can the effects of stray voltage on a fish be misdiagnosed as a disease in the early stages of exposure to said voltage??

TSM Aquatics

david campbell

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Jun 8, 2018
Messages
659
Reaction score
308
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
ok, one week or so before I left for vacation I posted about moving my Emporer from his 150 to a 220. here's the thread. he slowly went downhill. this is when installed a UV sterilizer as an aid (remember this statement)


then I had several fish die-off in my 220 including the Emporer a few days in a row, came to the conclusion it was velvet (diagnosed post-death of the Emporer, really it was the best guess by myself and a vet) I removed the remaining fish and ask how to dose CP chloroquine phosphate (not copper) here's that thread.


when I returned from my fishing trip my wife tells me that when placing her hands in the water to remove floss she got zapped and that it was not the first time she told me this, back then I wrote that off as a salt sting because I have never been popped when placing my hands in the tank. my son also confirmed getting zap when attempting to put his hands in as well. again I do not remember receiving any shocks when going into the water to get the survivors out ( remember this statement also).

so today I tested for stray voltage. Here's what I found. all corals, snails, crabs, and anemones are still alive and appear unaffected pre voltage test.

117.6 volts in the DT, It broke down as follows.
uv pump--113.0v.-- I placed this pump in some normal tap water and the voltage dropped to 5.6 but when I wiggle it around the voltage swings up to10v but did not hit my tested recorded 113.
a 300w heater -- 1v.
bio pellet reactor -- 1v.
return pump-- 2.6v.

SO HERES THE QUESTIONS? can the effects of stray voltage on a fish be displayed in the same manner as if the fish was affected by ich, velvet, etc. we know that when fish are affected by external parasites they flash and so on. do they behave the same if affected by stray voltage? If the answer is YES, Then does one still let the tank sit fallow? what is an acceptable stray voltage level?
 
Last edited:
Maxout

ChaosAquaculture

Specializing in the Ridiculous
View Badges
Joined
Dec 14, 2017
Messages
1,020
Reaction score
1,694
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Wellington, FL
Personally, I don’t believe the stray voltage is what killed them. That would be more of a seeking look then flashing and trying to itch against rocks. What were their symptoms while they were sick? It’s a very interesting situation- kali
 

Treefer32

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Apr 1, 2013
Messages
810
Reaction score
508
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Fargo, ND
Ok. I have so much to say on this and not enough time and hard to write the emotion that goes into it. I had this happen, and have first hand experience...

I had gotten some Anthias and a powder blue tang. Both were eating great and doing great for 2-3 months.

Then suddenly, I found a fish jumped out. Then two fish dead a week later for no reason in the rocks. Then about 5-7 days later my Banghai cardinals were in various states of popeye and died off one by one.

My Powder blue then developed welts all over its body and died another week later. I was testing everything and not overreacting. I did a 30 % water change, monitored basics like salinity, testing with multiple calibrated refractometers. I tested my chemistry. I couldn't figure it out.

3 weeks in I had lost 15 fish all in different ways (350 gallon display). I had never been shocked, I work in my 350 too much an hour or two every week cleaning the glass, doing maintenance on powerheads, you name it. There's always something to do. . . I never felt a shock.

I was at my wits end. I talked to the local fish store owner (salt water store) and asked him what the heck why is everything dying.

His first question was "How are your corals fairing?" I said, you know, now that you ask, I've noticed several corals that were not growing at all now having visible growth in the last month. Several of them noticeably larger. I said that's the confusing part, if it was something in the water, like metal, copper, or other things that are bad for both inverts and fish, wouldn't my snails and corals be dying... Which, yes, the answer usually is yes. Salinity, snails, anemones (of which none of mine were showing any signs of stress.)

He said, have you checked for stray voltage? I said, no, but why would I. My corals would be dying. . . "He said, nope, google electrified cages to rebuild a reef in the 1980s."

I said, "HUH?"

There are many articles out there now on google, showing how we're advancing the use of electricity to help corals grow skeletons faster and easier. However, stray voltage can stress fish significantly.

I told the fish store owner he's crazy. I stick my hands in the tank all the time. I don't feel any shocks. " He gave me a strange look, like how dumb are you?

"Your body needs to be thoroughly grounded in order to feel it."

I don't recommend this, because what I did next could have killed me. But, I stuck my hand in the sump and placed my other hand on something I assumed would be grounded, the metal sides of my furnace / air handler. I think my hair stood up on end. I couldn't believe it.

I still thought maybe, like you, it was a salt sting.. Chemical burn type feeling. But my hair on my neck stood up. My hand vibrated that was in the sump. The hand touching the furnace stung. Almost hurt.

I said o.k. maybe there's truth to this. I used my apex to shut pumps off one at a time. I had a couple corded powerheads, skimmer pump, and two 300 watt heaters that were submerged. So, it would be easy to turn each off one at a time to find the culprit. Sticking my hand in each time to verify if the electricity was gone..

I discovered one of my two 300 watt heaters was leaking electricity. The vibrating stopped. Just to confirm I turned the heater back on and retested and sure enough the sting and electrical charge was there again. I then shut it off and watched my last few remaining fish and my black long nose tang whom had stopped swimming the full length of the tank for some time, now was swimming gleefully the full 6 feet of the tank. I went and turned the heater back on and observed the tank. It seriously went to swimming in small concentric circles.

I turned the heater off. Pulled it out. purchased two new Finnex heaters from the LFS. threw both of the old ones out.

I was able to save one fish. My Black long nose tang. That was going on 3 years ago. It took 4-5 weeks to find the problem. I lost in total 16-17 fish from that incident. Hundreds of dollars down the drain.

Having getting that all in check, I didn't trust there weren't secondary issues like other bacteria, disease, viruses, parasites that the electricity fostered in the fish. I left the tank for 4 -5 months with just the black tang in it. He was lonely in a 350. But, I just was so disgusted with it all I couldn't bring myself to add more fish.

Now, three years later, same tank, same everything except the 2-3 year old heaters now. I have 25 new fish. Many of them going on 2 years old now and healthy. My black long nose tang is going on 7-8 years old.

I can't express how defeated you must feel. I almost gave up. If it wasn't in my wall in the basement, I might have given up.. But, I let it sit, neglected it a few months then restarted it slowly adding a few fish every 2-3 months. And they have all thrived since then.

Electricity does kill fish, it affects their brains, their immune systems, and their ability survive. It however, will help corals to put down new skeletons, causing them to look healthier and grow faster.

I'm very sorry!
 
OP
david campbell

david campbell

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Jun 8, 2018
Messages
659
Reaction score
308
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
thanks. that sound 99% similar to my issue, the 1% difference being where we live. HAHAHA, like you corals also have should good growth. I too am kinda disgusted by the fish loss. im glad you hung in there. I do have a very strict 2 tank qt routine so it was odd that sickness should pop up after only transferring a 3-year-old healthy fish from one tank to another.

after discovering this I am NOW pondering the idea of a voltage alarm, maybe instaling a test light near my tank. you know the kinda they use on cars, I wonder if anything over 12 volts leaks into the tank the light comes on. kinda like a voltage alarm. HMMMMMM

I think from now on when I read a sick fish post/thread my first response will be to check for stray voltage.
I have since removed the bad pump, but still have 12v in the tank. I removed everything and tested each in a 5-gallon bucket prior to reinstalling and here's where I stand.

1 heater --2v
2nd heater-- 2v
bio pellet reactor -- 1v
return pump- 5v
skimmer --2v

the good news is it's 117
Personally, I don’t believe the stray voltage is what killed them. That would be more of a seeking look then flashing and trying to itch against rocks. What were their symptoms while they were sick? It’s a very interesting situation- kali
THE EMPORER was faded out, never developed a clear-cut velvet look. the others i just found dead. the issue in my head was " they just do not look sick, but they are dead"
 
Fritz

Lowell Lemon

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
May 23, 2015
Messages
2,817
Reaction score
11,677
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Washington State
Saw same results with central filtration system in fish store. Found source (light system), repaired it, grounded the sump for induced voltage and the fish loss stopped.
 

vetteguy53081

Well known Member and monster tank lover
View Badges
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
48,765
Reaction score
110,659
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Wisconsin - Florida in several months
Thats too bad. In many cases, stray voltage will be mistaken as lateral line erosion
 

Elaine123

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 26, 2020
Messages
1,576
Reaction score
4,515
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Nashville Tennessee
Ok. I have so much to say on this and not enough time and hard to write the emotion that goes into it. I had this happen, and have first hand experience...

I had gotten some Anthias and a powder blue tang. Both were eating great and doing great for 2-3 months.

Then suddenly, I found a fish jumped out. Then two fish dead a week later for no reason in the rocks. Then about 5-7 days later my Banghai cardinals were in various states of popeye and died off one by one.

My Powder blue then developed welts all over its body and died another week later. I was testing everything and not overreacting. I did a 30 % water change, monitored basics like salinity, testing with multiple calibrated refractometers. I tested my chemistry. I couldn't figure it out.

3 weeks in I had lost 15 fish all in different ways (350 gallon display). I had never been shocked, I work in my 350 too much an hour or two every week cleaning the glass, doing maintenance on powerheads, you name it. There's always something to do. . . I never felt a shock.

I was at my wits end. I talked to the local fish store owner (salt water store) and asked him what the heck why is everything dying.

His first question was "How are your corals fairing?" I said, you know, now that you ask, I've noticed several corals that were not growing at all now having visible growth in the last month. Several of them noticeably larger. I said that's the confusing part, if it was something in the water, like metal, copper, or other things that are bad for both inverts and fish, wouldn't my snails and corals be dying... Which, yes, the answer usually is yes. Salinity, snails, anemones (of which none of mine were showing any signs of stress.)

He said, have you checked for stray voltage? I said, no, but why would I. My corals would be dying. . . "He said, nope, google electrified cages to rebuild a reef in the 1980s."

I said, "HUH?"

There are many articles out there now on google, showing how we're advancing the use of electricity to help corals grow skeletons faster and easier. However, stray voltage can stress fish significantly.

I told the fish store owner he's crazy. I stick my hands in the tank all the time. I don't feel any shocks. " He gave me a strange look, like how dumb are you?

"Your body needs to be thoroughly grounded in order to feel it."

I don't recommend this, because what I did next could have killed me. But, I stuck my hand in the sump and placed my other hand on something I assumed would be grounded, the metal sides of my furnace / air handler. I think my hair stood up on end. I couldn't believe it.

I still thought maybe, like you, it was a salt sting.. Chemical burn type feeling. But my hair on my neck stood up. My hand vibrated that was in the sump. The hand touching the furnace stung. Almost hurt.

I said o.k. maybe there's truth to this. I used my apex to shut pumps off one at a time. I had a couple corded powerheads, skimmer pump, and two 300 watt heaters that were submerged. So, it would be easy to turn each off one at a time to find the culprit. Sticking my hand in each time to verify if the electricity was gone..

I discovered one of my two 300 watt heaters was leaking electricity. The vibrating stopped. Just to confirm I turned the heater back on and retested and sure enough the sting and electrical charge was there again. I then shut it off and watched my last few remaining fish and my black long nose tang whom had stopped swimming the full length of the tank for some time, now was swimming gleefully the full 6 feet of the tank. I went and turned the heater back on and observed the tank. It seriously went to swimming in small concentric circles.

I turned the heater off. Pulled it out. purchased two new Finnex heaters from the LFS. threw both of the old ones out.

I was able to save one fish. My Black long nose tang. That was going on 3 years ago. It took 4-5 weeks to find the problem. I lost in total 16-17 fish from that incident. Hundreds of dollars down the drain.

Having getting that all in check, I didn't trust there weren't secondary issues like other bacteria, disease, viruses, parasites that the electricity fostered in the fish. I left the tank for 4 -5 months with just the black tang in it. He was lonely in a 350. But, I just was so disgusted with it all I couldn't bring myself to add more fish.

Now, three years later, same tank, same everything except the 2-3 year old heaters now. I have 25 new fish. Many of them going on 2 years old now and healthy. My black long nose tang is going on 7-8 years old.

I can't express how defeated you must feel. I almost gave up. If it wasn't in my wall in the basement, I might have given up.. But, I let it sit, neglected it a few months then restarted it slowly adding a few fish every 2-3 months. And they have all thrived since then.

Electricity does kill fish, it affects their brains, their immune systems, and their ability survive. It however, will help corals to put down new skeletons, causing them to look healthier and grow faster.

I'm very sorry!
I had to laugh at your testing methodology. A friend of mine was teasing me that I should have done what you did. I had a Finnex controller temperature probe be defective several weeks ago. I used a voltage multimeter to locate the problem. I hope you have added an external GFCI unit and a ground probe to your tank. The latter had fallen out of my tank and that was what led to discovering the problem before any fish loss. Thankfully, the GFCI kicked in!
 

Operation Philo Beddoe

Community Member
View Badges
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Messages
47
Reaction score
22
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Chandler
ok, one week or so before I left for vacation I posted about moving my Emporer from his 150 to a 220. here's the thread. he slowly went downhill. this is when installed a UV sterilizer as an aid (remember this statement)


then I had several fish die-off in my 220 including the Emporer a few days in a row, came to the conclusion it was velvet (diagnosed post-death of the Emporer, really it was the best guess by myself a vet) I removed the remaining fish and ask how to dose CP chloroquine phosphate (not copper) here's that thread. I do not remember receiving any shocks when going into the water to get the survivors out ( remember this statement also).


when I returned from my fishing trip my wife tells me that when placing her hands in the water to remove floss she got zapped and that it was not the first time she told me this, back then I wrote that off as a salt sting because I have never been popped when placing my hands in the tank. my son also confirmed getting zap when attempting to put his hands in as well.

so today I tested for stray voltage. Here's what I found. all corals, snails, crabs, and anemones are still alive and appear unaffected pre voltage test.

117.6 volts in the DT, It broke down as follows.
uv pump--113.0v.-- I placed this pump in some normal tap water and the voltage dropped to 5.6 but when I wiggle it around the voltage swings up to10v but did not hit my tested recorded 113.
a 300w heater -- 1v.
bio pellet reactor -- 1v.
return pump-- 2.6v.

SO HERES THE QUESTIONS? can the effects of stray voltage on a fish be displayed in the same manner as if the fish was affected by ich, velvet, etc. we know that when fish are affected by external parasites they flash and so on. do they behave the same if affected by stray voltage? If the answer is YES, Then does one still let the tank sit fallow? what is an acceptable stray voltage level?
I did T2T then to observation in a 20 long. They (sailfin and purple) had slight HLLE they developed in copper. It got waaaay worse especially for the sailfin. This went on for 2 months they looked terrible no matter the water changes or meds. I sat down 2 days ago, went to humble fish re-read the basics because this should not be happening. 58Vac found in my tank. I had skipped over the stray voltage warnings previously. There was no biggest culprit it was 15 on each HOB, 5 from a light 3-4 Nero 3. Unplugged everything got it down to 5-10.5Vac. No amps thankfully so no shocks.. I took a spare plug end, attached a piece of SS safety wire to the ground and connected to the tank. In 2 days my sailfin’s colors are returning, had turned white and it is now eating everything. The sailfin also had rapid breathing, to the point I had assumed flukes or something bad at one point. The purple never stopped eating, had slight HLLE and grey color. It looks happier and is purple again, tail was faded.
Thankfully the COR-20 is about 3.5v, where my aqua clear HOB is 15. I’m placing a ground in each tank, rest of my life.
 
Top Shelf Aquatics

Treefer32

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Apr 1, 2013
Messages
810
Reaction score
508
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Fargo, ND
I had to laugh at your testing methodology. A friend of mine was teasing me that I should have done what you did. I had a Finnex controller temperature probe be defective several weeks ago. I used a voltage multimeter to locate the problem. I hope you have added an external GFCI unit and a ground probe to your tank. The latter had fallen out of my tank and that was what led to discovering the problem before any fish loss. Thankfully, the GFCI kicked in!
Actually it was on GFCI. The heater was plugged into my Apex EB8 and the EB8 was plugged into the GFCI. Never tripped once in the 5 weeks. What's funny, is the other outlet my non-critical items are on such as my lights and circulation pumps in the tank are all on a second EB8 and that outlet also has the dehumidifier. Occasionally the breaker trips on that one. The GFCI doesn't trip... The breaker trips... I assume is the power draw from the dehumidifier. But, I don't understand why the GFCI doesn't trip first.

I tried a voltage multi-meter and I couldn't get it to show anything useful no matter what setting I used, the numbers just constantly went all over. I tried that first before using my body, couldn't figure out how to use the meter.
 

reeferjeeper

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Jan 12, 2021
Messages
124
Reaction score
197
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
USA
Ok. I have so much to say on this and not enough time and hard to write the emotion that goes into it. I had this happen, and have first hand experience...
First off I'm sorry about the loss and hardships you had over this, but WOW this is one of the craziest stories I've read on R2R, thank you for sharing! I would have never guessed stray voltage being the culprit... also props to your LFS crew on that knowledge, puts my LFS to shame lol
 

Jay Hemdal

7500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Jul 31, 2020
Messages
8,548
Reaction score
7,959
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Dundee
ok, one week or so before I left for vacation I posted about moving my Emporer from his 150 to a 220. here's the thread. he slowly went downhill. this is when installed a UV sterilizer as an aid (remember this statement)


then I had several fish die-off in my 220 including the Emporer a few days in a row, came to the conclusion it was velvet (diagnosed post-death of the Emporer, really it was the best guess by myself a vet) I removed the remaining fish and ask how to dose CP chloroquine phosphate (not copper) here's that thread. I do not remember receiving any shocks when going into the water to get the survivors out ( remember this statement also).


when I returned from my fishing trip my wife tells me that when placing her hands in the water to remove floss she got zapped and that it was not the first time she told me this, back then I wrote that off as a salt sting because I have never been popped when placing my hands in the tank. my son also confirmed getting zap when attempting to put his hands in as well.

so today I tested for stray voltage. Here's what I found. all corals, snails, crabs, and anemones are still alive and appear unaffected pre voltage test.

117.6 volts in the DT, It broke down as follows.
uv pump--113.0v.-- I placed this pump in some normal tap water and the voltage dropped to 5.6 but when I wiggle it around the voltage swings up to10v but did not hit my tested recorded 113.
a 300w heater -- 1v.
bio pellet reactor -- 1v.
return pump-- 2.6v.

SO HERES THE QUESTIONS? can the effects of stray voltage on a fish be displayed in the same manner as if the fish was affected by ich, velvet, etc. we know that when fish are affected by external parasites they flash and so on. do they behave the same if affected by stray voltage? If the answer is YES, Then does one still let the tank sit fallow? what is an acceptable stray voltage level?
Sorry for your loss. IMO stray voltage, either from defective equipment or induced voltage from pumps is a red herring. Back when I did my HLLE study, we measured all of the tanks in our systems - there was NO correlation between measured voltage and any health effects. Indeed, grounding the tanks changed nothing.
Look at virtually every case; a person has a fish health problem. They then measure, and discover, current flow to ground. They then incorrectly assume causation. What is lacking in every case is some consistent control: like if you started with no voltage measured and then create voltage and note health changes. With our study, we checked every tank in the building (35 of them I think). There was no causation.
Ultimately, since the fish are not grounded, there is no electrical potential through their bodies. The only issue I’ve ever seen have been human health issues from being shocked and one case where a defective heater caused electrolysis in the water, forming sulfates (and that still didn’t kill the fish).
Jay
 

Lowell Lemon

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
May 23, 2015
Messages
2,817
Reaction score
11,677
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Washington State
Jay,

So are you saying that fish health is not affected by electrical current or just HLLE? The OP asked the question as to whether electrical current could be misdiagnosed as a disease process?
 
Last edited:
Avast

ReefGeezer

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Nov 9, 2009
Messages
652
Reaction score
779
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Wichita, KS
I always thought that "stray voltage" was only measurable (or present) where there was a ground path. Otherwise it is just potential voltage. For example, put your meter leads in the water. I believe the reading would be 0 volts. Now, put one lead in the water and ground the other. You might be able to read a positive voltage if there is truly some "stray" voltage. Let me ask the group this... If that is true, why would the fish be effected if they aren't grounded?
 

Lowell Lemon

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
May 23, 2015
Messages
2,817
Reaction score
11,677
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Washington State
I always thought that "stray voltage" was only measurable (or present) where there was a ground path. Otherwise it is just potential voltage. For example, put your meter leads in the water. I believe the reading would be 0 volts. Now, put one lead in the water and ground the other. You might be able to read a positive voltage if there is truly some "stray" voltage. Let me ask the group this... If that is true, why would the fish be effected if they aren't grounded?
When you have a bad pump or heater the circuit is now complete due to the neutral lead...correct? It may not act as a complete ground due to the faulty circuit. Just a thought.
 

Treefer32

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Apr 1, 2013
Messages
810
Reaction score
508
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Fargo, ND
@Jay Hemdal I have to disagree with you. I witnessed my black long nosed tang swimming in circles when there was stray voltage. When I unplugged the bad heater, it stopped swimming in circles. When I plugged it back in it immediately went to swimming in circles.

I don't know the mechanics of electricity well enough to understand how or why fish would be effected. But, I have absolutely ZERO doubt that my fish got sick because of stray voltage, which led to deterioration of their health within days. My tang, survived the stress because of his slime coat. He has what I would call burn scars scross the top of his body up to and including his head where is nice sleak black flesh is dulled, faded, like it was definitely scarred. He didn't have that either prior to the electricution. I was saddened that he lost some of his shine.

Now, what I don't know is if the electricity caused neurological damage that the fish couldn't eat, digest, couldn't breathe correctly, etc, which stressed them that they succombed to random parasites, illnesses, viruses, etc. All I know is that my tang, the trooper that he is was without a doubt affected neurologically by the electricity. I repeated the test multiple times because I didn't believe it myself. I thought it was just because he saw me. So I approached the tank differently each time to make sure, is he swimming in circles because he feels like it or because of the electricity. As soon as I unplugged the heater, he started swimming the full length of the tank and acting normal.

Thankfully he was an adult tang or he probably wouldn't have survived. I'm thinking it's body size, slime coat, etc. that protected him. Plus, why would corals put down calcium carbonate skeletons faster, when the water is electrified if it didn't have an effect on the water?

I am open to opposing evidence. The experience I had, maybe a 1 in a million fluke, was very apparent my tang's behavior changed based on electrocution or not. Maybe it's amount of voltage? Or whether the circuit is completely grounded or not? I don't know. Whether all 16 of my fish started with an illness and it was exasperated by electricity? I don't know that either. Chicken or egg....
 

Jay Hemdal

7500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Jul 31, 2020
Messages
8,548
Reaction score
7,959
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Dundee
@Jay Hemdal I have to disagree with you. I witnessed my black long nosed tang swimming in circles when there was stray voltage. When I unplugged the bad heater, it stopped swimming in circles. When I plugged it back in it immediately went to swimming in circles.

I don't know the mechanics of electricity well enough to understand how or why fish would be effected. But, I have absolutely ZERO doubt that my fish got sick because of stray voltage, which led to deterioration of their health within days. My tang, survived the stress because of his slime coat. He has what I would call burn scars scross the top of his body up to and including his head where is nice sleak black flesh is dulled, faded, like it was definitely scarred. He didn't have that either prior to the electricution. I was saddened that he lost some of his shine.

Now, what I don't know is if the electricity caused neurological damage that the fish couldn't eat, digest, couldn't breathe correctly, etc, which stressed them that they succombed to random parasites, illnesses, viruses, etc. All I know is that my tang, the trooper that he is was without a doubt affected neurologically by the electricity. I repeated the test multiple times because I didn't believe it myself. I thought it was just because he saw me. So I approached the tank differently each time to make sure, is he swimming in circles because he feels like it or because of the electricity. As soon as I unplugged the heater, he started swimming the full length of the tank and acting normal.

Thankfully he was an adult tang or he probably wouldn't have survived. I'm thinking it's body size, slime coat, etc. that protected him. Plus, why would corals put down calcium carbonate skeletons faster, when the water is electrified if it didn't have an effect on the water?

I am open to opposing evidence. The experience I had, maybe a 1 in a million fluke, was very apparent my tang's behavior changed based on electrocution or not. Maybe it's amount of voltage? Or whether the circuit is completely grounded or not? I don't know. Whether all 16 of my fish started with an illness and it was exasperated by electricity? I don't know that either. Chicken or egg....
I understand what you observed with the tang, but the causation isn’t what you think it was, and we aren’t talking about the same issue. There are chemical reactions in the water that occur with actual short circuits in marine tanks. Additionally, the fish can be affected by the current flowing between the negative and positive lines, not to ground. However, that isn’t what people mean when they say stray or induced voltage….what you had was a open short. When people say stray voltage, they are talking about issues ranging from 5 to perhaps 50 VAC. This is measured between the tank and the ground. There is no electrical potential until contact with the ground is made. In your case, if you had put probes in the tank, one side to the other, you would have gotten a reading on a voltmeter. With stray voltage, you would not have gotten any reading.

Stray voltage does NOT cause health issues. My worry is that people then don’t spend the time to determine what the true issue was.

Jay
 
Last edited:
OP
david campbell

david campbell

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Jun 8, 2018
Messages
659
Reaction score
308
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
According to the internet. HAHAHAHAHAHA. People can die from swimming in electrified water. Seems odd, I mean they are floating in the lake just like the fish?

1. Adult swimming in or near water that is electrified, his or her body can become a conductor for that electricity,

2. If you feel a shock, swim away from the dock, helps you remember what to do if you feel tingling or shocks. Yell to others to cut the power source.

3. Electric shock drowning is a term used in the US to describe a cause of death that occurs when swimmers are exposed to electric currents in the water. In some cases the shock itself is fatal,

4. Electrocution in water poses a serious and deadly danger to everyone who swims in a lake or a pool. Tragically, the person becomes a conductor of the electricity as it passes through his or her body. This paralyzes the person’s muscles, rendering him or her unable to swim, which could ultimately cause the person to drown.

IMO here’s my two cents about a grounding rod addition. I am and am not a fan, I know a little about the purpose the rod serves. The water with a grounding probe completes the circuit. The current hits the water and seeks out the closes ground, I believe that if using one of these rods. a sump installation would be best because again; the circuit seeks closes ground and since most of the gear is in the sump, alongside the rod then the fish should be protected, unless it’s a dt wave maker that goes bad. then the fish are toast due to the fact that the current passes thru them ,down into the sump and that would most defiantly kill the fish or anyone at 110-120 v

“A ground rod will prevent a person standing in saltwater from being electrocuted by a “charged” aquarium. But it ensures that all the fish in the tank will be electrocuted in case of a 110-volt power “leak”. If you have a power “leak” the electrical charge can travel through the aquarium and through the fish to the ground, killing the fish. Pick your poison; you being electrocuted in a very rare set of circumstances or your fish being electrocuted in a relatively common set of circumstances.”

again very odd that people are affected by swimming in elec water but not the fish. yall heard this before get out of the water if there is lighting. Again just my two cents spend it as you wish adding to the debate to become better educated.
 
Avast
TSM Aquatics

Do you house a "Reef Safe" Angelfish in your reef tank?

  • YES and it's going good

    Votes: 166 41.3%
  • YES but it's not working out

    Votes: 12 3.0%
  • NO I have tried it in the past and it didn't work out

    Votes: 35 8.7%
  • NO I haven't tried yet

    Votes: 175 43.5%
  • Other (please explain)

    Votes: 14 3.5%

New Posts

Your Reef
Top