!!!HIGH SALINITY, AM I A ONE MAN GANG? OR ANYONE ELSE IN??

Discussion in 'Battlecorals' started by Battlecorals, May 31, 2018.

  1. JBNY

    JBNY Active Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Spotlight Award

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    I ran my tank at 1.028 / 40 for well over six months before I realized I had not tested my Salinity for a long time. Now I do it every 60 days and keep it around 1.025 / 35. But the whole time I had it elevated I never lost any SPS or fish.
     
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  2. The Camaro Show

    The Camaro Show Valuable Member Build Thread Contributor

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    I know people do fish only set ups at 1.023 and that will help with some with ich and issues but Idk about higher salinity
     
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  3. greg 45

    greg 45 Active Member

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    Adam I had some issue with the Milwaukee tester . I e mailed the company and they some of there distilled water and there own salinity product and it was still off. I went back to a regular refractometer with there test solution . Can you test your water this way and give a comparison. Thanks
     
  4. L Sean Hubbard

    L Sean Hubbard Member

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    I'm the surprised fish prefer it. I've read that higher salinity causes their bodies to work harder, which is why hyposalinity is recommended when dipping, in order to reduce stress.
     
  5. Battlecorals

    Battlecorals Aquaculturist R2R Supporter Gold Sponsor

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    the thing is I've had lots of customers test my water with refractos as well when they received orders. asking the same question about why mine may be so high. As well I've tested others water that I've received, and it usually come in closer to 1.025 on the milwaukee. Not saying mines 100% accurate but the discrepancy is there
     
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  6. Caravanshaka

    Caravanshaka Well-Known Member R2R Supporter Reef Tank 365 Build Thread Contributor

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    What's odd for me is that my water tests out 35 ppt on a refractomer and my milwaukee....but twice now I've had ATI ICP tests come back a hair over 33ppt.
     
  7. blkhwkz

    blkhwkz Well-Known Member Partner Member 2019

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    I tested mine last week and was at 1.029-1.030, SPS, clams and fish were as happy as could be. Tested on Milwaukee and a refractometer, was probably that high for 2 months since I tend to ignore my Apex salinity probe. I did lower it to 1.026 for a new batch of fish I was moving from QT. This is the 2nd time it has been at 1.028 or higher this year and everything is growing great.
     
  8. David S

    David S Active Member

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    I recently observed that my SG had crept up to 1.027 - 1.028 range. I like to keep it at 1.025.
    Can't say how long my salinity was elevated but if there was any change in my fish or corals it was too subtle to notice
     
  9. craigbingman

    craigbingman Member

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    If your measurement device reads in salinity as well as specific gravity, it is strongly preferred that you report the salinity. Salinity is the parameter we care about. Specific gravity would be an issue if you were concerned about buoyancy. Fish handle that on their own, and coral doesn't float. Salinity is what you care about.
     
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  10. craigbingman

    craigbingman Member

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    If your measurement device reads in salinity as well as specific gravity, it is strongly preferred that you report the salinity. Salinity is the parameter we care about. Specific gravity would be an issue if you were concerned about buoyancy. Fish handle that on their own, and coral doesn't float. Salinity is what you care about.
     
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  11. Proteus Meep

    Proteus Meep Member R2R Supporter Photo of the Month Award

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    Running my mixed nano reef at 1.028 since day one as i use nutri-seawater and that's what its comes to me at out of the bottle...everything happy and healthy
     
  12. tigertym57

    tigertym57 Member

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    Not to get off topic but every test I've done through Ati labs has my salinity consistently at 31.64 and every calibrated meter I own has it at 35. I don't even worry over it anymore.
     
  13. tnyr5

    tnyr5 Tony Reef Tank 365

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    I take the opposite view and find the wide range liberating. It reinforces what I tell newbies: The things that are supposed to "matter" don't matter as much as they're supposed to matter, so watch your tank, feed your fish, let things decide where they want to be, be patient, and relax.
     
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  14. Reef Pets

    Reef Pets Bioprospector

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    I feel that coral will adapt to their surroundings over time.
    Introducing new coral to an environment that has high or low levels can sometimes be challenging.
    This is why I feel hobbyist will say their coral is doing great but when they add new coral the new coral dies.
    I’ve heard this many times over the years.

    Years ago I had a bad test kit and was keeping my Alk around 5.5 for a long time and didn’t know it. The coral weren’t growing but the color was probably the best I’d ever had.
    But I started getting reports of coral that I shipped were perishing shortly after introduced into a new system. They were use to the 5.5 and placing them in 8-12 was killing them rapidly.
     
  15. dmunyon8

    dmunyon8 Member

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    I read a thread recently that suggested that the population of bacteria that causes STN and RTN can be reduced by increasing your salinity. I wonder if that is playing a factor...
     
  16. BradB

    BradB Active Member

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    Red Sea levels might work better than Pacific levels. But if you undershoot Pacific levels, you are in the territory of people being cheap or feel hyposalinity is beneficial and I know you can run a reef tank that way. If you aim for Red Sea levels and overshoot, you end up at Dead Sea levels and turn your favorite fish into baccala.
     
  17. Sangheili

    Sangheili Well-Known Member

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    Nearly every time I've had tank issues in the past 2years has been when salinity has crept up to and over 38ppt. IMO there is a fine line between 35-38ppt where things are great. Since I dose Triton my salinity is always slowly creeping and I have to remove water as a result. I've ran into the issue many times over the years.

    It seems similar to temperature IMO. Running an acro tank as close to 82ish degrees you can will give the best growth. But if you press it up to 85+ you'll see RTN real fast. I wish I would have saved it, but I read a scientific paper a couple years back that looked at growth rates of stony corals in the wild in different ocean climates, and the takeaway was roughly going from 74 up to 81 degree water == double the growth rate. It was a linear increase with temp up until 85ish. Obviously it's a balance as most fish prefer colder on the scale, and the closer you get to the 85+ danger zone the less buffer you have when catastrophe strikes like power loss or AC failure (for those in hot climates).

    Lastly I will add: Your salinity testing equipment is absolutely critical. Nothing out there beats a consistent quality refractometer. I have had conductivity probes and Milwakee digital refractos both lie to me and be wildly off when compared to a consistent refractometer. Now a days I test with known-good consistent refractometers and double check when I get Triton results (there is a way to calculate salinity from ICP results). Calibrate with refracto solution!
     
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  18. rockskimmerflow

    rockskimmerflow Well-Known Member

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    @Battlecorals I'm glad you mentioned you use the milwaukee digital refractometer as I have had a number of customers with them and every one has read 1 to 2pts higher than my calibrated refractometers I bring to consults. Maybe you have an anomalous one that is inline with stanard manual refractometers, but Id wager you are running closer to the 35ppt or 1.026 that most of us shoot for. I think its just your rock stable husbandry that caused those coral to kick into overdrive. Ive never had sps respond much differently in tanks with higher than 35ppt salinity personally. Have seen issues with 1.022 or lower, however. Interesting topic of discussion for sure!
     
  19. Velcro

    Velcro Valuable Member

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    Lab grade conductivity meters with nist traceable calibration fluid are way better than refractometers.
     
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  20. Bmezz

    Bmezz Active Member

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    All very interesting- I have a LFS that has the absolute most beautiful corals- rare and colorful all types and nice sizes. "The Reef Lounge" in Anaheim California.
    he keeps many of his tanks at 1.023. Im trying that now and jury is still out. alkaline at 7.9, mag at 1350 calcium at 450. I did just notice i needed to add strontium. Any comments regarding Strontium? does everyone typically measure and add this?
     
  21. dave57

    dave57 Active Member

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    I had the redsea refractometer and purchased a calibration solution of 35 ppt for it in order to calibrate it. I began getting frustrated with constantly calibrating the dang thing so I bought a milawakee digital read meter. On the calibrated redsea refractometer I would get 35 ppt 1.026 specific gravity, then I tested on a calibrated milawakee to see the difference and my specific gravity read 1.030! I was left confused!? I sold the redsea and stuck with the Milwaukee as many people suggested this meter. I slowly dropped my specific gravity to 1.026 and I notice things perk up.. now after dosing two part for sometime my salinity creeped up to 1.028-1.030 and things are happy too?! Honestly I don’t have any issues with 1.026, 1.028, or 1.030.. changes over time is probably the key to preventing many problems that could have sprung. Stability and slow changes to the ecosystem is key for adaptation and health.
     
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