AquaCave
OP
OldRed1

OldRed1

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Mar 4, 2022
Messages
439
Reaction score
564
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
New York
I bit the bullet on some inverts. I have a few small aiptasia in my live rock, so I bought two peppermint shrimp from my LfS. While I was there, I also bought two cleaner shrimp, two emerald crabs, and a humorously large purple short spine urchin. I may ultimately ask to exchange this urchin because it is much larger than I realized! She all ready mowed down two large pieces of seaweed and shows no signs of slowing!

90062778-2BCF-4941-9FB2-E5C9ED2E4305.jpeg


753AC2A9-CE2C-4043-A6D9-79E878523D6A.jpeg


12A1FE55-EBF5-40EA-83E0-C4739A1F6EBA.jpeg
 
World Wide Corals
Zoanthids.com
OP
OldRed1

OldRed1

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Mar 4, 2022
Messages
439
Reaction score
564
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
New York
Ursula is doing well. We had much better success today binding the seaweed to a rock with a rubber band. The tank was a little bit cleaner using this method, but not by much. Once the next set of live rock comes we’ll all be much better off, since that rock should have a great abundance of algae for her to munch on.


Nessy, our nassarius snail, is also doing well! She’s finally started to burrow under the sand, which is much needed. I’ll likely grab one or two more of these sandmowers for the tank.


Lastly, our little porcelain crab made an appearance tonight. We first spotted her the first night we added the live sand and rock. About a week ago, we saw a similar shell floating around the tank and thought that she had died. Turns out that she was just molting! This little crab is honestly my favorite tank inhabitant. The shell she carries always seems a little too big, but she wears it well!

 
First Choice Sale
OP
OldRed1

OldRed1

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Mar 4, 2022
Messages
439
Reaction score
564
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
New York
@LiverockRocks Looks like our friend Sally is a Shellback Crab. Huge thanks to @ISpeakForTheSeas for helping us to ID this adorable hitchhiker. This could be a great addition to the roster of hitchhikers on the TBS website!



Shellback Crab.jpeg
 

LiverockRocks

Gulf of Mexico Living Rock Farmers
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Apr 6, 2021
Messages
214
Reaction score
523
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Tampa
Tidal Gardens
OP
OldRed1

OldRed1

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Mar 4, 2022
Messages
439
Reaction score
564
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
New York

ISpeakForTheSeas

Valuable Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Nov 22, 2021
Messages
1,140
Reaction score
1,403
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
United States
IMG_5793.jpg
@ISpeakForTheSeas Do you know the scientific name?
I know there are at least three species of shellbacks in Florida: Hypoconcha arcuata, H. spinosissima, and H. parasitica. Based on the photo there, I would guess H. arcuata or H. spinosissima. I'm leaning toward H. arcuata in this pic, but the differences are subtle to my untrained eye. With regards to differentiating H. arcuata from H. spinosissima: "This species does not have the strong postorbital spine or the spines on the frontal margin of the carapace as found on H. spinosissima."

Quote from page 77 of the PDF linked below:
 
OP
OldRed1

OldRed1

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Mar 4, 2022
Messages
439
Reaction score
564
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
New York
I know there are at least three species of shellbacks in Florida: Hypoconcha arcuata, H. spinosissima, and H. parasitica. Based on the photo there, I would guess H. arcuata or H. spinosissima. I'm leaning toward H. arcuata in this pic, but the differences are subtle to my untrained eye. With regards to differentiating H. arcuata from H. spinosissima: "This species does not have the strong postorbital spine or the spines on the frontal margin of the carapace as found on H. spinosissima."

Quote from page 77 of the PDF linked below:
Thank you for posting this PDF! What a great resource! I’ll be taking delivery of more TBS live rock next week, and I’ll use this document to help ID the newest hitchhikers!
 
World Wide Corals

ISpeakForTheSeas

Valuable Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Nov 22, 2021
Messages
1,140
Reaction score
1,403
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
United States
The document linked here gives a lot of great information.

Forgot it had ID info in that link too:
"Among the three mentioned species, Hypoconcha spinosissima is very interesting as it has several spines distributed on the body that may be seen in ventral view. Thus, one can easily recognize H. spinosissima by searching for the spines on the chelipeds (first claw) or covering the ventral portion of the carapace. These features can be seen even in a very small juvenile."
 

ISpeakForTheSeas

Valuable Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Nov 22, 2021
Messages
1,140
Reaction score
1,403
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
United States
@ISpeakForTheSeas So, it seems we have a second crab in the tank! I went through the PDF you shared to try and identify, but didn’t see anything that matched close enough to positively ID. Any thoughts?

Unfortunately no. As I mentioned in the other thread, I'm actually not very good with ID'ing crabs. I recognized the shellback because of it's visible, unique behavior (the wearing of the bivalve shell). Without some clearly distinctive, visible attribute like that, I'm afraid I'm at a loss with crabs.
 
Never Wash Another Nasty Filter Sock Again!
OP
OldRed1

OldRed1

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Mar 4, 2022
Messages
439
Reaction score
564
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
New York
I knew it would happen eventually, but the outcome is no less sad. I have officially lost my first tank mate; one of the emerald crabs died at some point during the night. I bought two emerald crabs to keep a patch of green hair algae from expanding, and I suspect there wasn’t enough viable algae in the tank to keep both crabs alive.

In a fascinating display of ecosystem optimization, Nessy (the Nassarius snail) and Ursula (the urchin) were each quick to move on the dead crab. Within just a few hours, all evidence of the crab was completely erased. Fascinating to watch, if not in a macabre way.

F23427F1-8291-4885-9751-A4C03A02A617.jpeg
 
OP
OldRed1

OldRed1

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Mar 4, 2022
Messages
439
Reaction score
564
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
New York
Feeding time with Ursula, Nessy, Pain, and Panic!


@Parsely, if it eases your worry about your own Nassarius snail, this is the first time I’ve seen Nessy since Saturday.
 
AquaCave Logo Banner
OP
OldRed1

OldRed1

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Mar 4, 2022
Messages
439
Reaction score
564
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
New York
Before I say anything else, I just want to wish our friends down at @LiverockRocks the best as they prep for the hurricane. Hope you all stay safe as best you can.

Today, my second order of salt water from TBS arrived. I’ll post a longer review later with more detailed pictures, but I wanted to share this video ASAP so that they could see how beautiful their rock has made my aquascape.

 
OP
OldRed1

OldRed1

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Mar 4, 2022
Messages
439
Reaction score
564
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
New York
It’s hard to describe to non-reefers how much joy it brings me to see our little porcelain crab friend. After a day when there was so much disruption in the tank, I am grateful that our crab friend survived.

35BC559F-11EC-4268-B7C5-869C7624607D.jpeg


A2199F5A-63BE-450F-B415-79941F8391C4.jpeg
 
AquaCave

Do you have any special reefing plans for the fall season?

  • YES (tell us about it in the thread)

    Votes: 45 35.2%
  • NO

    Votes: 58 45.3%
  • Maybe

    Votes: 19 14.8%
  • It's not fall where I'm from!

    Votes: 6 4.7%
NicerReefs. Your Reef. But Nicer.
Top