Please help me silently light this tank

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Dave-T

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Hey Luc! The tank will be 70x28x28. The canopy isn’t built yet. It will be a mixed reef, but I want to be sure I have enough light to grow SPS. My wife wants to minimize the canopy height, so we don’t want it any taller then necessary. Can you recommend a Coralcare configuration for this setup? I’d be willing to add light bars if it helped.

And can you explain why that table is innacurate? At a minimum, wouldn’t more LEDs per square inch help with cutting down on disco effect? Seems like it would also help with coverage and shadowing. And wouldn’t higher watts per sq inch increase PAR and penetration? I realize it’s harder for passively cooled lights to compete in those metrics, but that doesn’t mean those metrics aren’t relevant factors in lighting a tank..
 
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Luc Vogels

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Hey Luc! The tank will be 70x28x28. The canopy isn’t built yet. It will be a mixed reef, but I want to be sure I have enough light to grow SPS. My wife wants to minimize the canopy height, so we don’t want it any taller then necessary. Can you recommend a Coralcare configuration for this setup? I’d be willing to add light bars if it helped.

And can you explain why that table is innacurate? At a minimum, wouldn’t more LEDs per square inch help with cutting down on disco effect? Seems like it would also help with coverage and shadowing. And wouldn’t higher watts per sq inch increase PAR and penetration? I realize it’s harder for passively cooled lights to compete in those metrics, but that doesn’t mean those metrics aren’t relevant factors in lighting a tank..

Regarding the first point..
I assume these measures are inch (not foot or centimeters ;)).
In this case I would suggest to use 3 luminaires and orient them in such way the short end of the luminaire is perpendicular to the front glass. In this configuration I recommend to have ~8inch distance between the water surface and the glass of the fixture.
We often see that people desire an open tank but worry about light spill or having a "technical/industrial" looking solution above the tank. The CoralCare units have some connection points on the sides which enables them to attach directly to a canopy. Here is one very simple example shared on our facebook group:

173156753_1810301319129876_2767713598570308600_n.jpg

link

In this image you can see that it is installed rather high above the water surface. Looking at the beamshape at the sides of the tank you can see it could be much closer to the water surface (without losing any coverage). Sometimes people to take this penalty (all light outside of the tank is considered loss) to be able to work more easily above the tank. Personally I have made a lift system for this : https://www.reef2reef.com/threads/luc-vogelss-300-gallon-coralcare-reef.271225/page-13#post-9916421 a bit "overdone" but keep in mind that a very homogeneous light distribution in combination with a canopy can limit your working space in the tank (especially when you also want to add additional lightbars).

How is the tank build technically? Are there any glass strips? And what about the location of the tank? Close to a couch or to a dining table? The lower your sitting area is ( a couch is a good example) the more likely you are annoyed with glare from the lamp. If you are sitting close to it I would suggest to make the canopy stick out a little bit on the bottom. Example over here:
218569039_563830301297838_5276627314645120476_n.jpg


Regarding your table; it does not take into account any effect of the applied optics.

The GHL mitras for instance has 6 clusters which ensure a proper colormixing (eventhough the LED's are spaced further away from eachother). The CoralCare has an internal lightguide and diffusor which actually increases the active area much further (almost the entire front window emits light eventhough the LED's are spaced further (what without optics indeed results in poorly mixed colors). With my remark I just wanted to state that it is very difficult to compare different types of lighting (and lighting technologies!) in a single metric.

My own opinion is of course a bit biased but if you are looking for a luminaire with a very decent and reliable build quality; an excellent spectrum and extremely homogeneous light distribution; Coralcare might be the one for you. And as indicated before; the fixture is passively cooled; hence no noise but also more weight (15lbs). But in the long run you are paying for reliability and stability.. something which is key for this hobby.
 
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Dave-T

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Regarding the first point..
I assume these measures are inch (not foot or centimeters ;)).
In this case I would suggest to use 3 luminaires and orient them in such way the short end of the luminaire is perpendicular to the front glass. In this configuration I recommend to have ~8inch distance between the water surface and the glass of the fixture.
We often see that people desire an open tank but worry about light spill or having a "technical/industrial" looking solution above the tank. The CoralCare units have some connection points on the sides which enables them to attach directly to a canopy. Here is one very simple example shared on our facebook group:

173156753_1810301319129876_2767713598570308600_n.jpg

link

In this image you can see that it is installed rather high above the water surface. Looking at the beamshape at the sides of the tank you can see it could be much closer to the water surface (without losing any coverage). Sometimes people to take this penalty (all light outside of the tank is considered loss) to be able to work more easily above the tank. Personally I have made a lift system for this : https://www.reef2reef.com/threads/luc-vogelss-300-gallon-coralcare-reef.271225/page-13#post-9916421 a bit "overdone" but keep in mind that a very homogeneous light distribution in combination with a canopy can limit your working space in the tank (especially when you also want to add additional lightbars).

How is the tank build technically? Are there any glass strips? And what about the location of the tank? Close to a couch or to a dining table? The lower your sitting area is ( a couch is a good example) the more likely you are annoyed with glare from the lamp. If you are sitting close to it I would suggest to make the canopy stick out a little bit on the bottom. Example over here:
218569039_563830301297838_5276627314645120476_n.jpg


Regarding your table; it does not take into account any effect of the applied optics.

The GHL mitras for instance has 6 clusters which ensure a proper colormixing (eventhough the LED's are spaced further away from eachother). The CoralCare has an internal lightguide and diffusor which actually increases the active area much further (almost the entire front window emits light eventhough the LED's are spaced further (what without optics indeed results in poorly mixed colors). With my remark I just wanted to state that it is very difficult to compare different types of lighting (and lighting technologies!) in a single metric.

My own opinion is of course a bit biased but if you are looking for a luminaire with a very decent and reliable build quality; an excellent spectrum and extremely homogeneous light distribution; Coralcare might be the one for you. And as indicated before; the fixture is passively cooled; hence no noise but also more weight (15lbs). But in the long run you are paying for reliability and stability.. something which is key for this hobby.

Thanks. So the tank will be next to our kitchen table. As you said, we are indeed planning on a canopy to help block light spill. And also to not have an "industrial look". I'm thinking a lot taller canopy than the one above, perhaps resting on the tank. With the light assembly mounting to the top of the canopy.

In that last picture you sent, there is a light bar in the back. I can't tell if there's another one in the front, I guess it's there to provide more coverage, and help add shimmer? As you say, a light bar in the front might make it hard to get into the tank. Maybe we could come up with some way to get the light assembly out of the way to get into the tank, but I can't think of how that could be done. And the tank will have eurobracing, with (I think) a single pane of glass down the middle.
 
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Luc Vogels

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Thanks. So the tank will be next to our kitchen table. As you said, we are indeed planning on a canopy to help block light spill. And also to not have an "industrial look". I'm thinking a lot taller canopy than the one above, perhaps resting on the tank. With the light assembly mounting to the top of the canopy.

In that last picture you sent, there is a light bar in the back. I can't tell if there's another one in the front, I guess it's there to provide more coverage, and help add shimmer? As you say, a light bar in the front might make it hard to get into the tank. Maybe we could come up with some way to get the light assembly out of the way to get into the tank, but I can't think of how that could be done. And the tank will have eurobracing, with (I think) a single pane of glass down the middle.

I cannot find the pictures but I have seen examples of tanks with closed lids and the fixtures integrated on the top of the lid. This way you do not have to worry about cooling (natural convection over the top of your lid) and you are able to open the lid to the back (if you fixate the lamps to the lid ofc). It is no problem to implement the Coralcare fixture in an closed lid; as long as the lid air temperature stays below 45 degree. Often a simple fan (or just sufficient space is enough.
 
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Dave-T

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@Luc Vogels - my installer told me that the Coralcare manual says that they must be hung and can't be in a canopy where the temp could exceed 95 degrees F. So this isn’t true? Because I'd like to mount them in an open top canopy that rests on the tank. I might be ok with putting some quiet computer fans in the canopy if necessary... You said the temp can’t go above 45. What happens if it does?
 
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@Luc Vogels - my installer told me that the Coralcare manual says that they must be hung and can't be in a canopy where the temp could exceed 95 degrees F. So this isn’t true? Because I'd like to mount them in an open top canopy that rests on the tank. I might be ok with putting some quiet computer fans in the canopy if necessary... You said the temp can’t go above 45. What happens if it does?
If you have a open top, then the risk of elevated temps seems pretty low.
 

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@Luc Vogels - my installer told me that the Coralcare manual says that they must be hung and can't be in a canopy where the temp could exceed 95 degrees F. So this isn’t true? Because I'd like to mount them in an open top canopy that rests on the tank. I might be ok with putting some quiet computer fans in the canopy if necessary... You said the temp can’t go above 45. What happens if it does?
You don't want to overheat the electronics which are all in the fixture. Basically shorten lifespan.
As I understand it mosly any electrolytic capacitors. "at the diode" temps could reach a point of effecting their lifespan as well. I'd trust the manuf. (in this case) recommendations.

There are numerous ways to attack this issue.

First keep in mind that the led heat is mostly up so in an open top not much of an issue.
You can install light balled vents in order to bring in room air.
I'm sure Phillips has a heat map showing wher and where the heat goes.

Convection currents will pull it in with the chimney effect from the heat sink.
Found this quickly as a possible example, though a simple hole/grate and a thin board on standoffs works as good.
How effective this is is ???
Good thing is led light is pretty directional down so less chance of light being pushed into baffle port

https://www.hawkusa.com/manufacture...6q1EanfuuF_lW6JW75i9YTrKsaFtUMscaAp9PEALw_wcB

Like I said, just for reference.... sure someones built such a thing in a hood esp. w/ metal halides.
I find it a bit hard to imagine hitting 95F in a canopy of leds unless your room temp is in the 80's plus.

Fans are a possibility though that would generally increase evapotranspiration rates.

Trick is orientation of vents and fans.
and I can only guess.
Using the generic profile below fans should run so as to provide air though the channels of the heatsink fins.
Passive air should be best coming in below the light face or so.
I'm not a thermal engineer and only using a limited logic set here..but you need to disturb the boundary layer that forms.

heatmap.JPG
 
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Dave-T

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You don't want to overheat the electronics which are all in the fixture. Basically shorten lifespan.
As I understand it mosly any electrolytic capacitors. "at the diode" temps could reach a point of effecting their lifespan as well. I'd trust the manuf. (in this case) recommendations.

There are numerous ways to attack this issue.

First keep in mind that the led heat is mostly up so in an open top not much of an issue.
You can install light balled vents in order to bring in room air.
I'm sure Phillips has a heat map showing wher and where the heat goes.

Convection currents will pull it in with the chimney effect from the heat sink.
Found this quickly as a possible example, though a simple hole/grate and a thin board on standoffs works as good.
How effective this is is ???
Good thing is led light is pretty directional down so less chance of light being pushed into baffle port

https://www.hawkusa.com/manufacture...6q1EanfuuF_lW6JW75i9YTrKsaFtUMscaAp9PEALw_wcB

Like I said, just for reference.... sure someones built such a thing in a hood esp. w/ metal halides.
I find it a bit hard to imagine hitting 95F in a canopy of leds unless your room temp is in the 80's plus.

Fans are a possibility though that would generally increase evapotranspiration rates.

Trick is orientation of vents and fans.
and I can only guess.
Using the generic profile below fans should run so as to provide air though the channels of the heatsink fins.
Passive air should be best coming in below the light face or so.
I'm not a thermal engineer and only using a limited logic set here..but you need to disturb the boundary layer that forms.

heatmap.JPG
Thanks! I will have an ATO, so evaporation isn’t a huge concern.
 
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Luc Vogels

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Thanks! I will have an ATO, so evaporation isn’t a huge concern.
Our claim in the FAQ:
In what environment can I install the CoralCare fixture? The CoralCare fixture should be installed in an
area with a maximum ambient temperature of 35°C/95°F to ensure the lifetime of 25,000 hours at 100%
light output. Any reduction in the light output or ambient temperature will help to prolong the lifetime.
The fixture can be installed in an enclosed (or partly enclosed) canopy as long as there is some air
circulation and the ambient temperature does not exceed 35°C/95°F.

Effectively you could go a bit higher without having any negative impact. I do not recommend letting the ambient temperature exceed 45 degree. In reality with the slightest airflow this also wil not happen since the water temperature is below 30 (and the water starts to cool the air). With an open top canopy you do not have to worry what so ever.
 
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Dave-T

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Thanks!

And a question - where can I find the Dana Riddle light reviews? I see them discussed on the forum, but I can't see where to get the actual reviews.
 
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