How did I get Dinos again?

Deltec

JosephM

Valuable Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Nov 22, 2020
Messages
1,559
Reaction score
1,039
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Lincolnton
This isn’t so much a post about how to fight them I just want to know how I got them again and what I can do to prevent it coming back a third time once I beat them. Little bit of history... I had ostreopsis Dinos and beat them fairly easily a few weeks back. A couple weeks I noticed the same stuff this time more localized to the sand and hard corals and didn’t disappear as much at night. I believe it’s a different species but looked very similar to my first ID of ostreopsis. My old microscope went bad and my new one won’t focus as well so I can only guess at like 150x magnification. My nitrates are 10-25ppm and phosphates 0.05-0.1ppm always since I last beat Dinos. I’m currently dosing live phyto, pods, and MB7. Plugged up my super overpowered UV yesterday. Started manual removal today and will start changing the filter socks daily again. So main questions... what caused them to come back with such elevated nutrients and anything else I can do to beat them?
 
Zoanthids
OP
JosephM

JosephM

Valuable Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Nov 22, 2020
Messages
1,559
Reaction score
1,039
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Lincolnton
Run you water temp at 79 degrees blackout for two the three days. You could run a cheato reactor some thing is off balance. Some of these ideals may help.
I’ll raise the temp. Not going to resort to blackout unless it starts bothering corals really bad. I’m not a huge believer that it does much against Dinos. I have a large fuge in my sump.
I don’t think Dino’s ever leave, some wil be present in very low levels, did you change something recently ? More light , new rock ect or clean glass really well?
I added a couple small pieces of dry rock, added a large chunk of chaeto, started dosing chaeto gro, took the UV offline, cleaned glass pretty well, started dosing tons of pods quite frequently, and added new corals. I don’t know if any of those of which of those could’ve contributed.
 
Avast

vetteguy53081

Well known Member and monster tank lover
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
51,355
Reaction score
114,915
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Wisconsin - Florida in several months
Dinoflagellates are protists organisms -those that do not fit within the three natural kingdoms: animalia, plantae or fungus- with ability to move with rotating movements. All dinoflagellates have the common feature of having two flagella located at right angles allowing them to perform such rotational movement which makes them easily recognizable (although some species such as the genus symbiodinium they are virtually immobile).
There are about 2.400 species which have a highly variable size ranging from 20 and 300 µm in the most common ones and up to 2 mm in the case of species such as noctiluca. In the marine aquarium species are usual smaller as symbiodinium and Amphidinium, While some like ostreopsis are large and can be seen without a microscope (with good lighting and visual acuity).
The problem arises when conditions in the aquarium break the biological balance and some dinoflagellate species spread uncontrollably, smothering the rest of the aquarium inhabitants. If the dinoflagellate species in question has the ability to produce toxins (usual in ostreopsis, gambierdiscus and prorocentrum to name a few)
The problem often arises when we try to bring cleanliness it to the limit, in order to improve its appearance and color of corals.
They tend to occur suddenly when the aquarium water reaches an extraordinary cleanliness, in which most microorganisms perishes for lack of food. With no other organisms that can stop them, this type of dinoflagellate can multiply so fast that when we realize it's late and we will find an aquarium full of brown and ochre slime suffocating fish and invertebrates. These dinoflagellates possess chloroplasts enabling them to synthesize their own food even under a minimal amount of light. Some species can form cysts called pellicles which allow them to remain in the aquarium for months although we have completely sterilized or kept in complete darkness. Once the light or the right conditions come back, they will reappear and thus problems.
Most of these dinoflagellates have a very curious behavior, typical of pathogens and parasites. With the presence of light they secrete mucus which adhere to any surface, including algae, coral and fish. They spend hours synthesising food and extending vertically in search of the light source (if we turn off the pumps in the aquarium we can see brown filaments grow towards the surface). When the light source disappears and can no longer synthesize food, it begins to diminish to none.

https://ww
 
OP
JosephM

JosephM

Valuable Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Nov 22, 2020
Messages
1,559
Reaction score
1,039
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Lincolnton
New dry rock would be the cause I fear , you introduced a bunch of new unused space for bacteria , the Dino’s would be the first to claim (they were waiting for this moment lol) just let rock go through process and put UV on
Also cleaning the glass is the same thing, intro using a new space for bacteria to colonize
See that’s what I would think too but they haven’t touched the dry rock or the front and side walls (the ones I clean). They’re mainly on corals, back glass, sand, and spotty on the live rock.

Dinoflagellates are protists organisms -those that do not fit within the three natural kingdoms: animalia, plantae or fungus- with ability to move with rotating movements. All dinoflagellates have the common feature of having two flagella located at right angles allowing them to perform such rotational movement which makes them easily recognizable (although some species such as the genus symbiodinium they are virtually immobile).
There are about 2.400 species which have a highly variable size ranging from 20 and 300 µm in the most common ones and up to 2 mm in the case of species such as noctiluca. In the marine aquarium species are usual smaller as symbiodinium and Amphidinium, While some like ostreopsis are large and can be seen without a microscope (with good lighting and visual acuity).
The problem arises when conditions in the aquarium break the biological balance and some dinoflagellate species spread uncontrollably, smothering the rest of the aquarium inhabitants. If the dinoflagellate species in question has the ability to produce toxins (usual in ostreopsis, gambierdiscus and prorocentrum to name a few)
The problem often arises when we try to bring cleanliness it to the limit, in order to improve its appearance and color of corals.
They tend to occur suddenly when the aquarium water reaches an extraordinary cleanliness, in which most microorganisms perishes for lack of food. With no other organisms that can stop them, this type of dinoflagellate can multiply so fast that when we realize it's late and we will find an aquarium full of brown and ochre slime suffocating fish and invertebrates. These dinoflagellates possess chloroplasts enabling them to synthesize their own food even under a minimal amount of light. Some species can form cysts called pellicles which allow them to remain in the aquarium for months although we have completely sterilized or kept in complete darkness. Once the light or the right conditions come back, they will reappear and thus problems.
Most of these dinoflagellates have a very curious behavior, typical of pathogens and parasites. With the presence of light they secrete mucus which adhere to any surface, including algae, coral and fish. They spend hours synthesising food and extending vertically in search of the light source (if we turn off the pumps in the aquarium we can see brown filaments grow towards the surface). When the light source disappears and can no longer synthesize food, it begins to diminish to none.

https://ww
Thank you for all the info. So from my understanding it’s basically just an imbalance that I triggered in my system that caused the right conditions for them?
 

dvgyfresh

Valuable Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Jul 9, 2020
Messages
2,097
Reaction score
4,175
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Los Angeles
See that’s what I would think too but they haven’t touched the dry rock or the front and side walls (the ones I clean). They’re mainly on corals, back glass, sand, and spotty on the live rock.


Thank you for all the info. So from my understanding it’s basically just an imbalance that I triggered in my system that caused the right conditions for them?
New dry rock still has to go throug cycle , something in the rock caused an imbalance in the system causing Dino bloom and also turning off UV could be diatoms also feeding off silicates from rock
 

vetteguy53081

Well known Member and monster tank lover
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
51,355
Reaction score
114,915
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Wisconsin - Florida in several months
See that’s what I would think too but they haven’t touched the dry rock or the front and side walls (the ones I clean). They’re mainly on corals, back glass, sand, and spotty on the live rock.


Thank you for all the info. So from my understanding it’s basically just an imbalance that I triggered in my system that caused the right conditions for them?
Yes
 
Click to watch best scape method in 5 easy steps!
OP
JosephM

JosephM

Valuable Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Nov 22, 2020
Messages
1,559
Reaction score
1,039
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Lincolnton
In all reality is there anyway to avoid them? So basically I got them, no direct cause just an imbalance somewhere. Obviously keeping your tank in balance can prevent them but there’ll always be a chance of them coming back when adding new things?
 

dvgyfresh

Valuable Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Jul 9, 2020
Messages
2,097
Reaction score
4,175
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Los Angeles
In all reality is there anyway to avoid them? So basically I got them, no direct cause just an imbalance somewhere. Obviously keeping your tank in balance can prevent them but there’ll always be a chance of them coming back when adding new things?
Yes they will always be in waiting I think
 
Deltec

What would you buy RIGHT NOW if you found an AMAZING deal on it?

  • Equipment

    Votes: 361 52.8%
  • Dry Goods

    Votes: 18 2.6%
  • Fish

    Votes: 66 9.6%
  • Coral

    Votes: 177 25.9%
  • Other Livestock

    Votes: 6 0.9%
  • Nothing

    Votes: 47 6.9%
  • Other (please explain)

    Votes: 9 1.3%
http://www.marcorocks.com/
Top