Anemone ID Please

Reefing102

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So this was sold to me as a BTA. I bought it, hoping it was a Ritteri (based on other observations, but I now know it’s obviously not that after seeing it in my tank). I’m now thinking it is actually a BTA or a Condy (tentacles are kinda short though).

Anyway, I’m not entirely too sure as the Bright Pink/Red base and purple tips are throwing me through a loop for BTA as I can’t recall seeing a BTA with either of those features. However it does glow green under blues (can’t say I’ve seen that in a condy) and it does bubble up, soo yea. If you need other pics, let me know and I’ll try my best to get them for you. Thanks!

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vetteguy53081

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Green bubble tip. Rose Bubble Tip Anemones are, by far, the most common type you’ll see on the market. They’re prolific propagators, which undoubtedly contributes to their popularity. This type is quite affordable and is a good option for first-time anemone owners. Rainbow bubble Tip Anemone that’s usually considered to be exotic. They’re rarer than standard Rose varieties and their pricing usually reflects that. The base of the Rainbow Bubble Tip Anemone is vibrant neon blue. This color gradually fades into a rose color on the tips of the tentacles.
Green Bubble Tip Anemones are fairly common. Like the Rose variety, these anemones are quite affordable and readily available in the trade.
The most important thing you’ll need to take care of before you bring your anemone home is perfecting the tank and water conditions. You should never place a Bubble Tip Anemone into a tank you just set up.
Take some time to get parameters just right and let the closed environment cycle for a few months. This ensures that conditions are stable and safe. Bubble Tip Anemones prefer warmer temperatures. Water should be on the alkali side as well. Monitor water conditions regularly to avoid any major changes. Ammonia and nitrate levels should be undetectable at all times using a good quakity test kit and Not API either.
Here are some water parameters to follow.
  • Water temperature: Between 77°F and 82°F (stay close to the middle of this range)
  • pH level: 8.1 to 8.4
  • Water hardness: 8 to 12 dKH
  • Specific gravity: 1.024 to 1.025
  • Nitrate < .5
When you first introduce the anemone to the tank, turn down any pumps. The flow should be minimal until the anemone gets settled in. Chances are, your new Bubble Tip Anemone will move around the tank until it finds a suitable spot to call home.
If it starts to move towards any coral, simply direct your water jets to the coral. This will discourage the anemone from anchoring near it. It will move to another area to attach.
Bubble Tip Anemone lighting is a very important aspect of their care. These creatures need a lot of light to truly thrive because they’re photosynthetic. Basically, that means that they absorb light to make food and grow. The anemone has zooxanthellae in its body, which are symbiotic microorganisms they feed on. Without proper lighting, the anemone will expel the zooxanthellae and turn white. This process is called bleaching and often leads to death.
A moderate amount of flow is recommended. Many aquarists agree that too much flow will cause the anemone to stretch out and look stringy. Keeping things moderate will help avoid this from happening. Avoid directing your jets at the anemone. The creatures enjoy subtle movement at all times. But too much direct flow hitting the anemone will force it to move.
Lastly- Feeding.
Bubble Tip Anemones feeding is one of the easiest parts of their care. These animals get food from a lot of different sources. As mentioned earlier, they are photosynthetic and use light to create food. They will also eat food off of the fish they host. These anemones enjoy small morsels of shrimp and squid. They will also accept many frozen foods. To feed the anemone, attach the food to a stick or large tweezers. Then, touch the anemone with it. The creature will use its tentacles to grab onto the food and consume it. twice a week feedings is ample
 
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Reefing102

Reefing102

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Hope you didn’t pay for a Ritteri
Ha no. I paid for a BTA. The way it looked in the tank (for what I could see) it gave vibes if Ritteri (the bright base, no bubbles, sitting right in front of a power head at the top of the tank reaching for light) but once it was in my tank, I quickly found it wasn’t. It’s all good though
 

James M

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Ha no. I paid for a BTA. The way it looked in the tank (for what I could see) it gave vibes if Ritteri (the bright base, no bubbles, sitting right in front of a power head at the top of the tank reaching for light) but once it was in my tank, I quickly found it wasn’t. It’s all good though
Well that’s good.
 
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