Nano reefers, talk me out of upgrading!...

ninjamyst

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i have a 90 and water changes are a PITA i would just replace some coral i have just bought a fluval evo 13.5 and only going to buy £400+ corals

this will be my 1st coral

IMG-20221102-WA0010.jpg
With 90 gallons you can get away with less water changes or even no water changes. IMO, big tanks are easier to maintain because you have a sump for more equipments. It is way more expensive though....
 
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I currently have a 16 gallon tank and it's starting to feel a little tight. I had to move a few things around this evening so my new urchin (dealing with some hair algae) doesn't topple them over and it's got me pondering the benefits of more space. Also some of my corals are getting quite sizeable, like my green hammer on the left, but I'm reluctant to frag or sell for now since I'm quite emotionally attached to them.

I don't necessarily want a bigger tank but I'm considering upgrading to a 36 gallon just for more breathing space. Talk me out of it! Or help me re-scape my current set up please!

IMG_0859.JPG


A few corals look a bit angry after moving them - Duncan at bottom right is really quite big too.
Personally, I would buy the a tank of similar size, mature it for a while, and then move some of your current corals into it, or, go without upgrading the tank size, and frag some of your corals. Whatever you think is best is what you should go with, whatever makes you happier and more content, you should do. Reefing is about having fun in animal husbandry, while keeping it ethical and humane, so as long as your corals like it, and you like it, keep it like that.
 

Dave1993

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With 90 gallons you can get away with less water changes or even no water changes. IMO, big tanks are easier to maintain because you have a sump for more equipments. It is way more expensive though....
Tell that too my 200+ nitrate
 
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fish farmer

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I currently have a 16 gallon tank and it's starting to feel a little tight. I had to move a few things around this evening so my new urchin (dealing with some hair algae) doesn't topple them over and it's got me pondering the benefits of more space. Also some of my corals are getting quite sizeable, like my green hammer on the left, but I'm reluctant to frag or sell for now since I'm quite emotionally attached to them.

I don't necessarily want a bigger tank but I'm considering upgrading to a 36 gallon just for more breathing space. Talk me out of it! Or help me re-scape my current set up please!

IMG_0859.JPG


A few corals look a bit angry after moving them - Duncan at bottom right is really quite big too.
At some point those toadstools will become shade trees.

I maximized space in my 29 gallon with vertical walls.
 

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