Dinos

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Hello all, I just learned (the hard way) that I have ostreopsis dinos and I lost most to all of my snails and most likely my green bta as well. I have taken a quick look at the dino treatment thread however I had trouble figuring out thwart I had to do. Could anyone help me out with a list of things to do and things to get? I also have a now displaced anemone crab and would like to try to keep it alive through the process until I can get another nem and I am looking for tips on that as well. Thanks.
 
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dwest

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If you are using nitrate or phosphate removing methods (gfo, etc) then stop. You will need to add a source of both nitrates and phosphates to get them to measurable levels. Then for ostreopsis, UV works well against them as long as you use one large enough (about 1 watt or larger per 3 gallons), slow enough (2-3 tank volumes per hour flow through the UV), and plum to and from the display. All 3 are important. The UV can be viewed as temporary.
 
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If you are using nitrate or phosphate removing methods (gfo, etc) then stop. You will need to add a source of both nitrates and phosphates to get them to measurable levels. Then for ostreopsis, UV works well against them as long as you use one large enough (about 1 watt or larger per 3 gallons), slow enough (2-3 tank volumes per hour flow through the UV), and plum to and from the display. All 3 are important. The UV can be viewed as temporary.
So what am I looking at on the cost of a UV? I unfortunately don’t have much spare cash right now.
 
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If you are using nitrate or phosphate removing methods (gfo, etc) then stop. You will need to add a source of both nitrates and phosphates to get them to measurable levels. Then for ostreopsis, UV works well against them as long as you use one large enough (about 1 watt or larger per 3 gallons), slow enough (2-3 tank volumes per hour flow through the UV), and plum to and from the display. All 3 are important. The UV can be viewed as temporary.
Is this a good option? Thanks.
 
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sfin52

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If you are using nitrate or phosphate removing methods (gfo, etc) then stop. You will need to add a source of both nitrates and phosphates to get them to measurable levels. Then for ostreopsis, UV works well against them as long as you use one large enough (about 1 watt or larger per 3 gallons), slow enough (2-3 tank volumes per hour flow through the UV), and plum to and from the display. All 3 are important. The UV can be viewed as temporary.
There's another way but it takes a lot of elbow grease and time.
5 micron filter sock (amazon look under food grade I believe its used for brewing).
A 5 gallon bucket and a maxijet pump/ power head.
During the day when dinos are attached to the rocks you siphon them out through the filter sock and pump the water back into the tank. You have to do this more than a few times and get those nitrates and phosphates back up.

Stop running gfo and or carbon dosing.
Do add activated carbon as a filter. It will remove the toxins that dinos can and will release.
 

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There's another way but it takes a lot of elbow grease and time.
5 micron filter sock (amazon look under food grade I believe its used for brewing).
A 5 gallon bucket and a maxijet pump/ power head.
During the day when dinos are attached to the rocks you siphon them out through the filter sock and pump the water back into the tank. You have to do this more than a few times and get those nitrates and phosphates back up.

Stop running gfo and or carbon dosing.
Do add activated carbon as a filter. It will remove the toxins that dinos can and will release.
@sfin52 did the filter sock method work for you? I tried filter socks but any time I got anything fine enough, they would clog extremely fast. It should work, I just was never able to make it happen in a practical application.

@NewReefer2020 I think you’ll need at least 18 watts for a 55 gallon tank. I’ve dealt with bad dinos twice in my 25 or so years of reefing and have read way too much and collaborated with others. The right amount of UV as outlined above works for most ostreopsis problems.

BTW I had BTA’s for about 20 years that were all wiped out with my last bout of dinos. I would deal with them before I ever thought of putting another anemone in the tank. Your crab will be fine I believe (but not a crab expert).

As sfin said, be sure to run granular activated carbon to help reduce Dino toxin. About half a cup in the system replaced weekly for now should help.
 

sfin52

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did the filter sock method work for you? I tried filter socks but any time I got anything fine enough, they would clog extremely fast. It should work, I just was never able to make it happen in a practical application.
Yes but you can't run them as main sock. You have to be intentional about it. Thats what I recommend using a bucket and doing it like that. You could also put the sock in the sump and for go the bucket. You still have to manually siphon through sock.
 
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@sfin52 did the filter sock method work for you? I tried filter socks but any time I got anything fine enough, they would clog extremely fast. It should work, I just was never able to make it happen in a practical application.

@NewReefer2020 I think you’ll need at least 18 watts for a 55 gallon tank. I’ve dealt with bad dinos twice in my 25 or so years of reefing and have read way too much and collaborated with others. The right amount of UV as outlined above works for most ostreopsis problems.

BTW I had BTA’s for about 20 years that were all wiped out with my last bout of dinos. I would deal with them before I ever thought of putting another anemone in the tank. Your crab will be fine I believe (but not a crab expert).

As sfin said, be sure to run granular activated carbon to help reduce Dino toxin. About half a cup in the system replaced weekly for now should help.
Thanks, any recommendation on a uv? I would like it to be around $50 if that is even possible.
 

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Thanks, any recommendation on a uv? I would like it to be around $50 if that is even possible.
The cheaper uv don't do much more than algea. Look at the jeabo pond ones and get a little sized. The dino has to stay in contact with uv for a specific period to kill it.
 
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If you are using nitrate or phosphate removing methods (gfo, etc) then stop. You will need to add a source of both nitrates and phosphates to get them to measurable levels. Then for ostreopsis, UV works well against them as long as you use one large enough (about 1 watt or larger per 3 gallons), slow enough (2-3 tank volumes per hour flow through the UV), and plum to and from the display. All 3 are important. The UV can be viewed as temporary.
+1 to this. Tried and true. Works like a charm.

Might also add some GAC to pull the toxins. Ostreopsis are quite toxic.
 

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A quality UV is very helpful, but they are not cheap. I'd save up for one. In the mean time, I introduce the poor man's UV:

Clamp a bunch of filter floss all over the glass, in high light and flow areas. Remove and rinse every evening before the lights go down. Ostreopsis love this surface area.

Also:
- dose up with food grade sodium nitrate and trisodium phosphate. Mix your own; it is cheap. Be sure to get REAL trisodium phosphate and not TSP substitutes.
- No amino acids. Ever. Again.


IMG-4227.jpg
 

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I would try what @ScottB shows. Quite a good idea.

I have an expensive aqua UV unit now, but ran a jebao, as others have mentioned, for about 6 months. I have not tried a green killing machine but others reported success and might be the most economical option for you. I bet you can find some sort of pet o coupon:

 
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