Need serious help. lost 90% of my tank. velvet? new tank syndrome?

Jake DiMeglio

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I need some serious help!!!! So long story here but very confusing and interesting. Any help is much appreciated!!!

So I have a waterbox 190 had it set up about 5-6 months. Used old rock from my two tanks I combined into one. All fish were over a year old and never a single problem. Never lost a fish in over a year. Put all the fish into the new tank over a months time. Tank was running for 5-6 months no problems. Water is pristine and all parameters were good.
I bought a middas blenny and a cleaner wrasse. (From my regular LFS, and these were the first new fish to the tank).

48 hours later my powder brown died and my sailfin tang had some black markings on it (the markings only last 48 hours and went away. He then developed a cloudy/pop eye. 24 hours later the new blenny died. 24 hours later the flame hawk died. 24 hours later my kole tang jumped out. 24 hours later coral beauty died. 24 hours later my female clown died. 24 hours later my make clown. 24 hours later the new cleaner wrasse jumped out. And 24 hours my cardinal died.

Sooooo... the only two fish left are my sailfin tang and 6 line wrasse. Also I have two anemones in the tank which look ok. They were totally unaffected but today looked a little weird and still.

During this entire time I was checking the water regularly and the parameters were always good. And to even double trip check I used two different test kits (Red Sea/api) and I had two local stores to me test it as well and the water is perfect. It never became cloudy or anything.

Both stores are not sure what could have done this since all the fish were eating and swimming fine and just drooled dead. And no two fish died at the same time. All exactly 24 hours apart. No fish had markings or anything.

No heaters are broken. No stray voltage. Nothing leaking into the tank. All fish were eating fine any nothing was changed in 5 months.
Reason I need help is. What do I do next!

Leave tank empty for 30 days 90 days? What do I do with the sailfin and 6 line wrasse?

I can’t look at an empty tank for 90 days.

i will upload Pictures are of sailfin when he had the makings for a day or two very soon.
 
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zalick

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Sorry for your lossed. Diseases are one of my weak spots. Following along to learn.
 

vetteguy53081

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There is an obvious condition occurring and it needs to be determined. To save the other two fish, A quarantine tank will be of benefit and no fish for 72-89 days is essential. I understand " looking at an empty tank" but at the same token you want to support future fish.
Petco has a $1 per gallon sale. . . . you can use for a QT tank
PLEASE DESCRIBE ANY UNUSUAL HABITS YOU NOTICED THE PAST WEEK:
Itching and scratching
darting
Heavy breathing
Red sores on body
white stringy poop
Fin and tail rot

And others as an example


Also:
Ammonia level
Salinity ( false readings will cause this disaster)
PH
Temperature
Type of filtration
 

Big G

captain dunsel
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Rapid deaths sounds like velvet. Sometimes fish can die from velvet before showing the external symptoms because the velvet parasites attack within the gills unseen.

 
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Jake DiMeglio

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There is an obvious condition occurring and it needs to be determined. To save the other two fish, A quarantine tank will be of benefit and no fish for 72-89 days is essential. I understand " looking at an empty tank" but at the same token you want to support future fish.
Petco has a $1 per gallon sale. . . . you can use for a QT tank
PLEASE DESCRIBE ANY UNUSUAL HABITS YOU NOTICED THE PAST WEEK:
Itching and scratching
darting
Heavy breathing
Red sores on body
white stringy poop
Fin and tail rot

And others as an example


Also:
Ammonia level
Salinity ( false readings will cause this disaster)
PH
Temperature
Type of filtration
I did notice one stringy poop on my cardinal that was it. The kole was itching on the sand a few times as well. other then that nothing.

Also:
Ammonia level 0
Salinity ( false readings will cause this disaster) 1.026
PH 8.2
Temperature 78
Type of filtration waterbox 190 sump (no UV sterilizer)
 
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Jake DiMeglio

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Rapid deaths sounds like velvet. Sometimes fish can die from velvet before showing the external symptoms because the velvet parasites attack within the gills unseen.

yea i guess this is what everyone is saying is the only option.
 

drawman

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What parameters have you tested and what are their values?

I am suspicious of velvet as well I'm assuming you didn't quarantine the new fish?
 
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Jake DiMeglio

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What parameters have you tested and what are their values?

I am suspicious of velvet as well I'm assuming you didn't quarantine the new fish?
Parameters were measured with 4 different kits. 2 of mine and 2 different fish stores. both stores reported back perfect levels. and no i did not QT the new blenny and wrasse. im going to assume they were the problem
 

Big G

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Parameters were measured with 4 different kits. 2 of mine and 2 different fish stores. both stores reported back perfect levels. and no i did not QT the new blenny and wrasse. im going to assume they were the problem
So sorry for your problems. The darn fish supply chain is rampant with disease/parasites. :(
 

vetteguy53081

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Sounds like velvet also. Velvet disease in saltwater fish is caused by the protozoan Amyloodinium ocellatum. This organism has many similarities to ich. The saltwater velvet organism contains chlorophyll and so it is often classified as an algae. The parasite produces some of its nutrients through the chlorophyll. This is why darkening your aquarium during a velvet outbreak is helpful in treating the disease during treatment.
Some of the things you would have noticed was a fine dusting or powdering on the fish. This dusting is actually comprised of many tiny whitish-yellow spots. A fish infected with marine velvet may refuse to eat, hold its fins close to its body, and may scrape itself on rocks in an attempt to dislodge the parasite. The fish may gasp for air and hang out at the tanks surface where the dissolved oxygen content is higher. Usually the gills are affected first and so the first symptom you may notice is increased breathing or laboring for oxygen.
Marine velvet parasite has two life stages. There is a free-swimming form, during which it is able to infect fish. There is also a cyst form in which the parasite undergoes a reproductive phase.
During the free-swimming stage the parasite propels itself through the water until it finds a suitable host, such as a fish. Once it finds a fish it will attach itself to the skin or gills of the fish and feed off of it. Eventually it forms a cyst.
This cyst falls off of the fish and then undergoes reproduction by cell division for about 3 days. At the end of this period the cyst releases many new Amyloodinium ocellatum in free-swimming form. These go in search of a new host (fish). If a host isn't found the parasite dies within 2-3 days. Unfortunately, in your aquarium, new hosts are readily available. When the free-swimming form finds a new host the cycle begins again.
So then on to treatment -
One treatment you can try, especially if only one or two fish are affected, is to give your saltwater fish a freshwater bath. The idea behind this is that the parasites will rapidly absorb lots of water through osmosis. Through the process of osmosis, water moves from areas of higher concentration to areas of lower concentration. Because the marine velvet parasite contains lots of salt, but not much water, this causes the parasite to fill so rapidly with water that it will burst when it is placed in freshwater.
To set up a freshwater bath you add 85% freshwater and 15% water from the aquarium. The temperature and pH must be matched to that in the aquarium. Also remember to use a dechlorinator. It is possible that your fish may go into shock. Don't leave your fish unattended during a freshwater bath and don't leave your fish in the bath for more than 10 minutes. If your fish is in distress you should remove it sooner than 10 minutes. The fish may lay on its side while in the bath, but if it appears to really be in distress get it out immediately and place it back in the aquarium. Most fish don't last the entire 10 minutes and so be prepared for this.
Other option is to treat with use of Copper sulfate which is an effective treatment for marine velvet, however, some fish such as clownfish, bannerfish, and other saltwater fish don't tolerate copper sulfate very well. Symptoms of copper poisoning are popeye, rapid breathing, and balancing problems when swimming. Caution also as copper sulfate will kill off the organisms living on live rock, invertebrates and live coral, and algae in the tank. This is why it is best if you can isolate the affected fish and treat it in its own tank.
If QT is not an option, and you need to treat the entire tank with inverts you can use an ultraviolet sterilization unit (UV). The ultraviolet light will kill some of the free-swimming velvet parasites, while leaving the invertebrates in a safe zone.
 
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Jake DiMeglio

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Sounds like velvet also. Velvet disease in saltwater fish is caused by the protozoan Amyloodinium ocellatum. This organism has many similarities to ich. The saltwater velvet organism contains chlorophyll and so it is often classified as an algae. The parasite produces some of its nutrients through the chlorophyll. This is why darkening your aquarium during a velvet outbreak is helpful in treating the disease during treatment.
Some of the things you would have noticed was a fine dusting or powdering on the fish. This dusting is actually comprised of many tiny whitish-yellow spots. A fish infected with marine velvet may refuse to eat, hold its fins close to its body, and may scrape itself on rocks in an attempt to dislodge the parasite. The fish may gasp for air and hang out at the tanks surface where the dissolved oxygen content is higher. Usually the gills are affected first and so the first symptom you may notice is increased breathing or laboring for oxygen.
Marine velvet parasite has two life stages. There is a free-swimming form, during which it is able to infect fish. There is also a cyst form in which the parasite undergoes a reproductive phase.
During the free-swimming stage the parasite propels itself through the water until it finds a suitable host, such as a fish. Once it finds a fish it will attach itself to the skin or gills of the fish and feed off of it. Eventually it forms a cyst.
This cyst falls off of the fish and then undergoes reproduction by cell division for about 3 days. At the end of this period the cyst releases many new Amyloodinium ocellatum in free-swimming form. These go in search of a new host (fish). If a host isn't found the parasite dies within 2-3 days. Unfortunately, in your aquarium, new hosts are readily available. When the free-swimming form finds a new host the cycle begins again.
So then on to treatment -
One treatment you can try, especially if only one or two fish are affected, is to give your saltwater fish a freshwater bath. The idea behind this is that the parasites will rapidly absorb lots of water through osmosis. Through the process of osmosis, water moves from areas of higher concentration to areas of lower concentration. Because the marine velvet parasite contains lots of salt, but not much water, this causes the parasite to fill so rapidly with water that it will burst when it is placed in freshwater.
To set up a freshwater bath you add 85% freshwater and 15% water from the aquarium. The temperature and pH must be matched to that in the aquarium. Also remember to use a dechlorinator. It is possible that your fish may go into shock. Don't leave your fish unattended during a freshwater bath and don't leave your fish in the bath for more than 10 minutes. If your fish is in distress you should remove it sooner than 10 minutes. The fish may lay on its side while in the bath, but if it appears to really be in distress get it out immediately and place it back in the aquarium. Most fish don't last the entire 10 minutes and so be prepared for this.
Other option is to treat with use of Copper sulfate which is an effective treatment for marine velvet, however, some fish such as clownfish, bannerfish, and other saltwater fish don't tolerate copper sulfate very well. Symptoms of copper poisoning are popeye, rapid breathing, and balancing problems when swimming. Caution also as copper sulfate will kill off the organisms living on live rock, invertebrates and live coral, and algae in the tank. This is why it is best if you can isolate the affected fish and treat it in its own tank.
If QT is not an option, and you need to treat the entire tank with inverts you can use an ultraviolet sterilization unit (UV). The ultraviolet light will kill some of the free-swimming velvet parasites, while leaving the invertebrates in a safe zone.
thank you for the time and explaination. im going to set up two QT tanks now i guess. one with copper one without. i also need a trap in order to get the two fish left out and a 6 week fishless tank. exciting times.
 

drawman

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Parameters were measured with 4 different kits. 2 of mine and 2 different fish stores. both stores reported back perfect levels. and no i did not QT the new blenny and wrasse. im going to assume they were the problem
Was ammonia tested? Again just trying to rule things out. "Itching" on the sand is definitely a concern as you described and my eyes would be on velvet.
 
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Jake DiMeglio

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the tang is eating like a champ still nori frozen and pellets. waiting on new filter for QT and then need to find a way to get them out of the tank
 
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Spar

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i didnt think they could carry velvet
Not in the free-swimming stage, but they can and do attach anything hard, such as shells during the cyst stage. I lost all my fish to Velvet about 6-8 months ago from adding snails. Everything else had been thoroughly QT'd; fish with copper or CP, inverts/etc with 90 days isolation.

So unfortunately I can confirm first-hand this happens.
 
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