Hammer coral is dying?!

Terri Caton

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Mine are doing that too right now. It's a last ditch effort for them to survive. Just got this tank that was being neglected. Tested water and the Mg is >2000. Apparently stress and this value is causing it. Major water change tomorrow.

Not saying Mg is why yours is doing it. Just what I've found in my tank.
 

Centerline

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My hammer coral is dying it looks like and I am very concerned about my yellow clown goby picking at it, is this normal? When I first got my hammer it opened up beautifully and now I don’t know what is going on...


Consider that only one out of four heads are doing so poorly. Let me suggest that although the advice regarding ammonia is spot on, you may have some sort of parasite such as flat worms on that particular head. Infestations manifest exactly like this fairly often so dipping with Coral Rx or Prime, etc may help. I personally have seen flatworms a half inch long pop out of hammers that were failing when dipped. Good luck.
 

Jeeperz

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If, it's a parasite, I recommend Bayer dips over all else. Coral rx is just too harsh. On the ammonia, add biospira, like yesterday. Prime may help, but the one time I did use it I lost a fish during a move.
 
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Greenebean04

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Consider that only one out of four heads are doing so poorly. Let me suggest that although the advice regarding ammonia is spot on, you may have some sort of parasite such as flat worms on that particular head. Infestations manifest exactly like this fairly often so dipping with Coral Rx or Prime, etc may help. I personally have seen flatworms a half inch long pop out of hammers that were failing when dipped. Good luck.
Okay, good to know! Thank you!
 

45ZoaGarden

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Whooa. Your advise has been all over the place lol. First off there should be absolute 0 ammonia. Your water is also very cloudy which is a concern as well... salinity is low. What is cal, alk, mag, and phosphate? What is your lighting? Flow? I don’t think the fish is the problem... that’s just what fish do... are you using ro/di water? No need to cut the coral up, it’s not “infected” that’s just an upset hammer.
 

Brian1f1

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Whooa. Your advise has been all over the place lol. First off there should be absolute 0 ammonia. Your water is also very cloudy which is a concern as well... salinity is low. What is cal, alk, mag, and phosphate? What is your lighting? Flow? I don’t think the fish is the problem... that’s just what fish do... are you using ro/di water? No need to cut the coral up, it’s not “infected” that’s just an upset hammer.
Really hasn’t been. It’s been pretty clear generally. Needs to get ammonia figured out. Fish probably didn’t do that. Cutting the bad head off can be good practice if it’s separated enough to do so. It’s probably not infected, but it is hanging/dying, and definitely not just upset. Anyway, you repeated the main concerns voiced here, which is reinforcing, so that’s good.
 
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45ZoaGarden

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The flesh is not receding. If the flesh was receding, I would say it’s more then being upset. Cutting it up will just bother the coral even more...
Really hasn’t been. It’s been pretty clear generally. Needs to get ammonia figured out. Fish probably didn’t do that. Cutting the bad head off can be good practice if it’s separated enough to do so. It’s probably not infected, but it is hanging/dying, and definitely not just upset. Anyway, you repeated the main concerns voiced here, which is reinforcing, so that’s good.
 

Neoalchemist

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API ammonia tests frequently give a false ammonia reading. Take some water to your lfs and confirm your water perams. If your ammonia really was high your fish will be the first indicator, (gasping at the surface, flashing, lethargy, or discoloration) if the the fish aren't showing stress I highly doubt ammonia.
 

Brian1f1

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The flesh is not receding. If the flesh was receding, I would say it’s more then being upset. Cutting it up will just bother the coral even more...
Are you looking at the right picture? Not receding? It’s rotting out of the skeleton in pieces....

086CC948-140B-4BA0-A79A-5A6278D5963D.jpeg
 
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Greenebean04

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API ammonia tests frequently give a false ammonia reading. Take some water to your lfs and confirm your water perams. If your ammonia really was high your fish will be the first indicator, (gasping at the surface, flashing, lethargy, or discoloration) if the the fish aren't showing stress I highly doubt ammonia.
Okay I plan on going to my lfs some time today, any recommendations for a better testing method ?
 

living_tribunal

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The tank looks cloudy.

Since it’s a new tank the parameters are most likely in line with your salt.

My first guess would be flow, phosphate levels (make sure you have some) or whatever is causing your tank to be cloudy.

I’d dump in some bacteria for that ammonia, should disappear pretty quick.
 

Neoalchemist

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Ammonia testing after a cycle is complete isn't nessicary or even useful at all. If you have measurable nitrate your tank is cycled. Unless in quarantine or other situation where the entire bacterial colony crash. And in most of those cases fish are dead or dying long before you test. Dont worry about ammonia unless you see distressed fish or unless in a quarantine situation or similar.
Or if adding a large biomass (lots of fish at the same time) or if something rather large dies and can't be found or retrieved.
 

Brian1f1

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But he has ammonia....
But he has ammonia....
I know it’s API, but she was clear it was reading 0 before and now it’s clearly not...It seems like a potential mini-cycle. Her water is also cloudy, and we don’t know a whole lot else about how her livestock is doing.

Regarding the coral, I think all are in agreement that the water is possibly more alarming than a potential brown jelly issue, but reducing risk of bj infection is good practice.
 

PghReef

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I second the false + with API. I only test ammonia during cycle, and use API. As long as it looks between the 0 and the .25 I consider it negative. Anything higher is easily seen on the chart but the cloudy yellow yellos/green is impossible to tell apart.
As for the cloudy water could be a bacterial bloom,not in common in a newer tank. The fish and other heads look fine
 
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