Is there such thing as “tank regret”?

BRS
BRS

((FORDTECH))

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Jan 23, 2020
Messages
2,509
Reaction score
1,899
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Chicago
I love my AIO Biocube but I’m wishing I started off larger. I love the whole AIO type of tank setup. Of course it’s too late to get a new tank now with how much I invested in my 32g. Just curious if this is normal. Under no circumstance am I interested in managing two tanks; getting a second tank is out of the question. I’m starting to wish I started with at least a 75 gallon.
This is why 120gallon tank should be listed as starter tanks. In the long run people would spend less money and stay with the 1 tank. :)
 

reefinatl

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Dec 2, 2020
Messages
535
Reaction score
719
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
North GA
This is why 120gallon tank should be listed as starter tanks. In the long run people would spend less money and stay with the 1 tank. :)
I want a 120g sooooo bad. A 4' 120g sps and a 220 lps/softy are my goals. I want more room on my sand bed for trachyphyllia and room for a conch to roam. My pumps would work, my sump and plumbing could transfer, my 250w halides would be fine, just buy a tank and stand.... dang it stop doing this.
 

((FORDTECH))

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Jan 23, 2020
Messages
2,509
Reaction score
1,899
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Chicago
I want a 120g sooooo bad. A 4' 120g sps and a 220 lps/softy are my goals. I want more room on my sand bed for trachyphyllia and room for a conch to roam. My pumps would work, my sump and plumbing could transfer, my 250w halides would be fine, just buy a tank and stand.... dang it stop doing this.
Lol this is how it starts :) I started with a 29 bio cube moved up to 120 gallon reef ready in the living room and now have also the 300 gallon softy and fish tank in the basement
 
Click to watch best scape method in 5 easy steps!

reefinatl

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Dec 2, 2020
Messages
535
Reaction score
719
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
North GA
Lol this is how it starts :) I started with a 29 bio cube moved up to 120 gallon reef ready in the living room and now have also the 300 gallon softy and fish tank in the basement
Oh if I had a basement I would be broke and relegated to sleeping down there after the wife kicks me out of our room.... but man that 1000g display and fish room would be sweet.

I got sideeyed bad enough measuring out floor space for a 220g in our foyer within weeks of getting the 90g going again.
 

Kellie in CA

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Jun 5, 2017
Messages
688
Reaction score
1,465
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Claremont, CA
I've had quite a few tanks over the years, but the one I have now is my favorite. The 25 Lagoon is just so easy to maintain. Looks super clean, no powerhead or skimmer needed.
If I were to ever upgrade, the 50 Lagoon is about as big as I would go.
 
Top Shelf Aquatics

Cool tangs

Active Member
View Badges
Joined
Apr 16, 2021
Messages
153
Reaction score
241
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Aus
I regret selling my nano tank and all its live stock.

I regret spending money on rent and not buying more coral.

I regret not sealing my old house and just using the whole thing as an reef aquarium. Gosh imagine looking in the windows and just seeing fish swimming around. Heaven!
 
OP
mistergray

mistergray

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 16, 2021
Messages
654
Reaction score
333
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
NC
I've had quite a few tanks over the years, but the one I have now is my favorite. The 25 Lagoon is just so easy to maintain. Looks super clean, no powerhead or skimmer needed.
If I were to ever upgrade, the 50 Lagoon is about as big as I would go.
I’m gonna have to Google this!
 

blasterman

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Feb 14, 2019
Messages
1,730
Reaction score
1,923
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Gone from big tanks to small tanks over the years, and dont regret it.

Small tanks are cheaper and easier to maintain. Theres also less tendency to over stock.

What you lose is the ability to easily keep acropora. They are 100x harder to grow in a 20 vs 200 gallon tank. Everything else is easy.
 

NowGlazeIT

2500 Club Member
View Badges
Joined
Oct 28, 2017
Messages
3,366
Reaction score
3,877
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Palm Springs area
I started with a 58, then upgraded to a 225 and my new tank is 1100 gallons. I don't really have any regrets right now but in a couple years I'll want to upgrade. The only regret I had was buying an acrylic tank for the 225. Glass is way easier to keep clean.
Sweet mother Mary that is a lot of water to have laying around haha
 

littlebigreef

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Aug 25, 2016
Messages
1,043
Reaction score
1,203
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Batavia IL
Grass is always greener on the other side of the fence lol.

Post college I’ve moved 3 times (in about 15 years) and I’ve always set up a new system and run it a few weeks before transferring live stock. Had a pre-college 120 gal I initially set up and ran for 6-7 years. Then down graded and really packed a 75gal full of everything from the 120. Two years later we bought our first house and I went as large as I could- 220 gal with a 125 sump. That was fun and I was able to do a lot of things with it. In the last 6 months we bought our forever home and again I down sized to a 125 gal display (admittedly I have an 8’ plywood tank in my basement). People kept telling me ‘you should go larger’ but I’m actually quite happy with the 125 as a display. After doing this for 25 years, working in shops, doing maintenance professionally and then really honing my coral keeping skills over the last 15 years I’ve hit the point where with each move I’ve been clearly able to set my goals for what the next tank ‘should be’ and what I want to accomplish.

With this hobby I always actively encourage people to start smaller, do the clown fish and the nem AIO and cut your teeth there. If the carrying costs, time commitment and drive are still there then graduate up to something bigger. The truth is that every aquarium has a lifespan and that all of us, as aquarists, run the gamut when it comes to goals and motivation. But, it’s a marathon not a sprint to get to that 10,000 hours.
 
OP
mistergray

mistergray

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 16, 2021
Messages
654
Reaction score
333
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
NC
Gone from big tanks to small tanks over the years, and dont regret it.

Small tanks are cheaper and easier to maintain. Theres also less tendency to over stock.

What you lose is the ability to easily keep acropora. They are 100x harder to grow in a 20 vs 200 gallon tank. Everything else is easy.
I’ve debated a larger tank. The only thing I would hate is the water changes. For my 32g, I pretty much need to 5 gallon buckets. One for removing water and one for returning water. I couldn’t imagine the water changes if I went out and bought a 75g or larger. A 200g is waaaaay out of what I’m able to manage.
 
OP
mistergray

mistergray

Well-Known Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 16, 2021
Messages
654
Reaction score
333
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
NC
Grass is always greener on the other side of the fence lol.

Post college I’ve moved 3 times (in about 15 years) and I’ve always set up a new system and run it a few weeks before transferring live stock. Had a pre-college 120 gal I initially set up and ran for 6-7 years. Then down graded and really packed a 75gal full of everything from the 120. Two years later we bought our first house and I went as large as I could- 220 gal with a 125 sump. That was fun and I was able to do a lot of things with it. In the last 6 months we bought our forever home and again I down sized to a 125 gal display (admittedly I have an 8’ plywood tank in my basement). People kept telling me ‘you should go larger’ but I’m actually quite happy with the 125 as a display. After doing this for 25 years, working in shops, doing maintenance professionally and then really honing my coral keeping skills over the last 15 years I’ve hit the point where with each move I’ve been clearly able to set my goals for what the next tank ‘should be’ and what I want to accomplish.

With this hobby I always actively encourage people to start smaller, do the clown fish and the nem AIO and cut your teeth there. If the carrying costs, time commitment and drive are still there then graduate up to something bigger. The truth is that every aquarium has a lifespan and that all of us, as aquarists, run the gamut when it comes to goals and motivation. But, it’s a marathon not a sprint to get to that 10,000 hours.
Perfectly said!
 

MaxTremors

Valuable Member
View Badges
Joined
Mar 20, 2021
Messages
1,421
Reaction score
2,169
Review score
+0 /0 /-0
Location
Boise
In terms of tank planning, inhabitants, and aquascaping? Absolutely. I’ve been in the hobby long enough that I’ve had tanks from 5 gallons to 180 gallons, and I’ve got five different size tanks in my garage I could set up tomorrow if I wanted to, but right now I’m content with my 28 gallon nanocube. I bought it in January instead of setting up on of my larger tanks or my old circa 2007 biocube because I didn’t want to deal with the maintenance of a larger tank and the biocube would’ve needed new lights and return pumps, and I got the Nanocube for around what I would’ve spent on setting up the biocube, so it just seemed like the easier option. I’m sure I’ll set one of my bigger tanks up in a year or two (the reason I took them down was some health issues), but for now I’m content.
 
Orphek OR3 reef aquarium LED lighting
Industrial Test Systems, Inc.
Top