Get at these quickly!

PacificEastAquaculture

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SALE on WYSIWYG Clams
Limited availability!

When these sell out it will be a while before we get more because of the current international flight restrictions.

DON'T BE DISAPPOINTED
BUY NOW!


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Franklin West

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These clams are soooo awesome!! How long should your tank be setup before you are ready to buy a clam? 6 months, 1 year? I really want one.
 

esther

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These clams are soooo awesome!! How long should your tank be setup before you are ready to buy a clam? 6 months, 1 year? I really want one.
Depends on how stable your tank is. We've had ours for two months and just added our clam. It's super healthy. Check out my Instagram or build thread if you want to see photos. Def get one!
 
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PacificEastAquaculture

PacificEastAquaculture

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I have handled many thousands of clams over the last 20 years that Pacific East Aquaculture has been in business. If you have any questions regarding clam care please email us and check out some of my YouTube videos-these will visually address most issues. The following information is based on my experiences of handling all types of clams. I have set up clam farms in remote countries and collected many wild clams.


My experience is that clams are relatively hardy and easy to keep.

In the wild they generally are attached or embedded in rock in areas with clear water with rapid water flow and intense light. So, they need a firm surface to attach and must not be allowed to fall over.

They are usually found no more than 6 feet below the surface. Whether the clam is cultured or wild collected you should look to it's natural wild habitat to replicate in your tank. Having said this, some things can be altered in your tank to compensate for not having the exact conditions they are found in the wild. For example, while these clams are use to very intense light in the wild, same holds true for cultured as well as wild, they can be kept under relatively lower light levels in your tank because they also derive nutrition from dissolved organics in addition to products from photosynthesis.

I have found that clams are sensitive to alkalinity swings, just as some corals are. This seems especially true in tanks with low nutrient levels. I like to maintain alkalinity at about 7.5-7.7 dKH. There are many divergent opinions on this subject. Stability is important.

Be sure no corals can sting them and no inverts or fish bother them.

It is essential that they do not fall over or fall off rockwork. Put them in the preferred area and leave them alone.

When acclimating, please do not over-acclimate! I hear folks acclimating for many hours, this is not necessary and can be detrimental. Usually a steady drip for about 45 mins is adequate. Carefully examine the shell and brush it with a toothbrush thoroughly in a separate container. Parasitic pyramid snails and their eggs hide in the crevices of the shell.
20190228_110707~2.jpg
20190228_105005~2.jpg


Not much is known about diseases of clams. Some parasites are known, but generally a clam can look great one day, not opening much the next, and dead the following. Freshwater dips have been suggested as a treatment, this can be stressful to the clam but can also save some clams. You can put the clam into a container with freshwater the same temp and pH of your tank, for 15 mins every other day for 3 treatments. Wild collected clams from specific locals are infected with microscopic parasites and I do not bring in clams from those locations, freshwater dips have not been found to treat these infections, but have been found to help some clams. Use freshwater dips with caution.

Supplemental feeding is not needed, although as previously mentioned, higher nutrient levels are beneficial so feed your tank well.
 

saf1

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I have handled many thousands of clams over the last 20 years that Pacific East Aquaculture has been in business. If you have any questions regarding clam care please email us and check out some of my YouTube videos-these will visually address most issues. The following information is based on my experiences of handling all types of clams. I have set up clam farms in remote countries and collected many wild clams.


My experience is that clams are relatively hardy and easy to keep.

In the wild they generally are attached or embedded in rock in areas with clear water with rapid water flow and intense light. So, they need a firm surface to attach and must not be allowed to fall over.

They are usually found no more than 6 feet below the surface. Whether the clam is cultured or wild collected you should look to it's natural wild habitat to replicate in your tank. Having said this, some things can be altered in your tank to compensate for not having the exact conditions they are found in the wild. For example, while these clams are use to very intense light in the wild, same holds true for cultured as well as wild, they can be kept under relatively lower light levels in your tank because they also derive nutrition from dissolved organics in addition to products from photosynthesis.

I have found that clams are sensitive to alkalinity swings, just as some corals are. This seems especially true in tanks with low nutrient levels. I like to maintain alkalinity at about 7.5-7.7 dKH. There are many divergent opinions on this subject. Stability is important.

Be sure no corals can sting them and no inverts or fish bother them.

It is essential that they do not fall over or fall off rockwork. Put them in the preferred area and leave them alone.

When acclimating, please do not over-acclimate! I hear folks acclimating for many hours, this is not necessary and can be detrimental. Usually a steady drip for about 45 mins is adequate. Carefully examine the shell and brush it with a toothbrush thoroughly in a separate container. Parasitic pyramid snails and their eggs hide in the crevices of the shell.
20190228_110707~2.jpg
20190228_105005~2.jpg


Not much is known about diseases of clams. Some parasites are known, but generally a clam can look great one day, not opening much the next, and dead the following. Freshwater dips have been suggested as a treatment, this can be stressful to the clam but can also save some clams. You can put the clam into a container with freshwater the same temp and pH of your tank, for 15 mins every other day for 3 treatments. Wild collected clams from specific locals are infected with microscopic parasites and I do not bring in clams from those locations, freshwater dips have not been found to treat these infections, but have been found to help some clams. Use freshwater dips with caution.

Supplemental feeding is not needed, although as previously mentioned, higher nutrient levels are beneficial so feed your tank well.
If you don't mind me Dr. Mac - I book marked your video. This answered 99% of my questions regarding acclimation and handling. 8 minutes - well worth it if you are a first time clam purchaser.

 

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