Clownfish disease ID (Brook?)

tmcjilton

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Looking for assistance identifying the disease. Had a brook outbreak a long time ago and went fallow a lot longer than recommended. Unfortunately it looks as though I’m going through it again. Aside from corals and inverts, there’s only 2 Ocellaris Clownfish in my DT currently.

Day one in DT saw some spots on both clownfish, day 2-3 spots seemed to be disappearing. Both fish were eating well and looking mostly normal. Fast forward a few days and the smaller of the 2 fish started losing color (only noticeable under white light) and has some large patches of white throughout his body and while it seems very interested in feeding, it doesn’t eat (frozen mix, or pellets). It did have similar spots, but they’re hard to see if they’re still there.

Larger of the 2 is eating just fine but now looks worse. Fish were NOT QT’d. (QT tank sprung a leak days in and haven’t had the time to address the issue)

In my experience with Brook, once I noticed something was off with my clowns, they were covered in mucus the following day and dead within 24 hours. This hasn’t been the case here but I’m still concerned it’s Brook.

Thanks in advance!

Hard to get a good photo, but here is one of the clownfish:
CB3033BE-C92A-4EE2-A828-40E63A37C49B.jpeg
3DC95EA4-657B-4CE9-AF10-76D5EDC5C03F.jpeg
 
AS

vetteguy53081

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Yes- brooklynella At the onset, fish may scrape up against objects, rapid respiration develops, and fish often gasp for air at the surface as the gills become clogged with mucus.1 Very quickly the fish will become lethargic, refuse to eat, and its colors will fade. The most noticeable difference that sets Brooklynella apart from Oodinium is the heavy amount of slime that is produced by a fish that has contracted this parasite. As the disease progresses, a thick whitish mucus covers the body. This will usually start at the head and spread outward across the entire body. Skin lesions appear and it is not uncommon for signs of secondary bacterial infections.
The consensus is that the best and most effective treatment for Brooklynella is formaldehyde alone (API quick cure is good). Typically a standard formalin solution is mixed with either fresh or saltwater in a separate treatment container. Initially, all fish are given a quick dip in the formalin at a higher concentration, followed by continued treatment in a prolonged bath of formalin at a lower concentration in a quarantine tank (QT). Of course, the longer the fish are exposed to the formalin treatment, the more effective it will be at eliminating this disease.
 
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tmcjilton

tmcjilton

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Yes- brooklynella At the onset, fish may scrape up against objects, rapid respiration develops, and fish often gasp for air at the surface as the gills become clogged with mucus.1 Very quickly the fish will become lethargic, refuse to eat, and its colors will fade. The most noticeable difference that sets Brooklynella apart from Oodinium is the heavy amount of slime that is produced by a fish that has contracted this parasite. As the disease progresses, a thick whitish mucus covers the body. This will usually start at the head and spread outward across the entire body. Skin lesions appear and it is not uncommon for signs of secondary bacterial infections.
The consensus is that the best and most effective treatment for Brooklynella is formaldehyde alone (API quick cure is good). Typically a standard formalin solution is mixed with either fresh or saltwater in a separate treatment container. Initially, all fish are given a quick dip in the formalin at a higher concentration, followed by continued treatment in a prolonged bath of formalin at a lower concentration in a quarantine tank (QT). Of course, the longer the fish are exposed to the formalin treatment, the more effective it will be at eliminating this disease.

Thanks
 

IS RTN/STN MORE COMMON THAN IT USED TO BE?

  • Yes! I (and/or my friends) have experienced it more than it used happen.

    Votes: 19 18.6%
  • No. I think it's about the same.

    Votes: 34 33.3%
  • No. It's actually less common than it used to be.

    Votes: 9 8.8%
  • I've never experienced RTN/STN.

    Votes: 12 11.8%
  • What's RTN/STN?

    Votes: 28 27.5%
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