low does it read and do you ever detect ammonia in a normal operating reef tank?
     
  4. s2nhle

    s2nhle Valuable Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2013
    Messages:
    1,336
    Likes Received:
    276
    Location:
    VA
    It will be great to find out the answer to this question.
     
  5. Step Ahead Innovations

    Step Ahead Innovations Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2015
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    105
    Thanks for your questions Randy and dcarwile. Yes, we can measure ammonia (NH3) in normal operating reef aquaria. The MindStream monitor can measure ammonia (NH3, not TAN) down to approx. 5 ppb. It can read ammonia to a maximum of about 150 ppb, and since our understanding of the general limit of where aquarists generally want to expose their fish and coral to is 20 ppb, 150 ppb should be more than sufficient.
    The MindStream monitor takes ongoing measurements of ammonia every 15 minutes and reports the results to a user's Internet-connected device in real-time. We are highly confident that the accuracy of our ammonia readings will be as accurate as those provided by Seneye.
     
  6. Randy Holmes-Farley

    Randy Holmes-Farley Reef Chemist Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Article Contributor Expert Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2014
    Messages:
    24,105
    Likes Received:
    12,282
    Location:
    Arlington, Massachusetts, United States
    Actually, I wasn't asking if you could technically do it, my question was whether you actually see non-zero ammonia in an operating (noncycling) reef tank. In other words, will it be of value to refers to have this in their main tank, and in what way.

    Jim Clark has just answered this question for me privately, but since I'm not sure what parts of that discussion he wants kept private, the question that I assume reefers will want to know is what use measuring ammonia will be for them in their normal display tank.

    Does it always read essentially none? Does it always read some real nonzero value that moves around and reefers might respond to it with tank tweaks? Does it only detect ammonia is problem situations, such as a dead creature? That's the question. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2015
  7. lexinverts

    lexinverts Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2015
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    67
    Location:
    Corvallis, OR
    For reference, some of the manual Ammonia test kits have a LOW limit of detection of approximately 200 ppb (Red Sea = 200 ppb, Salifert = 500 ppb). If the Mindstream can detect ammonia down to 5 ppb, I bet that the answer is YES. This would really be a potentially useful tool.
     
  8. Step Ahead Innovations

    Step Ahead Innovations Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2015
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    105
    Thanks for the opportunity to clarify Randy. Yes, in our tests, we always see some non-zero level in the tank as the bacteria would likely die off otherwise. If the fish are breathing, there is ammonia. The base level of ammonia will vary from tank to tank. Ammonia levels will also vary depending on how recently changes have been made to the tank. Additions of new fish will result in temporary increases in ammonia. An unexpected rapid increase in ammonia (which the MindStream monitor will report) is likely either the result of a dead fish or significant overfeeding. Both of these would be good to know right away.
     
    evolved, Reduck and lexinverts like this.
  9. lexinverts

    lexinverts Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2015
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    67
    Location:
    Corvallis, OR
    This is very cool! Thanks for clarifying.
     
  10. Grant

    Grant Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2014
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Tucson
    Also a December backer, looking forward to getting the product.
     
  11. dcarwile

    dcarwile Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2013
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Hampton, Virginia
    Hey Randy,

    Seneye goes to 1 ppb, but at that resolution the difference between 1 and 5 ppb is negligible for our purposes imo. The readings are ever present, but for ammonia, i find it most important in establishing new tanks. I did however, find mutiple issues with pH in my reef tank that I would have never caught by manually testing. Here is an example of my seneye dashboard. I can't wait to have all the additional parameters Mindstream offers!
     

    Attached Files:

Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page

Loading...