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I am wondering if the torches spawned or if there is another mechanism of reproduction. Sort of reminds of a pocillopora where new corals start appearing.

There are three new torches in the photo below that have been growing over the past 6 months plus. The color forms vary a bit. Most of them appear to have yellow polyps with a green mouth, but some of them have more orange polyps. Nice varieties, but as they grow getting close to some of the acros and I may need to remove from the rock. Not sure the best way to do this without damaging the tiny torch skeletons. Wire saw, bone cutter, maybe a scalpel to the base since the skeleton is so thin?
BW5A3401.jpg
BW5A3393.jpg



Just found this one, which is tiny, measuring perhaps 3-4 mm in diameter at most. There are a couple others even smaller than this and the reason I'm questioning if the torches are spawning or if there is a different form of reproduction. I suppose this is a good problem to have.
BW5A3445.jpg



Here's a quick video of the tank from this morning

 
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ryanrick

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I am wondering if the torches spawned or if there is another mechanism of reproduction. Sort of reminds of a pocillopora where new corals start appearing.

There are three new torches in the photo below that have been growing over the past 6 months plus. The color forms vary a bit. Most of them appear to have yellow polyps with a green mouth, but some of them have more orange polyps. Nice varieties, but as they grow getting close to some of the acros and I may need to remove from the rock. Not sure the best way to do this without damaging the tiny torch skeletons. Wire saw, bone cutter, maybe a scalpel to the base since the skeleton is so thin?
BW5A3401.jpg
BW5A3393.jpg



Just found this one, which is tiny, measuring perhaps 3-4 mm in diameter at most. There are a couple others even smaller than this and the reason I'm questioning if the torches are spawning or if there is a different form of reproduction. I suppose this is a good problem to have.
BW5A3445.jpg



Here's a quick video of the tank from this morning

What a fun surprise! How many baby torches have you spotted?
 
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What a fun surprise! How many baby torches have you spotted?

There are about a dozen that I'm aware of currently. Varying sizes. I initially noticed something fluorescing on top of the rock work last August.

I had posted on the ID thread as initially wasn't sure what I was looking at.


Over time, I have had a few others that subsequently didn't make it, but the majority have grown well, and interesting that new tiny ones continue to periodically appear.
 
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There are about a dozen that I'm aware of currently. Varying sizes. I initially noticed something fluorescing on top of the rock work last August.

I had posted on the ID thread as initially wasn't sure what I was looking at.


Over time, I have had a few others that subsequently didn't make it, but the majority have grown well, and interesting that new tiny ones continue to periodically appear.
Good thing you didn't zap it! Area each of them different color morphs?
 
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Good thing you didn't zap it! Area each of them different color morphs?

They all have a green mouth. Most of them have yellow/gold polyps with some green in them. A couple of them have more orange toned polyps.

One of the larger ones is stinging the tip of of one of the adjacent acros. It's large enough I'm tempted to cut it off the rock, but I may just cut a frag off the acro and give the torch's skeleton more time to grow. Although eventually I'll need to relocate it, the chances of injuring it in the process will go down as it gets larger.
 
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WT TDF (Halides)
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WT TDF (Top down, actinics)

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RRC Splice
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BC Aquatic Man Table
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BC Gilded Lily
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Absolutely stellar photos!!!
 

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I am wondering if the torches spawned or if there is another mechanism of reproduction. Sort of reminds of a pocillopora where new corals start appearing.

There are three new torches in the photo below that have been growing over the past 6 months plus. The color forms vary a bit. Most of them appear to have yellow polyps with a green mouth, but some of them have more orange polyps. Nice varieties, but as they grow getting close to some of the acros and I may need to remove from the rock. Not sure the best way to do this without damaging the tiny torch skeletons. Wire saw, bone cutter, maybe a scalpel to the base since the skeleton is so thin?
BW5A3401.jpg
BW5A3393.jpg



Just found this one, which is tiny, measuring perhaps 3-4 mm in diameter at most. There are a couple others even smaller than this and the reason I'm questioning if the torches are spawning or if there is a different form of reproduction. I suppose this is a good problem to have.
BW5A3445.jpg



Here's a quick video of the tank from this morning

Once again, your system is so amazing you spawned euphyllia. That is incredible. I think you should wait a bit before attempting to remove the babies. They will have better survivability. I think a dental pick or exacto knife would pop the skeleton off the rock with no problem. Glue those bad boys to a plug and let them grow on a rack on the back wall.

Not only will they be worth some good money as "mariculture spawned", but who knows what cool color morphs you might get and want to keep. Plus, by documenting this, it could be a huge scientific step for our community. A cheap camera with infrared could record you tank at night and you could see if more coral or fish are Spawning.
 
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Once again, your system is so amazing you spawned euphyllia. That is incredible. I think you should wait a bit before attempting to remove the babies. They will have better survivability. I think a dental pick or exacto knife would pop the skeleton off the rock with no problem. Glue those bad boys to a plug and let them grow on a rack on the back wall.

Not only will they be worth some good money as "mariculture spawned", but who knows what cool color morphs you might get and want to keep. Plus, by documenting this, it could be a huge scientific step for our community. A cheap camera with infrared could record you tank at night and you could see if more coral or fish are Spawning.

When I spent some time taking some top down photos recently, I realized there are a lot of baby torch corals of varying sizes. Probably around 20 of them in various locations. It reminded of me of a pocillopora since the babies have come at different times and just seem to keep popping up.

I started looking into it and Euphyllia glabrescens is a brooding coral. I don't believe they broadcast spawn.
D7CF0E75-1C44-42E8-BBA7-DE6A4F682FA1_1_105_c.jpeg



This article describes them and hermaphroditic brooding corals. Interestingly notes different forms of zooxanthellae acquisition. Not sure if that accounts for the different color morphs of the babies or if it simply the result of different gamete combos in the formation of the larva.


I'm attaching two papers I found. One discusses the timing of larval release in five brooding corals. Two of them are E. glabrescens AND Pocillopora damicronis. The second paper also discusses the timing of release of larva but is more specific to torches and included a couple of photos of the planulae inside the tentacles. I haven't seen this yet in my own torches, but didn't know to look for it.

It does seem that the planula are settling in the system consistently. I am curious if others have kept torches have had similar experiences.
 

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Operator Wrasse

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When I spent some time taking some top down photos recently, I realized there are a lot of baby torch corals of varying sizes. Probably around 20 of them in various locations. It reminded of me of a pocillopora since the babies have come at different times and just seem to keep popping up.

I started looking into it and Euphyllia glabrescens is a brooding coral. I don't believe they broadcast spawn.
D7CF0E75-1C44-42E8-BBA7-DE6A4F682FA1_1_105_c.jpeg



This article describes them and hermaphroditic brooding corals. Interestingly notes different forms of zooxanthellae acquisition. Not sure if that accounts for the different color morphs of the babies or if it simply the result of different gamete combos in the formation of the larva.


I'm attaching two papers I found. One discusses the timing of larval release in five brooding corals. Two of them are E. glabrescens AND Pocillopora damicronis. The second paper also discusses the timing of release of larva but is more specific to torches and included a couple of photos of the planulae inside the tentacles. I haven't seen this yet in my own torches, but didn't know to look for it.

It does seem that the planula are settling in the system consistently. I am curious if others have kept torches have had similar experience
Awesome! I'll read those tonight. I'm finally delving into scientific articles as well, so if I see anything, I'll let you know.
 
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When I spent some time taking some top down photos recently, I realized there are a lot of baby torch corals of varying sizes. Probably around 20 of them in various locations. It reminded of me of a pocillopora since the babies have come at different times and just seem to keep popping up.

I started looking into it and Euphyllia glabrescens is a brooding coral. I don't believe they broadcast spawn.
D7CF0E75-1C44-42E8-BBA7-DE6A4F682FA1_1_105_c.jpeg



This article describes them and hermaphroditic brooding corals. Interestingly notes different forms of zooxanthellae acquisition. Not sure if that accounts for the different color morphs of the babies or if it simply the result of different gamete combos in the formation of the larva.


I'm attaching two papers I found. One discusses the timing of larval release in five brooding corals. Two of them are E. glabrescens AND Pocillopora damicronis. The second paper also discusses the timing of release of larva but is more specific to torches and included a couple of photos of the planulae inside the tentacles. I haven't seen this yet in my own torches, but didn't know to look for it.

It does seem that the planula are settling in the system consistently. I am curious if others have kept torches have had similar experiences.
Please let us know if you are able to see any planulae in the torches!
 
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18 months old. Overall system is doing well. Still working to adjust the nutrient export. Current nitrates 20, phosphates 0.15. I was dealing with aptasia, but the copperband has taken care of that.

The corals are growing. The LPS are generally doing well. I tried moving one of the goniopora and it didn't like the new location, moved it back and slowly polyps are re-extending. Acros are growing. I had a strange loss of part of the ORA frog skin. It developed an infection in the center of the colony. Tips and base were fine. I removed and dipped the colony and the dip was clean. I fragged and excised the area of tissue loss, and will work to regrow the colony. All the other acropora are doing well.

Fish are all doing well. Janss is handling the flow without any problems. Nine purple queens (pascalus anthias) continue doing well. Social structure remains stable. One dominant male with six females swim out in the flow most of the day. Two subdominant males are in the periphery. I'll be adding some tangs in the next month.

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Johnson wrasse's starting to flash in the evenings and colors are deepening. The pair are eating well and visibly growing. Hopefully in a couple months will be able to safely transition to the display.
BW5A3588-4.jpg
 
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How is the light spill with the Giesmann Spectra 72"? I'd like to be able to sit on my couch in front of the tank and not be blasted by my lighting.

Light spill or just nuisance lighting will depend on the distance of the fixture from the top of the tank, seating height, viewing distance, and width of the tank to a degree.

In my case, the stand is 36" tall, the tank is 27" in height, and the fixture is 11" from the water surface. I snapped this photo for you right now from a 16" seating height , 10' away from the tank in order to give you an idea.

As you can see, the halides are visible. In my case, I don't consider the light spill to be an issue. If it were, I could lower the fixture or look for an alternative solution. The tank could handle the bump in PAR, but heat would be an additional issue that I would need to keep an eye on.

Any light source, can give you light spill. So it is a potential issue with this fixture as with any other.

IMG_2965.jpeg
 
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Tank is doing well, but an update on my highlighter tabling acro.

Having reached over 8" in all dimensions after five years my the colony had started to trap detritus in between the corallites.

BE9204D6-B90C-4E05-9E5F-583AE8DF3BD6_1_105_c.jpeg


I moved it to an area with higher flow. Despite this, some areas between the corallites had already been damaged by the accumulation of detritus and a small amount of algae was growing in the area. I was optimistic that with the higher flow the coral would heal and was routinely careful to monitor the coral to ensure to no further detritus as well as manual removal of the algae.

Wednesday evening when I arrived home from work, I noted an area of the coral was necrosing due to a presumed bacterial infection.

IMG_2966.jpeg


I decided I would need to follow @ScottB 's experience and frag the coral. This coral is very thick though, and it would require a band saw which I don't have. I coordinated with a friend to come over the following afternoon to frag the coral.

Thursday morning the infection had spread rapidly. I fragged some of the tips of the coral that I was able to cut with bone cutters. I attempted to cut the colony, but it was too thick, and I considered a chisel and hammer, but decided to wait for the saw a little later in the day.
IMG_2968.jpeg


By Thursday afternoon, more than half the coral was dead. Looking under the coral, the tissue was receding off of even more of the coral.

IMG_2970.jpeg


Yesterday afternoon, we cut the coral with what grossly appeared to be a good margin of healthy tissue. Unfortunately, this morning the cut segments were dead.

43ADF4C6-1F50-49CA-B217-A8361B9E0C11_1_105_c.jpeg


The frags that I cut prior to getting access to the saw remain alive and so all isn't lost and I will get the chance to grow out this coral again.
 
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ryanrick

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Tank is doing well, but an update on my highlighter tabling acro.

Having reached over 8" in all dimensions after five years my the colony had started to trap detritus in between the corallites.

BE9204D6-B90C-4E05-9E5F-583AE8DF3BD6_1_105_c.jpeg


I moved it to an area with higher flow. Despite this, some areas between the corallites had already been damaged by the accumulation of detritus and a small amount of algae was growing in the area. I was optimistic that with the higher flow the coral would heal and was routinely careful to monitor the coral to ensure to no further detritus as well as manual removal of the algae.

Wednesday evening when I arrived home from work, I noted an area of the coral was necrosing due to a presumed bacterial infection.

IMG_2966.jpeg


I decided I would need to follow @ScottB 's experience and frag the coral. This coral is very thick though, and it would require a band saw which I don't have. I coordinated with a friend to come over the following afternoon to frag the coral.

Thursday morning the infection had spread rapidly. I fragged some of the tips of the coral that I was able to cut with bone cutters. I attempted to cut the colony, but it was too thick, and I considered a chisel and hammer, but decided to wait for the saw a little later in the day.
IMG_2968.jpeg


By Thursday afternoon, more than half the coral was dead. Looking under the coral, the tissue was receding off of even more of the coral.

IMG_2970.jpeg


Yesterday afternoon, we cut the coral with what grossly appeared to be a good margin of healthy tissue. Unfortunately, this morning the cut segments were dead.

43ADF4C6-1F50-49CA-B217-A8361B9E0C11_1_105_c.jpeg


The frags that I cut prior to getting access to the saw remain alive and so all isn't lost and I will get the chance to grow out this coral again.
Dang, that was one of the more epic corals I've seen in a tank. I look forward to seeing it grow back in!
 
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On a more positive note, some fish additions this week.

A captive bred yellow tang from Biota. I have never seen a yellow tang this small. I may place him in the other tank with the johnsoni wrasse to get bigger. I'm a little surprised at how small Biota ships these out. Sort of wish they would wait until they grow just a little bigger. This guy is in an acclimation box and hasn't eaten yet, but still getting settled.

49C913BD-F2B2-47C1-A6AC-4C66C79475EB_1_105_c.jpeg



One of the final fish additions, an acanthurus tang. My wife and daughter's got to decide the species and went with a lineatus. Ate some frozen today and was QT'd.
216CDB93-A427-4B6C-A232-B457DC78EE3A_1_105_c.jpeg



Final addition is a multi banded pipefish. Similar to the Janns, no difficulty with the flow. Swims in the water column, and highly visible with beautiful coloration.

This is a healthy specimen and has been actively hunting along the back of the glass and picking all day. Has acclimated to the system well and faster than expected.

F3E7369A-5CBB-4784-A565-D85B516E277C_1_105_c.jpeg
 

How many different food items do you feed your fish?

  • Only one food

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  • 3 Foods

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    Votes: 53 14.5%
  • 5+ Different Foods

    Votes: 131 35.8%
  • 10+ Different Foods

    Votes: 38 10.4%
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