DIY plans for Stand - need 6ft x 2ft x 35”H

joe-ejs

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Hello. I am looking for where I can find standard plans for a stand made out of 2x4 lumber. I see examples within the posts but am looking for the plans with dimensions. Is there is a specific website or link where prebuilt plans exist? Any help would be appreciated to point be in the right direction.

Also, I after reading the forums, I plan to use the 2x4 and glue and screw them together as needed. Is there a specific quality of 2x4 that I should use in terms of grade?

thanks in advance for any advice..


thanks
 
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CMMorgan

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I do not think anyone ever posted a cut list. You may be on your own there. I just built one recently. You can take a look at my build thread if that helps. Ours is actually utilizing leveling casters. That has been such a help.
 

jgirardnrg

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Hello. I am looking for where I can find standard plans for a stand made out of 2x4 lumber. I see examples within the posts but am looking for the plans with dimensions. Is there is a specific website or link where prebuilt plans exist? Any help would be appreciated to point be in the right direction.

Also, I after reading the forums, I plan to use the 2x4 and glue and screw them together as needed. Is there a specific quality of 2x4 that I should use in terms of grade?

thanks in advance for any advice..


thanks

Get the best 2x4's you can get. Take your time at the store and hand pick each and every one.
 

RocketEngineer

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FECE6CD8-4C8D-4D8B-A896-9DB70760E2F2.jpeg

You want the red and yellow pieces to be 2x8s for a fully open front on a stand that size. The rest can be 2x4. The link to the RC page has the math on the very first page. HTH
 
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joe-ejs

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FECE6CD8-4C8D-4D8B-A896-9DB70760E2F2.jpeg

You want the red and yellow pieces to be 2x8s for a fully open front on a stand that size. The rest can be 2x4. The link to the RC page has the math on the very first page. HTH
FECE6CD8-4C8D-4D8B-A896-9DB70760E2F2.jpeg

You want the red and yellow pieces to be 2x8s for a fully open front on a stand that size. The rest can be 2x4. The link to the RC page has the math on the very first page. HTH
Rocket engineer,

quick question..so I decided on a 5ft SCA tank instead. So with that said, should I downgrade the red and yellow sections to be 2x6 with the assumption still no front brace or should I stick with 2x8?
Thanks!
FECE6CD8-4C8D-4D8B-A896-9DB70760E2F2.jpeg

You want the red and yellow pieces to be 2x8s for a fully open front on a stand that size. The rest can be 2x4. The link to the RC page has the math on the very first page. HTH
Harlow Rocketengineer
 

NabberNate

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I have a sketch up plan I could send you for a general idea of the framing but you would need to customize for length and height.

A couple of things to consider:
1) I put black window foam under the base of my stand to soak up any construction and or flooring imperfections so my stand was effectively touching the ground at all points.
2) Consider the exact place you are putting your stand and that floors (even basement) aren't always level. I had more than a quarter of an inch from left to right across 60" that I had to deal with by making one side longer than the other. More important for a rimless / eurobraced but still a good practice.
3) Regarding the design above in colors I think a 2x8 in pine is a little overkill and it will limit your ability to work above a sump. I would go smaller and if you're a little nervous go with poplar instead as it is stronger than pine and won't break your bank something hard like maple. Still nervous double up. I actually chose poplar boards for the framing with a very very slight bow (~1/8") and installed convex. With the added weight of water and rock it flattened out just perfect. I did have vertical supports across the back just not the front.
4) Consider your overflow and make sure cross braces (i recommend 3) don't interfere with piping.
5) Regarding cross braces, using a router to cut a groove and then using a router to round over your brace is a very strong method for supporting.
6) The biggest risk of a stand failing is not likely going to be the wood buckling under the weight it is going to be sides not securely fastened to front / back and a chance for it pulling away or it's going to be a stand that is not level putting extra stress on your tank either cracking or slowly pulling away silicone seal.

20210506_124458.jpg 20210506_124420.jpg
 
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joe-ejs

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I have a sketch up plan I could send you for a general idea of the framing but you would need to customize for length and height.

A couple of things to consider:
1) I put black window foam under the base of my stand to soak up any construction and or flooring imperfections so my stand was effectively touching the ground at all points.
2) Consider the exact place you are putting your stand and that floors (even basement) aren't always level. I had more than a quarter of an inch from left to right across 60" that I had to deal with by making one side longer than the other. More important for a rimless / eurobraced but still a good practice.
3) Regarding the design above in colors I think a 2x8 in pine is a little overkill and it will limit your ability to work above a sump. I would go smaller and if you're a little nervous go with poplar instead as it is stronger than pine and won't break your bank something hard like maple. Still nervous double up. I actually chose poplar boards for the framing with a very very slight bow (~1/8") and installed convex. With the added weight of water and rock it flattened out just perfect. I did have vertical supports across the back just not the front.
4) Consider your overflow and make sure cross braces (i recommend 3) don't interfere with piping.
5) Regarding cross braces, using a router to cut a groove and then using a router to round over your brace is a very strong method for supporting.
6) The biggest risk of a stand failing is not likely going to be the wood buckling under the weight it is going to be sides not securely fastened to front / back and a chance for it pulling away or it's going to be a stand that is not level putting extra stress on your tank either cracking or slowly pulling away silicone seal.

20210506_124458.jpg 20210506_124420.jpg
I have a sketch up plan I could send you for a general idea of the framing but you would need to customize for length and height.

A couple of things to consider:
1) I put black window foam under the base of my stand to soak up any construction and or flooring imperfections so my stand was effectively touching the ground at all points.
2) Consider the exact place you are putting your stand and that floors (even basement) aren't always level. I had more than a quarter of an inch from left to right across 60" that I had to deal with by making one side longer than the other. More important for a rimless / eurobraced but still a good practice.
3) Regarding the design above in colors I think a 2x8 in pine is a little overkill and it will limit your ability to work above a sump. I would go smaller and if you're a little nervous go with poplar instead as it is stronger than pine and won't break your bank something hard like maple. Still nervous double up. I actually chose poplar boards for the framing with a very very slight bow (~1/8") and installed convex. With the added weight of water and rock it flattened out just perfect. I did have vertical supports across the back just not the front.
4) Consider your overflow and make sure cross braces (i recommend 3) don't interfere with piping.
5) Regarding cross braces, using a router to cut a groove and then using a router to round over your brace is a very strong method for supporting.
6) The biggest risk of a stand failing is not likely going to be the wood buckling under the weight it is going to be sides not securely fastened to front / back and a chance for it pulling away or it's going to be a stand that is not level putting extra stress on your tank either cracking or slowly pulling away silicone seal.

20210506_124458.jpg 20210506_124420.jpg
Hi Nabbernate
thanks for the great information. I decided to go with 2x6’s for the top frame. I will get t he window foam also.

so what size screws did you use? I plan on either 2 1/2” or 3” but also see they come in size 8/9/10 and I am not sure which to use..I guess I will google it also

lastly..curious what height you made your stand ..I am debating between 38 and 40 for viewing at a seated level...interested to hear what you did..thanks!
 

NabberNate

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Mostly I used Kreg 1.5" hardwood screws with pocket holes because the true support of my stand is wood on top of other wood meaning I'm not relying on any butt joints anywhere for support. Additionally the shell (exterior) of my stand is a part of my support frame so mostly I have 3/4 hardwood. If you're fastening one 2x4 to another though can't go wrong with these guys.


My stand is at 36". It's the right height for my sump which is a 75 gallon DIY tank but I feel like it's sometime a little low if I'm standing and a little high if I'm sitting. It's perfect for causally looking at across the room but to sit or stand and stare for a while (which I like to do) one way or the other would be better.

20210506_173947.jpg
 
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joe-ejs

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Hi NabberNate

thanks for the info. I think 36” is what I will do. Also, how did you secure the (3) 2x4”’s in each corner? Just to the internal 2/4?

also I was a little confused on what you are routing on the cross braces ..are you basically rounding the edges where it meets the front and back cross beams?
 

Lost in the Sauce

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Is there a specific quality of 2x4 that I should use in terms of grade?

thanks in advance for any advice..


thanks
Yes and very good question. Grading of 2x4 lumber changes from location to location.

You want Kiln Dried, 2x4's with the least (none preferred) amount of knots or imperfections. You're going to need to hand pick these. Pull off one from the stack and look down it from two directions confirming it is straight as straight can get for at least six feet. Down stack as many as you need to find how many sticks you need then add a few more.

When you're done make sure to neatly stack the pile back up for the next guy.
 

NabberNate

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Hi NabberNate

thanks for the info. I think 36” is what I will do. Also, how did you secure the (3) 2x4”’s in each corner? Just to the internal 2/4?

also I was a little confused on what you are routing on the cross braces ..are you basically rounding the edges where it meets the front and back cross beams?
For the router I think you got it. First I used a 3/4" straight bit and made a vertical groove about 2" long from the top of the 2x4. It stops 1.5" inches from the bottom if you do the math and is a half circle ending. Some might chisel that out to be square and drop in a piece of wood but it is stronger and less likely to split the wood if you use a 3/8" round over bit on just the very end of both sides of your cross brace thereby making a half circle to fill in the gap nicely.

The concept of mating rounded edges actually was used in log cabins as the pressure is more evenly distributed.

For the corners I'll try to get a picture later but I had an outer shell and an inner frame and both of these sat under my cabinet top. The inner frame was really just front and back so there wasn't 3 boards in each corner for the frame just 2. Each horizontal beam sat on top of the vertical corners and was fastened with pocket holes. This is plenty strong but prone to wobble so to lock in the top the front and back frame screwed up into the top again using pocket holes to keep things from moving around.

20210130_201829.jpg 20210130_203341.jpg
 
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Gtinnel

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I think 36” is what I will do. Also, how did you secure the (3) 2x4”’s in each corner? Just to the internal 2/4?
I strongly recommend when deciding the height of the stand consider how much height it will give you under the stand for installing/accessing your skimmer (if you are using a skimmer). I made mine just barely tall enough for my skimmer and now it is a pain to clean. Also for the supports in each corner (the purple boards in rocketenginners design) just get screwed to the inside (green) boards.
For the screws in mine I used 3" deck screws, you should use at least close to 3" screws if you are going to use butt joints.
 

galantra

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Mostly I used Kreg 1.5" hardwood screws with pocket holes because the true support of my stand is wood on top of other wood meaning I'm not relying on any butt joints anywhere for support. Additionally the shell (exterior) of my stand is a part of my support frame so mostly I have 3/4 hardwood. If you're fastening one 2x4 to another though can't go wrong with these guys.


My stand is at 36". It's the right height for my sump which is a 75 gallon DIY tank but I feel like it's sometime a little low if I'm standing and a little high if I'm sitting. It's perfect for causally looking at across the room but to sit or stand and stare for a while (which I like to do) one way or the other would be better.

20210506_173947.jpg

How is that light being held?
 

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idea was stolen from this gun

 

NabberNate

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How is that light being held?
3 of .25 x 3. 5" spax structural screws. I put an angle bracket on the inside but it really didn't do much. I have a little sag so if I get the ambition one day I'll take it down and taper the back a little maybe 87.5° instead of 90.

20210410_135553.jpg 20210410_135624.jpg 20210410_135541.jpg
 
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joe-ejs

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For the router I think you got it. First I used a 3/4" straight bit and made a vertical groove about 2" long from the top of the 2x4. It stops 1.5" inches from the bottom if you do the math and is a half circle ending. Some might chisel that out to be square and drop in a piece of wood but it is stronger and less likely to split the wood if you use a 3/8" round over bit on just the very end of both sides of your cross brace thereby making a half circle to fill in the gap nicely.

The concept of mating rounded edges actually was used in log cabins as the pressure is more evenly distributed.

For the corners I'll try to get a picture later but I had an outer shell and an inner frame and both of these sat under my cabinet top. The inner frame was really just front and back so there wasn't 3 boards in each corner for the frame just 2. Each horizontal beam sat on top of the vertical corners and was fastened with pocket holes. This is plenty strong but prone to wobble so to lock in the top the front and back frame screwed up into the top again using pocket holes to keep things from moving around.

20210130_201829.jpg 20210130_203341.jpg
This looks awesome. I started mine today and it is square as square can be. Took my time through everything and glued the joints and then screwed them togethr. Currently I have no back support but may add one yet. I went with 2x6 upper base.

I was going to wrap with plywood and then cut out the cabinet openings but I think I maybe wrap it with trim pieces to accommodate the doors that I will have in the front and both sides, with 2x4’s all around, I am going to use the open areas on the sides for door access. Do you see any issue with this plan?
 
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