Is it true that a Snowflake Moray Eel as first Saltwater experience isn't a good idea?

Invadetor

Community Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Oct 16, 2021
Messages
37
Reaction score
48
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Italy
I've been keeping a Freshwater tank for around 2 months, and another one for 2 weeks, and with them I kind of learnt a lot of things, like cycling (also Saltwater cycling, thank to Coralfish12g), ammonia/nitrite/nitrate (and how to fix in case of spike), Ph, Gh, KH, how to keep all of them in a certain range and etc... so I finally wanted to start a Saltwater tank, saw that I feel more confident about my skills and knowledge!
I went to the LFS and asked about the Moray Eel (without precising the specie), and they said it is better not to start with Moray Eel and that the tank I was planning to buy (around 92 gallons) would be to small for an adult... so I started feeling a little insecure and wanted to ask if that is indeed true... and if you know any video of an adult Snowflake Moray Eel in a 90gallons, so I can understand if it is indeed a bad idea.
At first I was planning to go with a Mantis Shrimp, but than I changed idea saw that I've seen that the Snowflake Moray Eel is easier to keep, and in general because they are my favorite fish!
Thank in advance for the help!
 
Orphek OR3 reef aquarium LED lighting

blaxsun

10K Club member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Dec 15, 2020
Messages
12,451
Reaction score
12,644
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
The Abyss
I concur with your LFS. If this is your first saltwater tank, diving in with a rather expensive and difficult inhabitant is not going to end well. You need to design the tank specifically with the moray in mind, and that means a PVC tunnel network, caves, excellent filtration, a lid to prevent escape, etc.

My advice is get a starter tank like a Fluval 13.5 gallon and see how you fare with your first endeavour (the whole setup will probably cost you less than the eel - and you can sell it later if you decide to move up to a larger tank).
 
OP
Invadetor

Invadetor

Community Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Oct 16, 2021
Messages
37
Reaction score
48
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Italy
I concur with your LFS. If this is your first saltwater tank, diving in with a rather expensive and difficult inhabitant is not going to end well. You need to design the tank specifically with the moray in mind, and that means a PVC tunnel network, caves, excellent filtration, a lid to prevent escape, etc.

My advice is get a starter tank like a Fluval 13.5 gallon and see how you fare with your first endeavour (the whole setup will probably cost you less than the eel - and you can sell it later if you decide to move up to a larger tank).
Oh, alright, but is there any fish that can live in a 13g? I know that any kind of fish need at least a 20g to thrive.
In case that's not true, if a clownfish can live in there, than I guess I'll opt for one/two of them... if any fish can't live in there, is there anything good for a beginner that is not a Shrimp? Like a crab or something else?
Said that when do I know if I'm ready for a Moray? Would keeping corals successful be a good sign?
Anyway thank for the help!
 

blaxsun

10K Club member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Dec 15, 2020
Messages
12,451
Reaction score
12,644
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
The Abyss
A pair of clownfish would be fine in the 13.5 gallon. You could probably even add a third or fourth small fish with the addition of the optional protein skimmer.

You'll still need a cleaning crew consisting of an assortment of hermit crabs, snails and other inverts (your LFS will have some recommendations).

Anyone can get into saltwater, but to do it well takes time (and you will make mistakes). I've been doing this for around two years, I'm up to my fourth tank (a 200-gallon system) - and I'm still learning every day. And I definitely don't have all the answers.

I currently have 32 fish, well over 100 assorted inverts and probably 50+ corals in a mixed reef (soft, LPS and SPS). Getting everything to not only survive but thrive didn't happen overnight, and striking the right balance to ensure everything gets along has been challenging (and I don't always succeed).

I myself still wouldn't feel comfortable tackling a moray, because in many ways the requirements (environment, care and feeding) are quite a bit different than my current mixed reef. That isn't to say that it can't be done, but as you're talking about a sizeable investment (several thousand dollars minimum) - I'd suggest a few hundred dollar investment in a smaller tank to give you a better idea of what you'll be in for. Good luck!
 

Tamberav

5000 Club Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Jul 4, 2014
Messages
6,677
Reaction score
9,863
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Wauwatosa, WI
I've been keeping a Freshwater tank for around 2 months, and another one for 2 weeks, and with them I kind of learnt a lot of things, like cycling (also Saltwater cycling, thank to Coralfish12g), ammonia/nitrite/nitrate (and how to fix in case of spike), Ph, Gh, KH, how to keep all of them in a certain range and etc... so I finally wanted to start a Saltwater tank, saw that I feel more confident about my skills and knowledge!
I went to the LFS and asked about the Moray Eel (without precising the specie), and they said it is better not to start with Moray Eel and that the tank I was planning to buy (around 92 gallons) would be to small for an adult... so I started feeling a little insecure and wanted to ask if that is indeed true... and if you know any video of an adult Snowflake Moray Eel in a 90gallons, so I can understand if it is indeed a bad idea.
At first I was planning to go with a Mantis Shrimp, but than I changed idea saw that I've seen that the Snowflake Moray Eel is easier to keep, and in general because they are my favorite fish!
Thank in advance for the help!

I wouldn’t say keeping corals relates much to keeping fish as they have different needs.

The biggest hurdle for beginners and fish in this hobby is disease. The wholesalers in the US are plagued with problems. The fish go to the LFS which often use low dose meds to hide the fish disease until they can sell themThen you buy it and suddenly days or weeks later it’s sick and making your other fish sick.

You will want to research marine fish disease and check out the disease forums here. Something like velvet can take an entire tank of fish out.

It’s one of the big causes as to why so many people quit the hobby not long after starting.

The larger the tank, the more wet things you can add and the more chances of something bad coming in.

You might as well familiar yourself so you can recognize disease and also know how to treat it. Some people quarantine all new fish because to remove parasites from a display means catching all fish and letting the display tank run empty for 45-76 days. It’s not fun.

Not trying to scare you. Just want you to be able to arm yourself with knowledge.

Also price everything out as larger tanks get expensive fast. There can be some real sticker shock.
 
Reef Chasers Aquaculture

WVNed

The fish are staring at me with hungry eyes.
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Apr 11, 2018
Messages
9,543
Reaction score
41,506
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Hurricane, WV
I have 2 in a 75 gallon tank. Snowflake eels do not get large.
I do not think a snowflake is any harder to keep than any other fish you could start with. It will need an appropriate diet and good filtration. You tank will have to have a tight fitting lid or you will find it on the floor. It will restrict you from keeping small fish in the tank because it will eat them. There are many fish that could be kept in a 90 gallon with it though. Your clean up animals will be slightly restricted for the same reason but conchs and urchins will work.
Do sufficient reading and understand the special needs of keeping an eel. It is not something that will ever eat fish flakes or pellets. There are also certain foods that will harm it because they contain an enzyme called thiaminase that destroys an essential vitamin the eel needs to live. There is much info about that on the web.
Understand they can be somewhat shy and reclusive and you may end up with an eel you rarely see much of.
 
OP
Invadetor

Invadetor

Community Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Oct 16, 2021
Messages
37
Reaction score
48
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Italy
A pair of clownfish would be fine in the 13.5 gallon. You could probably even add a third or fourth small fish with the addition of the optional protein skimmer.

You'll still need a cleaning crew consisting of an assortment of hermit crabs, snails and other inverts (your LFS will have some recommendations).

Anyone can get into saltwater, but to do it well takes time (and you will make mistakes). I've been doing this for around two years, I'm up to my fourth tank (a 200-gallon system) - and I'm still learning every day. And I definitely don't have all the answers.

I currently have 32 fish, well over 100 assorted inverts and probably 50+ corals in a mixed reef (soft, LPS and SPS). Getting everything to not only survive but thrive didn't happen overnight, and striking the right balance to ensure everything gets along has been challenging (and I don't always succeed).

I myself still wouldn't feel comfortable tackling a moray, because in many ways the requirements (environment, care and feeding) are quite a bit different than my current mixed reef. That isn't to say that it can't be done, but as you're talking about a sizeable investment (several thousand dollars minimum) - I'd suggest a few hundred dollar investment in a smaller tank to give you a better idea of what you'll be in for. Good luck!
Oh yeah, I understand, sometime I have that same problem myself to make my Axolotls' tank better and to make them thrive as much as possible!
And yup, I have seen that the price in total (Tank, Stand, Equipment and Moray) will be around 4k, and that's absurd lol, ahahahahah! I'm really curious to know why they cost so much!
Anyway thank for the help, I'll probably go with a 13g tank with a pair of small clownfish + some hermit crabs to clean everything up + some corals (after I get good)!
 
OP
Invadetor

Invadetor

Community Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Oct 16, 2021
Messages
37
Reaction score
48
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Italy
I wouldn’t say keeping corals relates much to keeping fish as they have different needs.

The biggest hurdle for beginners and fish in this hobby is disease. The wholesalers in the US are plagued with problems. The fish go to the LFS which often use low dose meds to hide the fish disease until they can sell them Then you buy it and suddenly days or weeks later it’s sick and making your other fish sick.

You will want to research marine fish disease and check out the disease forums here. Something like velvet can take an entire tank of fish out.

It’s one of the big causes as to why so many people quit the hobby not long after starting.

The larger the tank, the more wet things you can add and the more chances of something bad coming in.

You might as well familiar yourself so you can recognize disease and also know how to treat it. Some people quarantine all new fish because to remove parasites from a display means catching all fish and letting the display tank run empty for 45-76 days. It’s not fun.

Not trying to scare you. Just want you to be able to arm yourself with knowledge.

Also price everything out as larger tanks get expensive fast. There can be some real sticker shock.
Oh, is there no way to see if the animal has any illness in the LFS? Said that there is no Moray in my LFS, so I had to buy it online somewhere anyway ahahahah!
Don't worry, even if I get easily scared when talking about illnesses and pets, it is good to know how to actually help the animals if they have any problems! Plus in general is always good to get some new information! So thank for the help!
 
OP
Invadetor

Invadetor

Community Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Oct 16, 2021
Messages
37
Reaction score
48
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Italy
I have 2 in a 75 gallon tank. Snowflake eels do not get large.
I do not think a snowflake is any harder to keep than any other fish you could start with. It will need an appropriate diet and good filtration. You tank will have to have a tight fitting lid or you will find it on the floor. It will restrict you from keeping small fish in the tank because it will eat them. There are many fish that could be kept in a 90 gallon with it though. Your clean up animals will be slightly restricted for the same reason but conchs and urchins will work.
Do sufficient reading and understand the special needs of keeping an eel. It is not something that will ever eat fish flakes or pellets. There are also certain foods that will harm it because they contain an enzyme called thiaminase that destroys an essential vitamin the eel needs to live. There is much info about that on the web.
Understand they can be somewhat shy and reclusive and you may end up with an eel you rarely see much of.
Woah, they look really cute! Are those two adults? I thought they would get much bigger!
Can I ask what do you mean by good filtration? Do you mean that the tank has to be cycled? Or that I should buy a top quality Skimmer, and create a good refugium?
Oh yeah, and I already knew about the lid on top for Morays, I also know about water parameters and how to build the tank (I mean hiding spots and etc...), the only problem I have is the feeding! I know they like Shrimp and Krill the most, right? But I'm not sure how much to feed a juvenile and an adult! And saw that the Moray loves to eat Inverts, what would be the best clean up crew (that won't get eaten), for the Snowflake Moray?
Anyway thank for all the help!
 

WVNed

The fish are staring at me with hungry eyes.
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Apr 11, 2018
Messages
9,543
Reaction score
41,506
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Hurricane, WV
Avast

Tamberav

5000 Club Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Jul 4, 2014
Messages
6,677
Reaction score
9,863
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Wauwatosa, WI
Oh, is there no way to see if the animal has any illness in the LFS? Said that there is no Moray in my LFS, so I had to buy it online somewhere anyway ahahahah!
Don't worry, even if I get easily scared when talking about illnesses and pets, it is good to know how to actually help the animals if they have any problems! Plus in general is always good to get some new information! So thank for the help!

We do the best we can to pick out healthy fish that are eating at the store. However there is no reliably way to tell for sure. Fish are often kept in a way to hide disease.
 

YOYOYOReefer

Active Member
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
View Badges
Joined
Dec 9, 2021
Messages
395
Reaction score
269
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
bloomington il
I think a snowflake would be an ideal first saltwater tank experience.
they can take all kinds of bad water quality. heck ive had them dried to the carpet and still live.
just realize it will try to escape and have a top on your tank and you will love it,
 

How much of your saltwater reef tank is automated?

  • Nothing is automated

    Votes: 70 14.0%
  • 25% or so

    Votes: 155 31.0%
  • 50% or so

    Votes: 110 22.0%
  • 75% or so

    Votes: 111 22.2%
  • Close to 100%

    Votes: 51 10.2%
  • Totally Automated (we need proof)

    Votes: 3 0.6%
AAF
Top