Help with Algae ID in new tank

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Hello, I am new to Marine systems but I have quite a bit of experience with Freshwater tanks. I am stepping into this hobby with a 40 gal breeder with a 20 gal sump (drilled bulkhead overflow and return.) My tank finished cycling about 2 weeks ago and I have had an outbreak of algae that started basically the last week of the cycle. I was hoping it would diminish as other microorganisms took hold in the new system but it doesnt seem to have slowed down. I have tried shortening my light cycle (full strength is on for 4hrs a day) and its currently lit by a CurrentUSA Marine Orbit 36" LED. I have also done a bit of manual removal but it comes back with a vengeance within a week. This past week I have put Chaeto in my refugium with an LED refugium light in the hopes that it will reduce some nutrients but it doesnt seem to have had an effect yet.
Admittedly I have not purchased a Phosphate test kit so I cannot tell you what my phosphate levels are at the the moment. Its next on the list when I can get to the store. I was hoping someone could help ID this algae (is this the dreaded Bryopsis or just a Hair Algae?) so I can get a clean up crew to help with the management until I get this under control. I currently have 2 clowns in the tank as well as 5 Astrea Snails and 1 Nassarus Snail.
Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks.

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ProfessorAronnax

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Looks like hair algae to me. Honestly, at such an early age, your tank is going to go through it. Best you can do is maybe cut back how much you feed and do water changes. Speaking of water, are you using RODI or tap water?
 

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Did you cure the rock by chance? Could be leaching phosphate and will be very hard to control the growth. I wouldn't add to much to the tank as far as inverts go for now as your tank is pretty new. I would get a phosphate test kit, small frequent water changes and manual removal for now.
 
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Looks like hair algae to me. Honestly, at such an early age, your tank is going to go through it. Best you can do is maybe cut back how much you feed and do water changes. Speaking of water, are you using RODI or tap water?
I am using RODI.
 

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I think you're right to address it, but I wouldn't stress. It's a good sign. Chaeto can take a few weeks or so to really hit its stride and start doing its thing.

You'll want to know your nitrate and phosphate #'s, but people go crazy going down that rabbit hole. Just try to keep them reasonable. No corals or anything yet, so you have a free hand to get medieval on the algae if you care to. Pull the offending rocks right out during a water change and work them over with a stiff-bristled brush in a bucket of water you will discard. You can spray them with hydrogen peroxide.

CUC doesn't do well with big tufts, but if you can knock it back into tender sprigs, they'll love it. I like hermits and turbos. Opinions vary.
 
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Did you cure the rock by chance? Could be leaching phosphate and will be very hard to control the growth. I wouldn't add to much to the tank as far as inverts go for now as your tank is pretty new. I would get a phosphate test kit, small frequent water changes and manual removal for now.
No I didn't cure the rock but I used a combination of established live rock and base rock from an old tank that I bleached clean and dried out, then dechlorinated. I bought a PO4 test kit and it showed basically undetectable levels of phosphate.
 
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No I didn't sure the rock but I used a combination of established live rock and some base rock from an old tank that I bleached clean, dried out, and dechlorinated. I bought a phosphate test kit and it showed basically undetectable levels.
 
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I think you're right to address it, but I wouldn't stress. It's a good sign. Chaeto can take a few weeks or so to really hit its stride and start doing its thing.

You'll want to know your nitrate and phosphate #'s, but people go crazy going down that rabbit hole. Just try to keep them reasonable. No corals or anything yet, so you have a free hand to get medieval on the algae if you care to. Pull the offending rocks right out during a water change and work them over with a stiff-bristled brush in a bucket of water you will discard. You can spray them with hydrogen peroxide.

CUC doesn't do well with big tufts, but if you can knock it back into tender sprigs, they'll love it. I like hermits and turbos. Opinions vary.
My Nitrates are at 0 (probably due to the Chaeto and hair algae consuming it) and the phosphates were undetectable using the API PO4 test kit. The outbreak does seem to have slowed down so I will stick with manual removal of the big tufts and let the CUC take care of the rest for now.
 

ProfessorAronnax

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No, I don't have a TDS meter. Is this something that I should think about getting?
It absolutely is. Having a way to read the total dissolved solids (tds) in your source water is, in my opinion, the most important aspect of your water chemistry. 0 TDS is what you're aiming for. Anything above 0 could consist of phosphates, copper, silicate, etc... TDS in your clean water supply is a leading cause of many types of unwanted algae.
 
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Tool13x

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It absolutely is. Having a way to read the total dissolved solids (tds) in your source water is, in my opinion, the most important aspect of your water chemistry. 0 TDS is what you're aiming for. Anything above 0 could consist of phosphates, copper, silicate, etc... TDS in your clean water supply is a leading cause of many types of unwanted algae.
I gotcha. I guess I was putting alot of faith in expecting RODI to always be at 0. I suppose this could depend on how often the membranes are changed?
 

ProfessorAronnax

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I gotcha. I guess I was putting alot of faith in expecting RODI to always be at 0. I suppose this could depend on how often the membranes are changed?
Not always how often they are changed. There are some variable factors that play into it as well; water pressure, too much tds and not enough filter stages to remove it, etc... Having a TDS meter will really let you know where you're sitting at. When you see it climb to 1, you know it's about time to change those out. I chag when the number hits 2 but I'm running all softies.
 

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