Seeking plumbing strategies for a peninsula build...

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Dom

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Good morning,

So I've ordered a 125 gallon Aqueon tank whose dimensions are 72" x 18" x 22" high. This is for a new peninsula build. Please be patient as I am trying to paint a picture with words.

This will be my first peninsula build, and I'm wondering...

Typically, any builds I have completed have always been where the tank is set up in a "landscape" orientation with the overflow on one side and the return on the other. More specifically, my flow has always been clockwise, where the overflow is on the right and the return on the left.

Accordingly, my sump is built so that my drain flows into the first chamber on the right side of the sump, travels through the different chambers and finally into the return chamber on the left and back to the tank.

But in a peninsula build, the overflow and returns are on the same side.

My plan is to put to use a 33 Long sump that currently sits on a shelf. Taking into consideration that the sump is set up with a right to left flow, does this mean that I have to have my drain lines run the length of the stand to the first sump section? Or am I going to have to build a new sump with a different layout?

I hope I've made my question clear. If not I'm sorry, so please ask questions for clarification.

Thank you,
Dom
 
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stovenut

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Yes. You do not need to adjust anything in your sump. You will need your overflow drain lines to run a longer (mostly horizontal) distance in your stand to your filter socks. That is what I did and it actually makes for less splash and noise.
 

jmatt

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So, the question is is it better to have the drain run across the length of the sump and into the sock area, or to have the return lines do so. I would think that the drain should just come straight down and into the sump with the return lines being plumbed back across and up.

But I will find myself in the same position soon and am interested in the answer.
 

New&no clue

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I could be wrong here; not a plumbing expert, but I think it is better to have the return section as close as possible to reduce the loss of GPH. If the return is further away and has to horizontally run the length of the sump and then vertical up to the tank, the flow reduction will be greater than if it just has to do the vertical up portion. I have a peninsula tank, but my sump is in the basement. I have two sumps and the mess of plumbing, so I don't have any experience with this, but just my two cents.
 

Timfish

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I would say the main consideration is to keep it as simple as possible and still have rdundancy if any one peice of equipment fails. As far as the running the drain line horzontally to one end of the sump or running the return lines I prefer to keep drain lines as short as possible to reduce risk of clogging long term. But I've set systems up both ways also.
 
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Dom

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So, the question is is it better to have the drain run across the length of the sump and into the sock area, or to have the return lines do so. I would think that the drain should just come straight down and into the sump with the return lines being plumbed back across and up.

But I will find myself in the same position soon and am interested in the answer.

Actually, just the opposite. I feel the best is to have the run from your return pump to the tank to be the short run right up and in.

With return pumps, your GPH rating will be based on "head height". So as your he'd height increases, your GPH rating decreases. Now add all the pipe length across the stand along with the turns wishing the plumbing and you reduce your GPH rating even more.

No, better to have your drain line run the distance I would think.
 

jmatt

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Actually, just the opposite. I feel the best is to have the run from your return pump to the tank to be the short run right up and in.

With return pumps, your GPH rating will be based on "head height". So as your he'd height increases, your GPH rating decreases. Now add all the pipe length across the stand along with the turns wishing the plumbing and you reduce your GPH rating even more.

No, better to have your drain line run the distance I would think.
I'm a noob just getting back in, so I really can't say. But my thinking was that the drain can get clogged with a snail or something, but the return line can't. With that in mind, you'd want the drain line to be short and simple and easily cleaned.

But I get what you're saying about having to push the return water further. Interested in hearing more of the discussion since I'll be in the same boat in a month.
 

homer1475

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I would run the return in the long runs, and the drains as a straight shot. With long runs in the drain lines, it will be harder to purge the air from a siphon.

I don't think either way is wrong, just what ever way you choose to plumb it.
 
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Dom

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I'm a noob just getting back in, so I really can't say. But my thinking was that the drain can get clogged with a snail or something, but the return line can't. With that in mind, you'd want the drain line to be short and simple and easily cleaned.

I guess both sides have its merits.

I'm thinking the answer may be to have the filter chamber and return chamber on the same side. Red Sea does it this way in their peninsula systems.
 
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Dom

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Just took a look... I didn't know these were on the market: A sump designed for a peninsula tank with the drain and return both on the same end. I'll have to see if other vendors do something similar.


Yep... that's the video I saw.
 

Soren

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I guess both sides have its merits.

I'm thinking the answer may be to have the filter chamber and return chamber on the same side. Red Sea does it this way in their peninsula systems.
I was just thinking about something like this, if I understand correctly:
You could add baffles in the sump to make flow circular (primary divider in the middle) to make flow through the sump in a U-shape to keep the drains and return pumps on the same side of the sump.

It might be hard with a 33 long tank, though, which may not allow for a lot of room to reroute flow into a U in the sump.
 
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Dom

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I was just thinking about something like this, if I understand correctly:
You could add baffles in the sump to make flow circular (primary divider in the middle) to make flow through the sump in a U-shape to keep the drains and return pumps on the same side of the sump.

It might be hard with a 33 long tank, though, which may not allow for a lot of room to reroute flow into a U in the sump.

Yes... Red Sea builds sumps for their peninsula systems where the water flow is in a "U", with a baffle running down the long axis in the middle of the sump. With a 12" width, that makes for a narrow chamber.

I probably wouldn't redo the 33 long. I'd leave it on the shelf and build something new.
 

Soren

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Yes... Red Sea builds sumps for their peninsula systems where the water flow is in a "U", with a baffle running down the long axis in the middle of the sump. With a 12" width, that makes for a narrow chamber.
Agreed, I think you would need a much larger (at least wider) sump to make it work well in a U.

Assuming opposite ends in typical sump fashion:
If you run long drains to keep the returns shorter to limit head pressure losses, it seems best to run at a slight downward slope rather than horizontal to avoid flow/air bubble issues.
 
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