Custom Sized ATO Reservoir

Shon

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These are all glpd points. I have to say in the 17 years I've had thus ultra simple gravity float switch method it's failed exactly once. It's a $10 Kent marine float switch and some tubing. That's it.

To your point about the acrylic diy I'm pretty handy but have never looked into making anything with acrylic. Maybe I should. As long as it's lower budget and safe from leaks and breaking it could be a great solution.



I emailed Tenecor right after my post above and they got back to me a few hrs later, after hours. Very impressed. Their prices really are good. They said I can easily drill. But they're on a backorder now. Which is fine no rush here. I might even be able to get the exact custom size I want. If I can for that price of 145 I'd prob go that direction.




Hmmm never thought of water jugs! 6 gallons is too small for me but you got me thinking I might be able to find larger ones and they'd have to be food grade. Thanks!!


Lol. Thanks. Again I'd go with probably less than cabinet grade plywood here. Simplest I can get away with. I'd better start looking at those prices tho.


I'll tell ya I'm always surprised more people don't go gravity fed. The only way it fails is If the float switch is blocked. Same as other atos. But there's no other mechanics or technology to malfunction and get In the way. Other than that one time it's been 100% failsafe for me.

10g NSF/ANSI Std 61, amazon, 90$, 24 x 8.5 x 13

 
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bh750

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I assume you're wanting nicer so can disregard this but, just for budget-minded DIY, I went with:
$13 about 16 gallon, black, polypropylene trash can with set on lid from Target.

Dimensions are 10" x 15" and was about 24" tall before I cut it down to fit where I wanted.

LOL, no actually. Aesthetics dont matter here. I actually looked at similar trashcans from target. My only concern was the materials used and leeching anything into the tank. So have been looking at food grade. With that said....if there's info on those plastics being safe I'd definitely consider. Did you ever look into it?
 

EricR

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LOL, no actually. Aesthetics dont matter here. I actually looked at similar trashcans from target. My only concern was the materials used and leeching anything into the tank. So have been looking at food grade. With that said....if there's info on those plastics being safe I'd definitely consider. Did you ever look into it?
I basically just looked at the recycle code and made sure I got one that at least some consider reef safe. Didn't worry about food grade. Whether or not that was the right way to go about it, I can't say for sure,,, but did it anyway.

Don't take this as FACT but these are the materials I look for in general just based on reading and having at least some often consider them safe...


The following are FDA food safe (used to bottle water):
Recycling code #1 — Polyethylene terephthalate (PET)
Recycling code #2 — High density polyethylene (HDPE)
Recycling code #5 — Polypropylene (PP)
*ideally, labeled FDA “food safe”


Additives like anti-bacterial or maybe even coloring would likely be the biggest concern but unless I see something listed, I just haven't worried about it.
 
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bh750

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I basically just looked at the recycle code and made sure I got one that at least some consider reef safe. Didn't worry about food grade. Whether or not that was the right way to go about it, I can't say for sure,,, but did it anyway.

Don't take this as FACT but these are the materials I look for in general just based on reading and having at least some often consider them safe...


The following are FDA food safe (used to bottle water):
Recycling code #1 — Polyethylene terephthalate (PET)
Recycling code #2 — High density polyethylene (HDPE)
Recycling code #5 — Polypropylene (PP)
*ideally, labeled FDA “food safe”


Additives like anti-bacterial or maybe even coloring would likely be the biggest concern but unless I see something listed, I just haven't worried about it.

Good stuff. Way more than I've done. Now that we're discussing it, whats the best way to confirm if these plastics truly are reef safe? Post something in the chemistry forum? Drive to Randy Holmes Farley's house? :) @Randy Holmes-Farley
 
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bh750

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Just found this definition online. Since I believe everything I read online, I'm inclinded to think this is just fine:


Medium-Density Polyethylene (MDPE) is a thermoplastic that is a part of the polyester family. Like HDPE, MDPE is a linear polymer that is prepared from ethylene by a catalytic process. MDPE, however, is less dense and sensitive and has better stress cracking resistance than HDPE. MDPE is made without branching, which results in a more closely packed structure with a high density and high chemical resistance. MDPE has excellent resistance to diluted and concentrated acids, alcohols, and bases. It has good resistance to aldehydes, esters, aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, ketones, and mineral and vegetable oils. It is excellent for any food-related products and is FDA, NSF, and USDA approved for direct contact.

Some common uses include milk, water, and juice bottles; yogurt and margarine tubs; cereal box liners; and grocery, trash, and retail bags. It is used in bottles for household item such as shampoo, conditioner, detergent, cleaners, etc. It is also used in gas pipes and fittings and screw closures.

MDPE is not known to leach any chemicals that are suspected of causing cancer or disrupting hormones. However, as with many plastic products, if reused multiple times, the chemicals can start to break down over time.

MDPE is commonly recycled and has the number “2” as its recycling symbol.
 

How many different food items do you feed your fish?

  • Only one food

    Votes: 19 5.2%
  • 2 Foods

    Votes: 36 9.8%
  • 3 Foods

    Votes: 89 24.2%
  • 4 Foods

    Votes: 53 14.4%
  • 5+ Different Foods

    Votes: 133 36.1%
  • 10+ Different Foods

    Votes: 38 10.3%
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