Coral ID?

reefaquatic

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Hey, I'm not sure if I've been looking in the wrong places or what, but I can't find anything that looks like this monster we have in a 220 that my company has been maintaining for ~20 years.

20220518_134333.jpg
 
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reefaquatic

reefaquatic

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Congradulations on such a long lived coral! :D

I'm guessing an Acanthophyllia deshayesiana.
Are they known to grow in colonies? I can't upload any of the HQ pics I have so it's hard to show that there's 4 distinct flattened football-sized lobes to it. Can I post links from external image sources?
 
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reefaquatic

reefaquatic

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A picture of it closed up would be helpful, but I know that may not be practical and whoever is maintaining the system understandably may not want to disturb it. You should be able to post links to external images depending on the hosting sight.
After all of these years, I honestly haven't seen it in the dark. It's unfortunately not open to the public 24/7 and our service hours land us there 11a-2p at the latest. We're actually installing some long-awaited Radion XR30s next week, the left T12 VHO ballast is failing on us and we're finally out of bulbs. Should be able to get some more vibrant pics soon.
 
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Timfish

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Looks like a big maroon, is she as old as the coral? These are guesses but not many corals have such large valleys with multiple polyps (mouths). But besides Acanthophillia maybe a very mature Trachyphillia, Mussa, Symphyllia agaricia or erythraea or maybe Lobophyllia flabelliformis.

I would be very careful changing out the lights and at least initially matching PAR. Corals have decadal memory and a big change even if other specimens of the same species do well.
 
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reefaquatic

reefaquatic

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Looks like a big maroon, is she as old as the coral? These are guesses but not many corals have such large valleys with multiple polyps (mouths). But besides Acanthophillia maybe a very mature Trachyphillia, Mussa, Symphyllia agaricia or erythraea or maybe Lobophyllia flabelliformis.

I would be very careful changing out the lights and at least initially matching PAR. Corals have decadal memory and a big change even if other specimens of the same species do well.
Do you have any suggestions for the light acclimation? I was going to start it out in the 25%-30% range. I'm not certain on the PAR level of the T12s and my experience with LEDs has mostly just been in the last few months. Figure less is better to start, then use the acclimate function in the mobius app over a month or two to raise ~10%.
Also yes! That maroon is about 23, she loves laying on it.
 
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Timfish

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Great job on the Maroon too!

I would want to get some measurement of current lighting considering what a loss it would be to loose such an old coral. If you don't have access to a PAR meter you might try a lux meter. While it looks at a different spectrum than PAR it will still give you an idea of realtive intensity of the T12s you can use to initially set the LEDs. For color initially try to match current apperance, too much blue light initially might bleach the coral as it might not have the flourescing protiens to deal with the stronger blue light.
 
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