Quick I was trying to catch ghost shrimp for fishing and I took them home in a livewell and they had babies...

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Amethyst

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These are some pictures I took with my phone because I lost my gopro, my phone was submerged a few weeks prior so the color is a little weird and it is a little more foggy. The only thing to know is the fins are more red than in the picture and the colors are less dull than in the picture.
uhh hello?
 
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The TDO chroma boost size small came in. I put like 3 pinches of it in the water, some got picked up by the filter but most are on the bottom. after about a minute the ghost shrimp realized there was food and they love it! they feel around and when they find it, they quickly grab it and eat it so fast. Faster than any other time, I think they really like it.

edit: in the paper it said to keep it refrigerated at about 41 degrees F and my fridge is 35 degrees F and I keep it in there, is it still ok?
 

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The TDO chroma boost size small came in. I put like 3 pinches of it in the water, some got picked up by the filter but most are on the bottom. after about a minute the ghost shrimp realized there was food and they love it! they feel around and when they find it, they quickly grab it and eat it so fast. Faster than any other time, I think they really like it.

edit: in the paper it said to keep it refrigerated at about 41 degrees F and my fridge is 35 degrees F and I keep it in there, is it still ok?
Bulk Reef Supply's site says 33-42F for it, so I'd guess 35 is fine.
 
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Bulk Reef Supply's site says 33-42F for it, so I'd guess 35 is fine.
ok great, alse last week I caught a bunch of baby shrimp I dont know their name but you buy them in stores and they were like less than an inch and all of them were eaten is that good food source for my creatures?

my creatures include: about 3 scallops, like 5-6 ghost shrimp, baby kelp bass, a bunch of little mudfish type things less than inch, 1 inch swimmer crab, a baby Dungeness crab, a big clam, a medium sized clam, and 2 wiggly starfish.

I have like 5 inches of sand and most of them are under it almost all day so only a few creatures are at the surface during the day; about 6 on surface at a time, all creatures alive and doing well.
 
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ok great, alse last week I caught a bunch of baby shrimp I dont know their name but you buy them in stores and they were like less than an inch and all of them were eaten is that good food source for my creatures?

my creatures include: about 3 scallops, like 5-6 ghost shrimp, baby kelp bass, a bunch of little mudfish type things less than inch, 1 inch swimmer crab, a baby Dungeness crab, a big clam, a medium sized clam, and 2 wiggly starfish.

I have like 5 inches of sand and most of them are under it almost all day so only a few creatures are at the surface during the day; about 6 on surface at a time, all creatures alive and doing well.
Shrimp are generally a great food source.

Scallops and clams are particularly difficult to feed, so I wouldn't expect them to last more than a few months. The crabs (depending on the swimmer crab's species) and kelp bass will outgrow a ten gallon tank - I'd imagine they would outgrow it pretty quickly, but I don't know for sure. The crabs you could probably keep long term in bigger tanks (depending on the swimmer crab's species, you might be able to go as small as 20-40 gallons for a good tank for it, or you may need to go substantially larger; the dungeness crab, from recommendations I've seen, I would guess you need at a minimum a 125-150 gallon tank, preferably larger). Kelp/Calico Bass can grow up to 28 inches (they should grow to about 4 inches the first year from what I've read), so you'd need a really big tank (probably 300-400 or more gallons, depending on how active the fish is) to keep that one in long term. The mudfish may or may not be fine depending on their species.

Do you know what species of starfish you are keeping? The starfish will likely outgrow the tank too, and - depending on the species - may or may not be incredibly difficult to keep for more than a few months. There have been a few coldwater species of starfish that have been successfully aquacultured (bred) in captivity (in lab settings), though, so you may be able to figure out what to feed yours and how to keep them successfully long term as well.

Good to hear things are going well right now!
 

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Just some info. I keep my Tide pool temperate tanks at 64 deg. Cabrillo Aquarium (SoCal only species related) keeps theirs at 55 deg. Tide pool creatures tend to tolerate warmer temperatures. Obviously the Catalina goby has a pretty big range since it is also sold for tropical systems. Snails, limpets, Brittle Stars seem to have a huge tolerance on everything. I have a shore crab that snuck into my tropical 40G and is happy as a clam. I just tore down a 3g tank that started leaking and it took a bit for me to do, so a bunch evaporated out of it. the salinity was north of mid 40's but sure enough there was a couple of brittles still going. I believe the mention of "wiggly starfish" would be a brittle star. They actually reproduce fairy easily, I actually stopped trying to save every one when I do water changes. She can feed her clamps and scallops phyto and they will do well.
 

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Just some info. I keep my Tide pool temperate tanks at 64 deg. Cabrillo Aquarium (SoCal only species related) keeps theirs at 55 deg. Tide pool creatures tend to tolerate warmer temperatures. Obviously the Catalina goby has a pretty big range since it is also sold for tropical systems. Snails, limpets, Brittle Stars seem to have a huge tolerance on everything. I have a shore crab that snuck into my tropical 40G and is happy as a clam. I just tore down a 3g tank that started leaking and it took a bit for me to do, so a bunch evaporated out of it. the salinity was north of mid 40's but sure enough there was a couple of brittles still going. I believe the mention of "wiggly starfish" would be a brittle star. They actually reproduce fairy easily, I actually stopped trying to save every one when I do water changes. She can feed her clamps and scallops phyto and they will do well.
Yeah, many tidepool species can handle higher temps (they frequently have to be able to in order to survive summer heatwaves, as I understand it), but I’ve heard it can shorten their overall lifespan if the temp is too high for too long (if I recall correctly, I believe I’ve heard of this being a problem for Catalina Gobies, Blue Spot Jawfish, and Margarita Snails).

I didn’t even consider brittle stars - yeah, those would be easy to keep.

With the bivalves and phyto, I’ve heard some really mixed results from that (likely due to differences between species) - particularly with scallops - but you’re right, I shouldn’t dismiss their survival odds so quickly (especially since I know at least a handful of bivalves have been aquacultured using phytoplankton). OP, I’d try feeding the clams and scallops phyto and see how they do.
 
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Shrimp are generally a great food source.

Scallops and clams are particularly difficult to feed, so I wouldn't expect them to last more than a few months. The crabs (depending on the swimmer crab's species) and kelp bass will outgrow a ten gallon tank - I'd imagine they would outgrow it pretty quickly, but I don't know for sure. The crabs you could probably keep long term in bigger tanks (depending on the swimmer crab's species, you might be able to go as small as 20-40 gallons for a good tank for it, or you may need to go substantially larger; the dungeness crab, from recommendations I've seen, I would guess you need at a minimum a 125-150 gallon tank, preferably larger). Kelp/Calico Bass can grow up to 28 inches (they should grow to about 4 inches the first year from what I've read), so you'd need a really big tank (probably 300-400 or more gallons, depending on how active the fish is) to keep that one in long term. The mudfish may or may not be fine depending on their species.

Do you know what species of starfish you are keeping? The starfish will likely outgrow the tank too, and - depending on the species - may or may not be incredibly difficult to keep for more than a few months. There have been a few coldwater species of starfish that have been successfully aquacultured (bred) in captivity (in lab settings), though, so you may be able to figure out what to feed yours and how to keep them successfully long term as well.

Good to hear things are going well right now!
my dad would never in a million years buy a tank more than 50-100 gallons, I will probably have to sell the kelp bass to another person or an aquarium when it gets that large.
When I left for the beach I saw one of my ghost shrimp molting and I was really exited, I left for 7 hours and came back and it was fully molted, but half of it's head is missing and now I am starting to wonder who is the murderer that has been killing these shrimp, I think the crabs are a suspect but they are so tiny, maybe the ghost shrimp with the big claw (OH WAIT, IT FRICKIN DIED TOO BY AN UNKNOWN MURDERER!), maybe something else in the tank? What ever is killing these isn't something small in the water because you can physically see the big damage to their bodies.
 

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Yeah, many tidepool species can handle higher temps (they frequently have to be able to in order to survive summer heatwaves, as I understand it), but I’ve heard it can shorten their overall lifespan if the temp is too high for too long (if I recall correctly, I believe I’ve heard of this being a problem for Catalina Gobies, Blue Spot Jawfish, and Margarita Snails).

I didn’t even consider brittle stars - yeah, those would be easy to keep.

With the bivalves and phyto, I’ve heard some really mixed results from that (likely due to differences between species) - particularly with scallops - but you’re right, I shouldn’t dismiss their survival odds so quickly (especially since I know at least a handful of bivalves have been aquacultured using phytoplankton). OP, I’d try feeding the clams and scallops phyto and see how they do.
The place where I get my bulletproof Phyto is
They are a breeder and nursery for mussels and clams, Tet Iso, and Cha is the only thing they use to bring Bivalves into this world and maintain them. I have a variety of bivalves in my temperate tanks and they are doing well. But I must say they also get Aminos, pods, frozen food sludge and what ever else comes in with my weekly kelp samples.
I do not doubt the claim for a shorter life span with colder water animals acclimatized to a warmer environment. I had two groups of tide pool sculpins one group in one of the temperate tanks and the other in an ambient temp tank 68-74deg. The Sculpins in the warmer tank were very active, while the fish in the cooler tank, mostly a bump on a log until feeding time.
The process she is going through is great! Not only does it help create a scientific mind, but goes a long way into understanding our future. Which is the oceans.
 
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There are parasites in my shrimp's gill flaps (or at least I think, it might be baby shrimp; it looks like they have 3 eyes), I will send videos of this soon with high quality pictures/videos using my dad's camera
 
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my dad would never in a million years buy a tank more than 50-100 gallons, I will probably have to sell the kelp bass to another person or an aquarium when it gets that large.
When I left for the beach I saw one of my ghost shrimp molting and I was really exited, I left for 7 hours and came back and it was fully molted, but half of it's head is missing and now I am starting to wonder who is the murderer that has been killing these shrimp, I think the crabs are a suspect but they are so tiny, maybe the ghost shrimp with the big claw (OH WAIT, IT FRICKIN DIED TOO BY AN UNKNOWN MURDERER!), maybe something else in the tank? What ever is killing these isn't something small in the water because you can physically see the big damage to their bodies.
I know at least some inverts are particularly vulnerable while molting, so it may well have been taken out by one of the other inhabitants.
There are parasites in my shrimp's gill flaps (or at least I think, it might be baby shrimp; it looks like they have 3 eyes), I will send videos of this soon with high quality pictures/videos using my dad's camera
It’s most likely a parasite - these shrimp are actually known for very commonly hosting two different parasitic pod species.

The place where I get my bulletproof Phyto is
They are a breeder and nursery for mussels and clams, Tet Iso, and Cha is the only thing they use to bring Bivalves into this world and maintain them. I have a variety of bivalves in my temperate tanks and they are doing well. But I must say they also get Aminos, pods, frozen food sludge and what ever else comes in with my weekly kelp samples.
I do not doubt the claim for a shorter life span with colder water animals acclimatized to a warmer environment. I had two groups of tide pool sculpins one group in one of the temperate tanks and the other in an ambient temp tank 68-74deg. The Sculpins in the warmer tank were very active, while the fish in the cooler tank, mostly a bump on a log until feeding time.
The process she is going through is great! Not only does it help create a scientific mind, but goes a long way into understanding our future. Which is the oceans.
That looks like a very high quality phyto provider! Very few places list their density on the bottle like that. I’m surprised I haven’t run across their site before - thank you for the link! Yeah, there are quite a few species of bivalve that can be reared on those phyto species (enough that I'm wondering a bit if most bivalve issues come from feeding either the wrong species of phyto or not enough of the right one), but I do know there are some that don't do well on those. The New Zealand Cockle, for example, seems to struggle when people go with traditional phyto feeding methods, and at least one study (conducted using stable isotopes) found that those cockles may actually primarily consume macroalgae (I'd assume, possibly/probably inaccurately, in the form of phytoplankton sized detritus coming off the macro itself) - so it would make sense that feeding phyto may not work for them.

Out of curiosity, though, how long have you had your different bivalves, and do you have any idea what species they are? I ask because at least some can go months without feeding before they die, and some bivalves also seem to be eating when they're actually not (see the Jay Hemdal quote in the linked post below).
 

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Out of curiosity, though, how long have you had your different bivalves, and do you have any idea what species they are? I ask because at least some can go months without feeding before they die, and some bivalves also seem to be eating when they're actually not (see the Jay Hemdal quote in the linked post below).
At least two years on some. I have standard shore mussels, California mussels, Pacific littleneck, A couple California oysters and a couple rock oysters. Some of which I have grown from spat. All of my bivalves have shown growth. Like I said there is plenty of food sources that I provide along with the phyto. One note I must say my smaller bivalves have now become a food source for my Batstar.
 
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General discussion and questions about my tank because I am noob at this
I have many creatures, all caught from the beach with a net (even a 1 inch kelp bass) and I keep them in my 10gal tank, my dad is considering buying a 50 gal
(this thread is suppose to last a long time so I might have a 25gal or 50gal or maybe higher by the time you are reading this, as of December 1st 2022 I only have a 10 gallon tank)
uhm this is quote from new thread idk if you can click this I think I will send link idk if that link only works on my side or what tell me if you can click it
 

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