Favorite Live Rock: Fiji, Pukani, Tonga, Gulf, Artificial, Aquacultured or Other?

BRS

What is your favorite type of live rock?

  • Fiji Live Rock

    Votes: 89 22.7%
  • Tonga Branch Live Rock

    Votes: 48 12.2%
  • Pukani Live Rock

    Votes: 89 22.7%
  • Gulf Live Rock

    Votes: 25 6.4%
  • Artificial (man-made or synthetic) Live Rock

    Votes: 69 17.6%
  • Aquacultured Live Rock

    Votes: 46 11.7%
  • Other (please explain in the thread)

    Votes: 26 6.6%

  • Total voters
    392

jda

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You cannot just start with a few pieces of live rock if the rest of your stuff is full of terrestrial bound phosphate with the pores filled with organics. There is more to live rock than just the fauna on the surface.
 

ClownWrangler

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Really not my situation and I am discussing adding a few pieces to a fairly stable established Algae free tank. I might talk to KP Aquatics by phone and see what they have to say.
You referenced people failing with dry rock. Were they adding dry rock to an already established aquarium? likely not. It would seem to me dry rock is a no brainer in your situation if you already have an established system. Why risk introducing pests and breaking something that does not need fixed. Live rock doesn't filter anything BTW. That's a misnomer. It cant remove nitrates. It cant remove phosphates. If these people you speak of were expecting it, perhaps lack of knowledge is why their tanks failed. In terms of "filtration", Rock just hosts nitrifying bacteria that converts Ammonia to nitrates. A plie of Legos in the aquarium could achieve that, so the "failures" you mention have nothing to do with the fact that they started with dry rock unless they failed to allow the tank to cycle before adding fish, or increased the bio load too quickly. I see association that does not translate to causation in your reference and I don't see how it relates to your situation.
 
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ClownWrangler

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You cannot just start with a few pieces of live rock if the rest of your stuff is full of terrestrial bound phosphate with the pores filled with organics. There is more to live rock than just the fauna on the surface.

This whole thing with people saying "you cant do that!" to a plethora of people who have done it with success is really getting old. There are less kind, more accurate words to describe it, but I'll be nice. Here are just a few pieces of "dry" rock that were thrown in my tank with a single piece of live rock. The tank is only a year old. There's even coralline on the snails. Lol. Yes, live rock is just about the living things on it. If you think the rock itself is actually alive, perhaps you should lay off the drugs. A long soak in DI water will leach out enough of the organics and phosphates you speak of to where they wont be detrimental unless its actually rock comprised of harmful minerals, which is easy to avoid. Either way, chaeto will remove phosphates and nitrates faster than they can be released.

20210706_202924.jpg 20210706_202434.jpg
 
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srad750c

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I have Gulf rock with Fiji rock from my original tank in 1994, if I could start over with real rock, I would go with Fiji and Tonga this go around. Gulf rock is too dense and heavy for my ideas this go around.
 

Bouncingsoul39

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most of this list aren’t even available to the consumer any more. i chose florida’s gulf rock cause it’s the only legit ocean live rock left that i could find.
BRS killed the live rock industry. it was an LFS staple money maker and no one would order it from them and their dry rock rarely sold so they made a fear based propaganda video about how horrible it is. ryan told me it didn’t sell for them. managing lfs for years i know it always sold awesome for us and was profitable to the point it helped us keep in business over other items.

really sucks because live rock makes reef keeping way easier and natural. i’ll never deal with dry rock again. twice nothing but dinos and cyano issues. hope this hobby gets back around to culture ocean rock. many people got frustrated and gave up after their tanks were failing. thanks brs.
 

ClownWrangler

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most of this list aren’t even available to the consumer any more. i chose florida’s gulf rock cause it’s the only legit ocean live rock left that i could find.
BRS killed the live rock industry. it was an LFS staple money maker and no one would order it from them and their dry rock rarely sold so they made a fear based propaganda video about how horrible it is. ryan told me it didn’t sell for them. managing lfs for years i know it always sold awesome for us and was profitable to the point it helped us keep in business over other items.

really sucks because live rock makes reef keeping way easier and natural. i’ll never deal with dry rock again. twice nothing but dinos and cyano issues. hope this hobby gets back around to culture ocean rock. many people got frustrated and gave up after their tanks were failing. thanks brs.


If 1000 people are successful at something and you only focus on the 10% that failed, then you will fail. How about focusing on the people that started with dry rock and were successful instead of the ones who failed. Just a suggestion. I agree that harvesting live rock from reefs should not be outright banned, but saying that live rock is the only way to be successful is a blatant lie. The cyano and dinos you speak of are just phases that tend to pass. Patience is key. I've never had dynos, but the cyano was never a big deal.
 

Bouncingsoul39

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The cyano and dinos you speak of are just phases that tend to pass. Patience is key. I've never had dynos, but the cyano was never a big deal.
Not interested in your suggestions. You just pulled those percentages out of your rear. Dinos are not a phase and never were part of it until dry rock became prevalent.
I never said it was the only way to go. I said it’s the best way, because it is, and I know this from my long and vast experience in the hobby.
You’ve been around one year and your going to lecture me? Go away.
 

ClownWrangler

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Not interested in your suggestions. You just pulled those percentages out of your rear. Dinos are not a phase and never were part of it until dry rock became prevalent.
I never said it was the only way to go. I said it’s the best way, because it is, and I know this from my long and vast experience in the hobby.
You’ve been around one year and your going to lecture me? Go away.
You are correct, the failure rate is likely much lower than 10% and there are way more than 1000 people who have been successful. It was obviously a hypothetical. Being more experienced at failure dose not make you my better. Tone it down. Forums are not for people with closed minds. And just because this particular tank is only a year old, it does not mean I only have a year of experience in the hobby.
 
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sarahgo

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I used to love Pukani. My previous tanks had it. I understand it’s not good to keep taking from the ocean, so I do my part. From my current tanks, the 20 was done with man made, the purple reef saver. My current Nuvo 75EXT build (will be posting a thread from start to finish here soon) was done with dry Marco rock. I really loved the ability to make it my own without being rushed. I used super glue and mortar, and it turned out EXACTLY the way I wanted. Can’t say I’ve ever been happier with an aquascape ❤️

1516A097-4C66-4F52-BB7A-25DBD84A5AAC.jpeg D743790A-5EC8-47D3-A97B-9BE28C2A6CAF.jpeg BF463D23-F587-4D2B-9197-EB2C9415AD95.jpeg F7F0647F-F2A7-4C59-B0C2-3910FA4C3CDB.jpeg A2B2E6D5-F993-4544-BE67-9A27CFF9680B.jpeg
 
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ClownWrangler

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Dinos are not a phase and never were part of it until dry rock became prevalent.

So basically, dinoflagellates didn't exist in reef tanks until they were introduced on dead rock? Yea. Ok. That makes sense. You are wise beyond your years. Sorry, allow me to be more specific, dinoflagellate outbreaks come and go and not all people who start with dry rocks have issues with them.

Fun fact: dinoflagellates are what make your corals photosynthetic.
 
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iggy

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You referenced people failing with dry rock. Were they adding dry rock to an already established aquarium? likely not. It would seem to me dry rock is a no brainer in your situation if you already have an established system. Why risk introducing pests and breaking something that does not need fixed. Live rock doesn't filter anything BTW. That's a misnomer. It cant remove nitrates. It cant remove phosphates. If these people you speak of were expecting it, perhaps lack of knowledge is why their tanks failed. In terms of "filtration", Rock just hosts nitrifying bacteria that converts Ammonia to nitrates. A plie of Legos in the aquarium could achieve that, so the "failures" you mention have nothing to do with the fact that they started with dry rock unless they failed to allow the tank to cycle before adding fish, or increased the bio load too quickly. I see association that does not translate to causation in your reference and I don't see how it relates to your situation.
The failures I am speaking of were advanced aquarists as I mentioned. The guests on the youtube channel were Sanjay Gupta and Mike Palleta. They both had a failed tank that would not grow SPS they attributed to dead rock. They added bacteria and finally took down both tanks and restarted with live rock.

Mine is working but hardly impressive compared to past results as I mentioned with actual live rock. I will try legos next instead?
 

N.Sreefer

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Had to say other because I LOVE maricultured rock straight from the ocean but its near impossible to get in canada with permits and cites restrictions. So I'm stuck with my old maricultured rock that's been moved many times and hasn't been in the ocean for 8 years at least. That and base rock. Anyone try Derek's reef shops rock (Newbrunswick)?
 

iggy

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You are correct, the failure rate is likely much lower than 10% and there are way more than 1000 people who have been successful. It was obviously a hypothetical. Being more experienced at failure dose not make you my better. Tone it down. Forums are not for people with closed minds. And just because this particular tank is only a year old, it does not mean I only have a year of experience in the hobby.
Dinos and all other phases can happen with old tank rock, dead rock, and live rock. It is a certainty. It really comes down to if you accept being forced to use dead rock and LEDs long term. My experiences is it is a lot easier with live rock and metal halides. You need to expect a new aquarist to accept mediocre results. for a year.

The only certain statistic is most do not stay around for two years. If you read this discussion from front to back I can see why.
 

RichReef

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Still have my Fiji, Tonga, and Fiji plates from a purchase I made 8 years ago. About 200 lbs. My temporary tank has Caribsea rock ATM.

The Fiji is in brute cans right now filled with RO that I have been changing once a month for 2 years now.

My new build should start this year sometime and I'll dry it, scape it, cure it.

I feel very fortunate to have this rock. There are some really nice pieces.
 

sarahgo

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The failures I am speaking of were advanced aquarists as I mentioned. The guests on the youtube channel were Sanjay Gupta and Mike Palleta. They both had a failed tank that would not grow SPS they attributed to dead rock. They added bacteria and finally took down both tanks and restarted with live rock.

Mine is working but hardly impressive compared to past results as I mentioned with actual live rock. I will try legos next instead?
Interesting, that would suck. I had a 120 in Texas that I started with dead rock and sand. Most successful tank I ever had. Not an algae bloom or pest as far as the eye could see. I did a mixed reef in that tank, but I also let it cycle for 1 year before I added anything alive. My success is why I started my new tank with the same concept. I’d be interested to hear what they did. Now I’m a little unnerved at my decision to do it again. :(.
 

Forty-Two

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My favorite is lava rocks. I got mine at a landscape supply company for 17 cents a pound. Oddly enough, I couldn't get it as live rock.

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3 years later.

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Whats the general consensus on lava rock? Ive heard some say it has too much iron (if I recall correctly) in it and is a risk. Obviously this tank looks great - but perhaps it was just a low metal batch?

It sounds like a great option, but perhaps a bit risky.
 

sarahgo

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Whats the general consensus on lava rock? Ive heard some say it has too much iron (if I recall correctly) in it and is a risk. Obviously this tank looks great - but perhaps it was just a low metal batch?

It sounds like a great option, but perhaps a bit risky.
Interested. I’ve only ever seen lava rock in freshwater tanks. Not sure why.
 
BRS

How long does it take to you to get an inch of acropora growth? (on average)

  • A couple of weeks or less

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Up to 1 month

    Votes: 4 7.5%
  • Up to 2 months

    Votes: 4 7.5%
  • Up to 3 months

    Votes: 9 17.0%
  • Up to 6 months

    Votes: 10 18.9%
  • Up to 12 months

    Votes: 6 11.3%
  • 12+ Months

    Votes: 1 1.9%
  • I can't grow acropora

    Votes: 16 30.2%
  • Other (please explain)

    Votes: 3 5.7%
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