Inovative Marine EXT 200 Peninsula Build...

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Sean Clark

Sean Clark

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The return pump is a Skimz Leopard 160. This is an AC pump. I did not run any silicone tubing between the pump and the return line because the pump has silicone feet and I have set it on to a custom made "sled" to eliminate vibration transfer. If you look closely at the return line you will see that there are not any clamps on the return line plumbing from the return pump, all the way to the edge of the stand. The return is floating and is only supported in three places. Two of those are where it exits the stand, the third is the pump itself. This minimises contact points, vibration, and noise. Because the return pump is a support, I can not have any soft tubing above it.

Basically, I have moved the cushion to the bottom of the pump.
Here are some photos so you you can better understand what I mean by sled.
20210828_215355.jpg


20210828_215345.jpg

20210828_215334.jpg


Sorry the pump is dusty, I only pulled it out to demonstrate this.

This is my "backup" pump that I am using for a photo opp here. This pump is for when the primary pump fails.

The sled is machined out of UHMW which is an industrial plastic. Super tough, super slick, reef safe, and nothing will stick to it; not even superglue.

Of course I have a sled for each side to even things out; just not in this photo...
 
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Sean Clark

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Make sense. I mean if you got um you got um was thinking you may have bought them new just to light your stand $$. Are you doing a fuge? If so over head lighting or through the side wall of the sump lighting like the Chaetomax? I've always wanted a sump with a Chaetomax light on either side of my sump to reduce light spill and have unobstructed access to the top of my fuge section.
Sorry, I didn't address your lighting question. My initial thoughts were to light from above. I have not considered lighting the fuge from the sides, kind of like an algae reactor if I understand you correctly. With my setup, I could easily try out both and see what works better long term. I do like the idea of having free access to the top and the ability to control light spillage. This is a great idea. Thanks.
 

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So I run a Varios 6 in my tank and its DC and sits on silicone feet none the less I run a 10 inch length of silicone from my return to my manifold. Now the loudest thing on my tank is my skimmer air draw. Does it make a whole lotta difference honestly I have no idea. Maybe a couple decibel difference it also makes it a bit more forgiving to move my return pump around but my under cabinet space is >tiny<.

Re fuge vs reactor. I have an MBR 157. While it serves it's purpose (my water is "too clean" at this point, whoops) if I had the space I would have opted for a traditional fuge. One it pulls every last bubble into it, not sure if it's actually a problem but I find myself burping every other day. I'm also pretty positive it doesn't contribute to the pod growth a traditional fuge does. That being said I recommend macro reactors to anyone who has limited fuge space such as myself. I have about double macro capacity than I would if I were running Chaeto loose in my sump. Plus it reduces clogging since my macro and skimmer occupy the same space.

The sled is an interesting concept. I don't use UHMW in my tank applications but I use it in a number of places in my home gym to protect my barbells and powder coat on my gear.

I'm fascinated with the idea of the return pump being a support. I'm curious if it puts any increase of pressure on your bulkheads when you pull the pump for service. I found out the hard way when I failed to clip my manifold into place and I pulled the pump. It pulled on my bulkhead and created a slow drip that almost flooded my sump because I took a break mid pump service. Mind you, again, tiny sump vs tank volume. I have my plumbing supports spaced from the stand with rubber stand offs for vibration reduction.

I'm curious what are your stocking plans? I've not seen the light you're using in real life. How's the spread/distribution?
 
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Sean Clark

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So I run a Varios 6 in my tank and its DC and sits on silicone feet none the less I run a 10 inch length of silicone from my return to my manifold. Now the loudest thing on my tank is my skimmer air draw. Does it make a whole lotta difference honestly I have no idea. Maybe a couple decibel difference it also makes it a bit more forgiving to move my return pump around but my under cabinet space is >tiny<.

Re fuge vs reactor. I have an MBR 157. While it serves it's purpose (my water is "too clean" at this point, whoops) if I had the space I would have opted for a traditional fuge. One it pulls every last bubble into it, not sure if it's actually a problem but I find myself burping every other day. I'm also pretty positive it doesn't contribute to the pod growth a traditional fuge does. That being said I recommend macro reactors to anyone who has limited fuge space such as myself. I have about double macro capacity than I would if I were running Chaeto loose in my sump. Plus it reduces clogging since my macro and skimmer occupy the same space.

The sled is an interesting concept. I don't use UHMW in my tank applications but I use it in a number of places in my home gym to protect my barbells and powder coat on my gear.

I'm fascinated with the idea of the return pump being a support. I'm curious if it puts any increase of pressure on your bulkheads when you pull the pump for service. I found out the hard way when I failed to clip my manifold into place and I pulled the pump. It pulled on my bulkhead and created a slow drip that almost flooded my sump because I took a break mid pump service. Mind you, again, tiny sump vs tank volume. I have my plumbing supports spaced from the stand with rubber stand offs for vibration reduction.

I'm curious what are your stocking plans? I've not seen the light you're using in real life. How's the spread/distribution?
This is the first time that I have run return plumbing like this. I usually do run soft tubing to connect the return pump. I do think that it helps with service for sure. Because I have unions at the pump and at the three way valve, I can just remove the "down pipe" and access or remove the pump just as easily as removing a few hose clamps.
My previous setup had a remote sump in the basement. This spoiled me as far as noise goes. Noise was a huge factor for me on this build since I could not do a remote sump this time around.

Too clean of water? This is the world we now live in. Imagine telling someone ten years ago that you were dosing No3 and Po4 into your tank. I like the idea of algae reactors, especially if you do not have room or are not able to run a traditional refugium. I do not understand why they need to be so expensive though.

As for your bubble problem, I may have a solution that you could use. My sulfur reactor has a de-gasing port on the top of it that you are supposed to open as needed to bleed off the nitrogen gas that collects at the top of it. I added a Y fitting to the de-gasing line and tied it back into the effluent line. This allows the gas to escape from the top and flow into the effluent. I no longer need to bleed the reactor.
Perhaps you could add de-gasing port to the top of your MBR 157.
Inked20210829_073808_LI.jpg


The piping is very ridged even when the "down pipe" is removed from the return pump. It only makes sense that it would add some pressure to the bulkheads if not supported like you mentioned.
To get around this, I sandwiched my clamps in-between two fittings, the reducer and the elbow that turns up. The clamp is secured to the stand and can not move. This locks the pipe in-place and does not allow for any deflection of the return line going up to the bulkheads. I also mounted the clamps so that they are sitting on top of the the stand rather than hanging from it (knowing that the load would be different than the drains).

Here is an example
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And installed. Left to right is return, drain, drain, drain, return.
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Top down on one of the return clamps
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I was going to install additional clamps, but found that it was not necessary.

For the light spread, all I will say right now is that it is very good. I do plan on posting a PAR map and all things lighting later on. I have used these lights in the past and have had good results. I was going to get the "Latest, greatist" thing; however, I do not think that the new lights are 40% better than the slightly older lights that use to be the latest and greatist. So I saved some money here and went with earlier model.

Stocking plans: Not a lot of fish, lots and lots of SPS and LPS, NO PALLYS. They take over everything. I am going for color and growth diversity and want to stay away from most things green.

I only have a few test coral in the tank at the moment. Mostly hardy frags from my other system. You can't see them but there are six fish in there too. I'll post some glamour shots of everyone later.
20210829_070750.jpg
 
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Sean Clark

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Not thread jacking lol.

Eventually all of that air will collect into a single point and would bleed off. I always have some air at the top of my reactor.

After I posted my suggestion, I realized that it would be quite difficult to implement on an algae reactor setup with much higher flow.

In the past, I needed to bleed off about an inch if gas a week, now I have zero maintenance.

I don't know if I would drill a hole in my nice reactor to see if this would work though.

Looking good.
 
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Sean Clark

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Meet the fishes.
I took all of these photos yesterday. The fish were not cooperating... Blurry photos, sorry.

Neon - Atlantic Blue Tang - Acanthurus coeruleus
Dory and Neon2.jpg

Nemo -True Percula Clownfish - Amphiprion percula
Nemo 2.jpg

Nemo.jpg

Dory - Yellow Belly Regal Blue Tang - Paracanthurus hepatus var.
Dory and Neon1.jpg

three amigos.jpg

Jeff - Blue Reef Chromis - Chromis cyaneus
20210829_144004.jpg

Jeff.jpg
Jeff1.jpg


Jorge - Melanurus Wrasse - Halichoeres melanurus
20210829_113532_01.jpg

Jorge.jpg

Elana - Purple Dottyback - Pseudochromis porphyreus
Elana1.jpg

elena2.jpg
 
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I would like a blue spotted jawfish (Opistognathus rosenblatti) but have never kept one. After that I think that I would be done with fish. Any thoughts?
Blue spot jewfish can be pretty difficult. The success rate is quite low on them beyond one year. If I’m following correctly, you only have about 5 fish! You can definitely add a few more and it will help stop your nutrients from bottoming out. Your tank is the perfect size to add a small school of something
 
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Blue spot jewfish can be pretty difficult. The success rate is quite low on them beyond one year. If I’m following correctly, you only have about 5 fish! You can definitely add a few more and it will help stop your nutrients from bottoming out. Your tank is the perfect size to add a small school of something
Thanks for the insight on the jawfish. Do you know why the success rate is so low? I want to keep one, but I do not want to condemn one.
 

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Thanks for the insight on the jawfish. Do you know why the success rate is so low? I want to keep one, but I do not want to condemn one.
If I'm not mistaken, the biggest issue is that they are a more temperate fish. People claim that they occasionally keep them on the low end of reef temps, but for some reason we never hear back from those folks long term.
 
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Sean Clark

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If I'm not mistaken, the biggest issue is that they are a more temperate fish. People claim that they occasionally keep them on the low end of reef temps, but for some reason we never hear back from those folks long term.
"for some reason"... Well stated... I don't want to keep something outside of its comfort zone. Thanks for the info. I am looking into this aspect now.
 

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"for some reason"... Well stated... I don't want to keep something outside of its comfort zone. Thanks for the info. I am looking into this aspect now.
To be fair, there was a discussion at some point about collection site. Apparently there are some places that are warmer and supposedly if you get one of those they MAY do better.
 
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Thanks for the insight on the jawfish. Do you know why the success rate is so low? I want to keep one, but I do not want to condemn one.
Honestly I’m not really sure. Their tails tend to get chewed away regardless if something is attacking them and they slowly fade away. You may have luck in a larger tank. The LFS I worked at had one in a 265 for years and it was happy as could be. The key may be providing them a larger environment because they seem to be easily stressed.

There’s no harm in trying. The way I see it is if it’s at an LFS or listed on LA, if it’s not going to your tank it will probably go to someone elses
 
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Blue spot jewfish can be pretty difficult. The success rate is quite low on them beyond one year. If I’m following correctly, you only have about 5 fish! You can definitely add a few more and it will help stop your nutrients from bottoming out. Your tank is the perfect size to add a small school of something
I do have an issue keeping nutrients up, but I do not want to over shoot with stocking. What would you put in this tank?
 
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Sean Clark

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What about a pearly white jawfish or a pair of them instead? I plan to get a pair for my 200. I am planning 15-20 fish....so you definitely have room for more fish.
Those are good looking fish for sure. Are there care requirements any different than a blue spot?
 

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I do have an issue keeping nutrients up, but I do not want to over shoot with stocking. What would you put in this tank?
I’m in the same boat, I’d never want to have a tank look too crowded. If it were me, I would probably add 1 or 2 more medium sized fish such as a yellow tang, butterfly, or dwarf angel. The blue hippo would be your large centerpiece fish. You could even buy some more blue reef chromis to get that schooling effect without adding too much bio load. Just remember to do odd numbers. Then you can add some small gobies and/or a few wrasses
 
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Speaking of your latest coral purchase...

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