Lighting spectra, Photosynthesis, and You

  1. USMC4Life

    USMC4Life Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    691
    Likes Received:
    382
    Location:
    NJ
    I am very surprised. But that's good. Test it out put a frag in and see how it handles it.
     
  2. David Engh

    David Engh Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2016
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    30
    So what should my lux reading be on the meter
     
  3. saltyfilmfolks

    saltyfilmfolks Lights! Camera! Reef! R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Squad

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2014
    Messages:
    11,229
    Likes Received:
    9,003
    Location:
    California
    min 25,000 lux at 8 in. as an estimate. not going to be much par available though i would guess. very iffy.
     
  4. David Engh

    David Engh Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2016
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    30
    I will test it out when I get home from work an let you know what I find out. Thanks for the info and help. Will keep ya posted.
     
  5. mcarroll

    mcarroll Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Partner Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    Messages:
    8,144
    Likes Received:
    2,761
    Location:
    Virginia
    Probably anything around 15,000-20,000 lux would be OK, but anywhere between that and 50,000 lux would be pretty ideal. Up to 80,000 lux is accptable for most corals, but can be a cause of some oxidative stress too.

    More light is not necessarily better - corals are low-light specialists, really - but you do have to satisfy their minimums. Their minimum is called thier "light compensation point"....where they get enough light to cover costs of metabolism. Aka "Enough light". Most corals seem to hit their compensation point somewhere around 5,000 lux, plus or minus a few K. More light than that is gravy! :)

    Bonus article on corals adapting to low light and high light situations:
    "Primary Production and Photoadaptation in Light- and Shade-Adapted Colonies..."
    http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/222/1227/161.short

    Oh, also, the table of lux values here should give some more perspective:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lux#Illuminance

    Samples are taken at the surface so it doesn't matter. :)
     
    saltyfilmfolks likes this.
  6. Justin Nguyen

    Justin Nguyen Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2016
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    11
    Great article. Thank you so much.
     
    saltyfilmfolks likes this.
  7. Company101

    Company101 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2014
    Messages:
    277
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Wilmington, NC
    Jumping in on this thread.

    My current set up is 2-1 royal blues to neutral white.

    I have
    40 royal blues
    20 neutral whites
    4 lime
    8 UV.

    These are spread out over 4 units.
    Over a 180 gallon tank

    IMG_0076.JPG

    Here is my tank

    I run a storm controller with 6 dimmers

    All leds were purchased from rapid.

    I have debated adding Violet. Maybe another color

    I believe I am turned up to about 75%

    I have light defusion white from Home Depot over the tank to keep jumpers in the tank.

    The grid is 18" above the tank.

    Just bought a biotech parameter to measure light.

    My corals open up. And grow. But not fast. Or nearly no growth.

    Any advice will be welcomed.
     
  8. mcarroll

    mcarroll Well-Known Member R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Partner Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    Messages:
    8,144
    Likes Received:
    2,761
    Location:
    Virginia
    Lights and flow and nutrients......and that's assuming your water chemistry is steady. Any variation there can stall things out and even make ugly.
     

Share This Page

Loading...