Reef or Fowlr Aquarium

Fishbird

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If you want an aquarium that would last for years I would slow down and do a lot more research. Figure out what you want to end up with and I think you (or anybody) will be more likely to do the work to keep it going. If what you want is a reef, than plan a reef tank. Stocking of fish, inverts and corals should take place slowly over weeks or months or years so it doesn’t matter if a particular invert is in stock at this moment. You’ve also listed off a lot of fish that will outgrow a 40 breeder so since you want this tank to last for years I’d look at build threads and full tank shots. See which tanks look good to you. Look at their stocking lists and then research what the fish in question needs. LiveAquaria has good size guidelines. If you find threads about a fish on a forum and most people are saying don’t do it and one or two are saying it’s fine, listen to the crowd (or at least find out a lot more from those saying it’s fine. How long have they had the fish? Is the fish mature (so territorial)? How long has the fish lived with its current tankmates etc)

finally, you can add equipment down the line. I would watch BRS 52 weeks of reefing as well as their other videos to understand why various pieces of equipment are used. Then you can decide if you need them for your system. You definitely won’t need everything.
 
Top Shelf Aquatics

clekchau

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With FOWLR I highly recommend two filters; one canister and one HOB. The HOB doesn't have to be anything huge (although my preference is the Seachem Tidal-110).
Size your canister filter for the basic volume of the tank and run it with Course/Medium foam and biomedia (no floss, fine foam, polishing pad, carbon etc.) Just let it do its bacterial thing.
Use the HOB as your skimmer/polisher with stages of medium foam/floss/fine floss and carbon if you want. You can easily remove carbon from the HOB if you need to med the tank, or add something special to the HOB when needed. That way you avoid opening the canister for changes. It works for me and I have three FOTs (I use a ton of biomedia in place of LR).
I would recommend a sump over a hob or canister, I have all three running on my big fowlr and now only have sumps ( 3 total sumps running a big tank)
 
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If you want an aquarium that would last for years I would slow down and do a lot more research. Figure out what you want to end up with and I think you (or anybody) will be more likely to do the work to keep it going. If what you want is a reef, than plan a reef tank. Stocking of fish, inverts and corals should take place slowly over weeks or months or years so it doesn’t matter if a particular invert is in stock at this moment. You’ve also listed off a lot of fish that will outgrow a 40 breeder so since you want this tank to last for years I’d look at build threads and full tank shots. See which tanks look good to you. Look at their stocking lists and then research what the fish in question needs. LiveAquaria has good size guidelines. If you find threads about a fish on a forum and most people are saying don’t do it and one or two are saying it’s fine, listen to the crowd (or at least find out a lot more from those saying it’s fine. How long have they had the fish? Is the fish mature (so territorial)? How long has the fish lived with its current tankmates etc)

finally, you can add equipment down the line. I would watch BRS 52 weeks of reefing as well as their other videos to understand why various pieces of equipment are used. Then you can decide if you need them for your system. You definitely won’t need everything.
I love BRS and I do watch their videos and I am researching hard but stocking is a bit hard because I am in literally the worst country for inverts (Australia)
 
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I would recommend a sump over a hob or canister, I have all three running on my big fowlr and now only have sumps ( 3 total sumps running a big tank)
I cannot run a sump because I have a filled tank and I cannot drain it for various reasons but I do agree a sump is better and any no Flood way I can get a sump I would do.
 
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I love BRS and I do watch their videos and I am researching hard but stocking is a bit hard because I am in literally the worst country for inverts (Australia)
We do not even have brittle or serpent stars which annoys me
 
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If you want an aquarium that would last for years I would slow down and do a lot more research. Figure out what you want to end up with and I think you (or anybody) will be more likely to do the work to keep it going. If what you want is a reef, than plan a reef tank. Stocking of fish, inverts and corals should take place slowly over weeks or months or years so it doesn’t matter if a particular invert is in stock at this moment. You’ve also listed off a lot of fish that will outgrow a 40 breeder so since you want this tank to last for years I’d look at build threads and full tank shots. See which tanks look good to you. Look at their stocking lists and then research what the fish in question needs. LiveAquaria has good size guidelines. If you find threads about a fish on a forum and most people are saying don’t do it and one or two are saying it’s fine, listen to the crowd (or at least find out a lot more from those saying it’s fine. How long have they had the fish? Is the fish mature (so territorial)? How long has the fish lived with its current tankmates etc)

finally, you can add equipment down the line. I would watch BRS 52 weeks of reefing as well as their other videos to understand why various pieces of equipment are used. Then you can decide if you need them for your system. You definitely won’t need everything.
Also, what fish do you recommend? I want a mix of nocturnal and diurnal fish.
 

Devaji

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my 2 cents....

I humbly suggest you slow down a take a few long slow deep breaths....

in....

out...

again...this time slower and longer....


repeat....
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ahhh mush better right!?

there no need to rush in. take some time to figure out what you want it's a big dissension. both types of tanks are nice and have there place.

firstly i would set down and figure out your budget...yes I know it sucks, but it will give you a better idea of your build cost and monthly running cost . not gonna lie reefing ant cheap. yes you can do it on a budget I make well under 20K USD and I do it. you just need to know your numbers and personal exceptions for the tank.

next i would spend some time a week or three looking at fish and corals to try to figure out if your a fish man ot coral guy. both are beautiful and have there place for sure!
as you know there are some cool non reef safe fish out there, but some amazing corals at the same time. that is why I hope to have both in the next year or so.

IMHO if you are thinking of a flower I would go way bigger that a 40. can save on the lighting and dosing, and put that money in to a larger tank. i would go 150+ alot of the cool non ref safe fish get big. a 180 is a nice starting FOWLR size! but you need to think about this, do you have space for a bigger tank? if so i would think about it. ( ppl upgrade and leave the hobby all the time if you are in no rush one can score some pretty good deals on used tanks. even complete systems.) if not then I say do a 40 reef and start out slow and do the fish 1st for 3-6 months then slowly add corals.

if you do go FOWLR like said a good scape really makes it look good. also keeping it nice and clean it goes a long way. I think one of the reasons FOWLR get poo pooed on it alot are there sometimes full of alage and dirty as the fish eat alot and they did not use proper filtration and husbandry methods.

so in the end we can only guide you but it is YOU who must decide what you like, what you can afford, what you have room for & what you have time/energy for etc.

I know its a hard choose. i what so many tanks but I have to limit what i have as well.
there are so many options of what to do with tanks out there again I would look around and see what you fancy.

Best of luck!
 

Fishbird

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Also, what fish do you recommend? I want a mix of nocturnal and diurnal fish.
I can’t plan a tank for you from scratch. But here’s what I did, and here’s what I think you should do.

1) Understand why people use various pieces of equipment.

2) Figure out what you can spend.

3) Figure out what you want to be looking at every day (Fowlr or reef). I haven’t read a single build thread where a tank ran for years with no challenges or bumps in the road. I have to assume that the most successful tanks are those that the aquarist is motivated to maintain.

4) Using the above information figure out if you’re going to start out planning for a reef or not.

5) What fish do you like? Make a list. Then go through your list and see how much space it needs based on territory needs, diet, and swimming style.

6) Based on the size of your tank, which you have already decided based on budget, which fish can you fit? Lots of people here can help you if you ask about specific combos. Also here, is the fish in question reef-safe? If you love it but it eats corals and you want a reef, would you rather give up the coral or the fish?

7) Do step 6 but for inverts.

8) Start squiring tank and other components. Continue double checking your fish and invert lists to make sure they are all compatible *and* that you can provide them with enough space in your tank.

9) When you do start getting fish add them slowly. If your tank is small, 1 every two or three weeks. Be prepared for your tank to evolve over the months and years.
 
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I can’t plan a tank for you from scratch. But here’s what I did, and here’s what I think you should do.

1) Understand why people use various pieces of equipment.

2) Figure out what you can spend.

3) Figure out what you want to be looking at every day (Fowlr or reef). I haven’t read a single build thread where a tank ran for years with no challenges or bumps in the road. I have to assume that the most successful tanks are those that the aquarist is motivated to maintain.

4) Using the above information figure out if you’re going to start out planning for a reef or not.

5) What fish do you like? Make a list. Then go through your list and see how much space it needs based on territory needs, diet, and swimming style.

6) Based on the size of your tank, which you have already decided based on budget, which fish can you fit? Lots of people here can help you if you ask about specific combos. Also here, is the fish in question reef-safe? If you love it but it eats corals and you want a reef, would you rather give up the coral or the fish?

7) Do step 6 but for inverts.

8) Start squiring tank and other components. Continue double checking your fish and invert lists to make sure they are all compatible *and* that you can provide them with enough space in your tank.

9) When you do start getting fish add them slowly. If your tank is small, 1 every two or three weeks. Be prepared for your tank to evolve over the months and years.
1- I want the essential equipment and also the very helpful ones.
2- Depends
3- I have planned a reef tank (I already have a anemone but my clownfish keep avoiding it) and I wouldn't mind challenges like a cyano outbreak or aptasia etc although I want my corals an anemones to live.
4-I am planning for my reef and my LFS is helping me.(They are a good store).
5- I planned on only have a pair of clownfish (which I already have - A.ocellaris) and maybe a yellow tang that I will swap out every year (Not final yet)
6- Well my two clownfish are good for a 40 and my LFS told me that I would be able to keep a yellow tang in my 40 until I would have to rehome it.
7- If I have only a pair of clowns I would plan to have 2 Fire shrimp (They look awesome and I do not care if they clean fish or eat detritus.) and a pincushion urchin ( I already have) and 3 Nassarius (I have one) and I do plan on feeding my mysis to the whole tank every second day so the shrimp eat and I might get a blue licktia star and I have done heavy research on him and my LFS store have kept some healthy for 4 months and they look fine ( No white patches or anything.)
8- Done - Snails take the sand, shrimp take the rockwork and sand, urchin takes whatever he is on (Rock,Glass,Sand,Heater,Filter etc.) Clownfish take the water (Hopefully the anemone) and corals on the rocks.
 
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I do not have anywhere to put the water but good explanation and is a reef octopus HOB protein skimmers good? Aquamaxx is sold out every here in Australia and will copepods die in the algae reacter? I have done slot of research and there's the YouTube's who say canisters are fine then the forum people who suggest sumps (Not everyone) so would a fx4 be sufficient?
I have a 75 gallon reef tank, using an fx4 for more water volume, more power and flow, and the ability to basically set it up as a casinister type of sump. I also run an AquaMaxx HOB 1.5, it's beautiful and amazing...just takes about a week for the microbubbles to subside.
IMG_20200523_184941.jpg
IMG_20200523_185348.jpg
 

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