Questions About Copepods

Zach72202

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I've got some questions about copepods in general.

What do they really do? I am assuming micro clean up crew basically.

When do you usually add them? When you start to get algae?

Do they really tolerate ammonia at all or are they super sensitive?

What types should I get and what are some good ones to go with? Is there a package deal?

Pods for dragonets? I have read tibse are the go to for them, but I assume they will eat whatever if they are hungry.

Anything else I really need to know about them?

Just looking for some info that doesn't come from a sellers bias.

If there is a general guide I missed, sorry about that.

Thank you for reading!

I've got some questions about copepods in general.

What do they really do? I am assuming micro clean up crew basically.

When do you usually add them? When you start to get algae?

Do they really tolerate ammonia at all or are they super sensitive?

What types should I get and what are some good ones to go with? Is there a package deal?

Pods for dragonets? I have read tibse are the go to for them, but I assume they will eat whatever if they are hungry.

Anything else I really need to know about them?

Just looking for some info that doesn't come from a sellers bias.

If there is a general guide I missed, sorry about that.

Thank you for reading!

Micro clean up crew.
Food for higher ups.
Add any time it's safe for inverts.
Algaebarn 5280 good start.
I think they are part of a healthy tank.
Might keep some bad guys in check.

Put some of your tank water under a microscope and you will see all sorts of things depending on your magnification. Diversity is a great thing and reproducing food for your fish is a also a bonus. I will say my tank looks much much better since I added pods.

Biggest thing is dont worry too much over your pods once you add them. They will find their way into your tank anyways. Just have a safe spot for them to hide and reproduce in your sump. Algae in a refugium or just some porous rock in your sump and then just carry on with life. If you want to increase the population size dose phyto. You will have plenty in there even if you don't.

I've got some questions about copepods in general.

What do they really do? I am assuming micro clean up crew basically.

When do you usually add them? When you start to get algae?

Do they really tolerate ammonia at all or are they super sensitive?

What types should I get and what are some good ones to go with? Is there a package deal?

Pods for dragonets? I have read tibse are the go to for them, but I assume they will eat whatever if they are hungry.

Anything else I really need to know about them?

Just looking for some info that doesn't come from a sellers bias.

If there is a general guide I missed, sorry about that.

Thank you for reading!
Agree with everything above, but want to add more re: dragonet/mandarins. Their digestive system isn't like other fish, they must constantly eat. Pods, etc will also be eaten by most everything else in tank. Unless you have a serious commitment to feeding them, dosing pods & baby brine shrimp, ... too many starve... its sad... This is a useful post. I found blue Pex for down tube, but hunting black to help it "blend" more into tank...

Great questions!

In general, copepods and other microfauna are a natural part of any balanced, healthy biosystem. There are many different species, and each of which plays a different role in your tank.

However, generally speaking, the only time you really need to "worry" about them is if you are trying to provide a home for difficult-to-feed species of fish that relies on them for a mainstay of their diet (such as a dragon goby, as you mention).

If you are not keeping these species, then do not worry about adding 'pods or trying to cultivate them. You will eventually get them anyway, and they don't provide a significant impact on the "clean up crew" to make a difference. So don't waste your money or lose sleep over it.

If, however, you DO plan on trying to keep a fish that really requires a robust 'pod colony, then I highly recommend you think about seeding your tank with a pod culture that includes a variety of species, and then supplement your feeding schedule with phytoplankton to help the pod culture grow BEFORE you try and add you fish that really count on them.

If this is your case, I recommend Algae Barn. They are very reliable and have a lot of really great material on their website.

Check them out here:




Okay. That's all really helpful! I appreciate the information! I think there are a few in there already, but in so small amounts it's basically un-noticeable. I got some in my nano tank from coral frags. I'll look into the algaebarn products and keep the 5280 in mind. Thank you!

As for a dragonet. I plan to train to eat frozen, then feed once to twice a day. It is an all in one tank, but I have been doing some serious thinking of how to hot rod the filters in the back to make a small fuge for macro, and then make layers for physical, and biological filtration. I am kinda liking the "tinker with it until max efficient" idea in saltwater. Also once I get going with corals will be using some carbon to help with chemicals.

Thank you all for the replies. Much appreciated!
 
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