Aquarium Chemistry Question? Ask the Doctor!

Discussion in 'Reef Chemistry by Randy Holmes-Farley' started by revhtree, Mar 22, 2016.

  1. Randy Holmes-Farley

    Randy Holmes-Farley Reef Chemist Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Expert Contributor Article Contributor

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    I'm not sure which method would give the best results with that kit. I generally hold the card against a vial in a kit.
     

  2. Lninwa

    Lninwa Active Member

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    What nitrate test kit do you like the best?
     
  3. Randy Holmes-Farley

    Randy Holmes-Farley Reef Chemist Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Expert Contributor Article Contributor

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    I don't have a preference as I haven't measured nitrate in many years, but many people like the Salifert kit.
     
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  4. Floyd R Turbo

    Floyd R Turbo Super Duper Member R2R Supporter Gold Sponsor Toys For Kids Sponsor Article Contributor Partner Member 2018

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    +1 to that, I find Salifert Nitrate to be useful when Nitrate is between about 0 and 10 ppm, maybe 20. Above 10-20 ppm, I usually switch to API which is more subjective to determine the reading but it's super cheap - you just have to know how to use the kit properly (i.e. shake the #2 bottle hard for 30s, shake the vial hard for 60s, etc...) but as long as you do that and don't be lazy, you can get reliable results
     
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  5. Scott.h

    Scott.h Valuable Member Build Thread Contributor

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    @Randy Holmes-Farley is there any harm chemically with adding liquid phosphorus to dissolved potassium nitrate? Dosing both together from a dosing pump?

    Since dosing one tends to manipulate the other in the tank, I know my daily demands of each. Just wondering if there is any harm in adding phosphorus in proportion in the container.
     
  6. Randy Holmes-Farley

    Randy Holmes-Farley Reef Chemist Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Expert Contributor Article Contributor

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    I presume you mean a phosphate salt solution? Yes, that is fine. Sodium or potassium phosphate or something similar.
    Actual phosphorus burns on contact with water. lol
     
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  7. Scott.h

    Scott.h Valuable Member Build Thread Contributor

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    Ok I didn't know that. What I have is for planted freshwater. I think it's the same as seachem flourish phosphorus. It's what my lfs stocks. ..Potassium phosphorous I believe. 1 ml raises 100 gallons .01. I'm adding 3/10 ml every 3 days and 2ml potassium nitrate every day. Every time I have to add a little more N, my P drops below the .01 mark a few days later. I'm tired of testing. I figured why not make a weekly batch and see how that works as long as the solution is stable.
     
  8. Randy Holmes-Farley

    Randy Holmes-Farley Reef Chemist Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Expert Contributor Article Contributor

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    That sounds like a fine plan. All such products are phosphate. :)
     
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  9. lawise

    lawise Active Member

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    Randy my pH is 8.3 but my alkalinity is 7.7 things are going pretty good in my tank except I don't know what to do about this
     
  10. Randy Holmes-Farley

    Randy Holmes-Farley Reef Chemist Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Expert Contributor Article Contributor

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    About what? pH 8.3 and 7.7 dKH for alkalinity are perfect. :)

    I assume you do not mean 7.7 meq/L.
     
  11. lawise

    lawise Active Member

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    I thought 7.7 dkh was a little low but if I raise that I figured my pH would go up
     
  12. Randy Holmes-Farley

    Randy Holmes-Farley Reef Chemist Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Expert Contributor Article Contributor

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    Neither is a concern.

    The ocean is actually a bit below 7 dKH, and I generally recommend 7-11 dKH.

    The pH will not get too high if you boost alk in an appropriate way. :)
     
  13. Turboreefer

    Turboreefer Member

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    Randy. My ph is 8.2 alk is 8.8dkh and calc is 430 ppm. I would like to move towards 10 alk. I drop 1 ml red sea alk to my tank today and see that alk solidfy and became like white snow particles. Is this percipitation and what is causing this?
     
  14. Turboreefer

    Turboreefer Member

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  15. Randy Holmes-Farley

    Randy Holmes-Farley Reef Chemist Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Expert Contributor Article Contributor

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    There are two types of precipitation.

    One is the normal formation of cloudiness that is magnesium hydroxide that redissolves as it mixes in. That's no concern.

    The other is a slower precipitation of calcium carbonate that will not redissolve, leaving the tank cloudy, or hardening the sand, or coating the sides near where you dose it.

    Diluting the additive more, adding to a higher flow area, and possibly switching to a lower pH additive will reduce both.
     
  16. Sdot

    Sdot Member

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    Hello all, I need some advice/ help with my reef. My tank is/ will be primarily an sps tank. I have purchased a few frags from a local fish store, I was told to achieve maximum growth, a high PH and pristine water conditions are the prerequisites. I currently dose 5ml of 2 part solution each day and 5 ml of MAG each Tuesday. Here are my tank water parameters.

    PH: 7.8 -7.9

    Ammonia: 0

    Nitrite: 0

    Nitrate: 0

    Phos: 0

    SG: 1.025 (Refractometer)

    ALK: 8.0

    Cal: 435

    MAG: 1350

    I direct feed my corals/fish every other day (I have a huge population of pods, my fish graze on). My corals are growing, however I’m curious is there anything else I can do to speed up the process? Also, my PH is on the lower side of acceptable, should I be concerned? Is it slowing my corals growth? Or do I need more patience? Thanks, in advanced.

    20170902_164403.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2017
  17. Randy Holmes-Farley

    Randy Holmes-Farley Reef Chemist Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Expert Contributor Article Contributor

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    Growth will be slower at pH 7.8, but the corals will be fine. :)

    Pristine may mean too low of nutrients, and the corals may need more nitrate and phosphate.
     
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  18. Sdot

    Sdot Member

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    Follow-up question. Will feeding them directly not suffice? Also i thought with me dosing the tank that would raise the PH? What could i do naturally to raise it, dose kalkwasser?
     
  19. Randy Holmes-Farley

    Randy Holmes-Farley Reef Chemist Staff Member Team R2R R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Expert Contributor Article Contributor

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    It might, if you can feed enough of the things those types of corals actually eat. But many people have more success with a few ppm nitrate and around 0.02 ppm phosphate. :)
     
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  20. Sdot

    Sdot Member

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    Thanks for great information
     
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