Loss of colour in corals

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Hue

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I have been having a problem with my lps corals loosing their colour after being introduced into my tank, corals were healthy when purchased they had amazing colour but since i added them to my tank they had lost their colour after a week since being introduced into my tank and i cant figure out why that is this is mainly with my frog spawn and torch coral the acans seems to be doing well no loss in colour. I had tried a number of solutions but no success so far. I had started dosing alkalinity as when i tested for alk after i noticed the colour change it was at 6.7 dkh i am currently keeping it stable at around 8.5 dkh it been around 4 weeks with no visible improvement. I have tried increasing lighting, increasing nutrients, decreasing flow, changing coral placement and constantly testing water parameter. Current parameters: salinity- 1.025
alkalinity- 8.5 dkh
calcium- 480ppm
magnesium- 1380
phosphate- 0 on salifert test kit
nitrate- 2.5
Ph- 8.15
Salinity and temps are stable.

tank is 20 gallons 4 months old using chemi pure nano packets to help with algea. using ai prime hd lighting 9 inches above water level I also spot feed my corals. i will include pictures of light setting and pictures of corals. The torch is a indo gold, when purchased it had dark stems with gold running through them now it pale with light pink stems, frog spawn should have golden tips now they some are pale white or bright green.
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2A48C690-0EF6-446D-90EB-20EA5B5B6F5C.jpeg
20089E05-6106-468E-B2DA-E2639C56641A.jpeg
EC3C3C56-7C73-4DF4-A628-BAE0D0A8CFD2.jpeg
 
Zoanthids

vetteguy53081

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Insufficient lighting will not promote the zooxanthelle that distributes the color in coral along with flow
I run moderate light and water flow as I have a mixed reef.
 

tsouth

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What is your algae issue what warrants the use of Chemipure (which one? Blue? Elite?)? Are you trying to have 0 phosphates on purpose?
 
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Insufficient lighting will not promote the zooxanthelle that distributes the color in coral along with flow
I run moderate light and water flow as I have a mixed reef.
Insufficient lighting will not promote the zooxanthelle that distributes the color in coral along with flow
I run moderate light and water flow as I have a mixed reef.
Aright thank you, they should be getting moderate flow and light my ai prime blues and uv spectrum are maxed out and they are near the bottom so they should be getting sufficient lighting (i think)
 
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Hue

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What is your algae issue what warrants the use of Chemipure (which one? Blue? Elite?)? Are you trying to have 0 phosphates on purpose?
I have a small amount of bubble and slime algea in the tank so im trying keep the algae from going crazy since i feed quite heavy im using chemi pure blue nano packets current running 1 nano packet which is rated for 5 gallons was running 3 before but i noticed phos was at 0 so i reduced the amount to raise it
 
Fritz

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You need to dose phosphate to get the color back. Zoox are algae and their color is dependent on no3 and po4.
 

Dkmoo

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Depends on how the colors are changing.

Coral colors generally fall into the below observations. As far as I know the science behind the exact mechanism is not 100% confirmed so the below is based on what is observed and experimented on

Coral zooxanthellae is generally a brown color. As a symbiotic dino, it's density is regulated to a degree by the coral based on external factors. Generally speaking, if there is not enough light, coral will produce more so more light can be absorbed. This in turn will make the coral brown. Also, if there is too much no3/po4, it is assumed that the zoox can multiply out of coral control (since its a dino after all) which will also brown out the coral.

Conversely, if there is too much light, or if there are other environmental stressors, corals will expelling the zoox in order to to protect itself. This leads to corals change color by bleaching/turning white, since the coral tissue is transparent and yiu are seeing the bone color.

The above mechanism is the first such mechanism that alter coral color along the white/brown spectrum

The second has to do with the actual colors of the coral (red, green, blue, fluorescence, etc..). These colors are controlled by the various color and fluorescent proteins that the coral produces that is independent of the zoox density. It is thought that these protiens serve as a kind of "sun block" or "spectrum changer (in the case of fluorescent proteins)" such that the right density and spectrum of light reaches the zoox and aid in the optimal light absorption. What influences these color proteins is a matter of the correct light intensity and spectrum.

Finally, different colors protiens is also impacted by available trace element. If you do frequent water changes it should be OK. Otherwise you may want to start testing for the trace elements and start dosing. Check out redsea trace element abcd. For example

If you dont have a PAR meter, consider invest in one and it will take ALL the guesswork out of determining if your light is the right intensity and spectrum. A seneye isn't expensive and IMO an investment with very good ROI for long term coral success. Ie, I was able to save a few very expensive corals bc I got an accurate picture of what my light is doing.

Edit: autocorrect typos
 
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Hue

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Depends on how the colors are changing.

Coral colors generally fall into the below observations. As far as I know the science behind the exact mechanism is not 100% confirmed so the below is based on what is observed and experimented on

Coral zooxanthellae is generally a brown color. As a symbiotic dino, it's density is regulated to a degree by the coral based on external factors. Generally speaking, if there is not enough light, coral will produce more so more light can be absorbed. This in turn will make the coral brown. Also, if there is too much no3/po4, it is assumed that the zoox can multiply out of coral control (since its a dino after all) which will also brown out the coral.

Conversely, if there is too much light, or if there are other environmental stressors, corals will expelling the zoox in order to to protect itself. This leads to corals change color by bleaching/turning white, since the coral tissue is transparent and yiu are seeing the bone color.

The above mechanism is the first such mechanism that alter coral color along the white/brown spectrum

The second has to do with the actual colors of the coral (red, green, blue, fluorescence, etc..). These colors are controlled by the various color and fluorescent proteins that the coral produces that is independent of the zoox density. It is thought that these protiens serve as a kind of "sun block" or "spectrum changer (in the case of fluorescent proteins)" such that the right density and spectrum of light reaches the zoox and aid in the optimal light absorption. What influences these color proteins is a matter of the correct light intensity and spectrum.

Finally, different colors protiens is also impacted by available trace element. If you do frequent water changes it should be OK. Otherwise you may want to start testing for the trace elements and start dosing. Check out redsea trace element abcd. For example

If you dont have a PAR meter, consider invest in one and it will take ALL the guesswork out of determining if your light is the right intensity and spectrum. A seneye isn't expensive and IMO an investment with very good ROI for long term coral success. Ie, I was able to save a few very expensive corals bc I got an accurate picture of what my light is doing.

Edit: autocorrect typos
Depends on how the colors are changing.

Coral colors generally fall into the below observations. As far as I know the science behind the exact mechanism is not 100% confirmed so the below is based on what is observed and experimented on

Coral zooxanthellae is generally a brown color. As a symbiotic dino, it's density is regulated to a degree by the coral based on external factors. Generally speaking, if there is not enough light, coral will produce more so more light can be absorbed. This in turn will make the coral brown. Also, if there is too much no3/po4, it is assumed that the zoox can multiply out of coral control (since its a dino after all) which will also brown out the coral.

Conversely, if there is too much light, or if there are other environmental stressors, corals will expelling the zoox in order to to protect itself. This leads to corals change color by bleaching/turning white, since the coral tissue is transparent and yiu are seeing the bone color.

The above mechanism is the first such mechanism that alter coral color along the white/brown spectrum

The second has to do with the actual colors of the coral (red, green, blue, fluorescence, etc..). These colors are controlled by the various color and fluorescent proteins that the coral produces that is independent of the zoox density. It is thought that these protiens serve as a kind of "sun block" or "spectrum changer (in the case of fluorescent proteins)" such that the right density and spectrum of light reaches the zoox and aid in the optimal light absorption. What influences these color proteins is a matter of the correct light intensity and spectrum.

Finally, different colors protiens is also impacted by available trace element. If you do frequent water changes it should be OK. Otherwise you may want to start testing for the trace elements and start dosing. Check out redsea trace element abcd. For example

If you dont have a PAR meter, consider invest in one and it will take ALL the guesswork out of determining if your light is the right intensity and spectrum. A seneye isn't expensive and IMO an investment with very good ROI for long term coral success. Ie, I was able to save a few very expensive corals bc I got an accurate picture of what my light is doing.

Edit: autocorrect typos
Thanks for the help, just invested in a seneye
 

tsouth

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Thanks for the help, just invested in a seneye
With regards to feeding - definitely check your phosphates and let that speak for you. Increase your feedings +1 this week and test your phosphates. If it’s not enough, go +1 again.
 
Avast

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Awesome thanks it there anything specific you recommended dosing or should i just dump more pellets in the tank?
You need to dose pure sodium phosphate. Reagent grade or one for the planted tanks.
 
BRS

What percentage of blue versus white lighting do you think makes the best coral growth combo?

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  • All White

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    Votes: 9 1.5%
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