Shopping for First Marine Tank Red Sea? All In One?

Discussion in 'New to Saltwater & Reef Aquariums? Post Here' started by Salty John, Nov 10, 2017.

  1. Salty John

    Salty John Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Chorley, Lancashire, UK
    Hi all, can I just say what an excellent forum and source of information/guidance we have at our finger tips here!

    I have kept tropical fish a decade or so back and I found that quite simple to maintain. Because it is!

    I have always wanted a salt water reef aquarium so before I go for the large display tank in the living room, I am going to go for a smaller tank (possibly a nano) in the office to cut my teeth on.

    I have so far looked at the Red Sea MAX Nano and the Red Sea E-Series (max E 170 or 260). All going well, I would go for a 260 size tank.

    I like the style of these tanks and I also like the stands.

    The main questions really, would you guys recommend these tanks? Are there better, comparable tanks on the market? Would you suggest I go for the 'all in one' set up as supplied out of the box by Red Sea? Or should I go for the stand, tank and sump and just kit out the rest myself as I'm likely to want to upgrade the stock stuff any how?

    Thanks
     

  2. jt17

    jt17 Well-Known Member Partner Member 2018

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2012
    Messages:
    1,128
    Likes Received:
    111
    Location:
    Winter Haven, FL
    Welcome to REEF2REEF.
    If I we're to buy an all n one it would be redvsea. They are one of the best plug and play systems, IMO.
    That said, if you plan on upgrading components then I would recommend you go custom and buy all the individual components. I've had an all in one system and custom and I prefer the options that custom offers. All in one systems can be limiting for space so you may not be able upsize your skimmer or add an algae turf scrubber should you want in the future.
    Also important to note, smaller salt water systems are more difficult to maintain stability than larger volumes of water. If you are just keeping fish then that's not as much of an issue, but if you wish to also keep corals then stability is a key factor and I would recommend the largest tank you can fit/afford. I will warn you that collecting and growing corals can be addicting.
     
  3. Palyzoa

    Palyzoa Well-Known Member ETRC Member Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

    Joined:
    May 25, 2017
    Messages:
    348
    Likes Received:
    382
    I agree with above post. If you are already planning on upgrading, I would go as big as you can right off the bat ;). As for all in one tank vs tanks with sumps, I started with an AIO nano tank and it gets crowded quick once you start adding equipment like skimmers and media reactors. If I did it all over again I would go with a sump tank to begin with.
     
  4. Mikedawg

    Mikedawg Well-Known Member R2R Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2016
    Messages:
    486
    Likes Received:
    473
    Location:
    Atlanta
    I just bought the RedSea Max E 260 and really like it. As you know it is an AIO tank and has an option package for adding a RedSea sump later on if your requirements change; in that case you would need to buy another protein skimmer. Still, the versatility of this tank has appeal.

    Good luck with your choice.
     
    Palyzoa likes this.
  5. Susan Edwards

    Susan Edwards Well-Known Member R2R Supporter Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2016
    Messages:
    861
    Likes Received:
    471
    Location:
    California, United States
    I have the red sea max c250 for a first tank. I figured 66 gal was big enough to learn yet not too small to outgrow too fast. I liked not having to research and buy separate componets. No regrets. Except I want bigger.... I don't think you can go wrong with RS AIO
     
  6. Salty John

    Salty John Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Chorley, Lancashire, UK
    Hey, thanks for the replies folks.

    I think I've mislead some of you when I've mention AIO tank setups. I don't mean the one's where the display tank is all there is, and the filtration kit etc is all at the back in a little box.. I meant the AIO tanks with stand with sump and the kit that goes in the sump that is supplied by Red Sea straight out the box..

    Would I be better just getting the tank/stand/sump and buying the gear to run the tank separately as there are better things out there compared to the stock stuff that Red Sea would provide?

    Thanks
     
  7. Susan Edwards

    Susan Edwards Well-Known Member R2R Supporter Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2016
    Messages:
    861
    Likes Received:
    471
    Location:
    California, United States
    Typically, AIO is usually the plug and play type tanks with everything included except maybe the ATO . Even the larger red seas that come with sumps might not come with everything like skimmers or return pumps. Example the RS Reefer doesn't include anything but sump and ATO. You have to purchase your return pump and skimmer, so I'm not sure they are considered AIO's. I could be wrong--just my impression.

    I think it depends on you, your time to research, and your budget. For me, the advantage of having everything "decided for me" was I was new to saltwater. Like you, I'd done fresh water tanks. Saltwater is a whole different ball of wax! There is so much to learn, that not having to worry about adding anything but a top off and more flow was worth it to me, especially trying to set up the plumbing.

    It also depends on the size tank you're setting up to do. A larger tank, say over 50-66 gal (mine is 66) you'll typically have the sump below. A lot of smaller tanks offer the AIO's that are nice in that they are plug and play and good for first timers or limited space. Also, I believe over time, you can upgrade your RS equipment, esp. if it has the below sumps. Go with your comfort level and enjoy the journey
     
    jt17 likes this.
  8. Broadfield

    Broadfield Red Sea Reefer Consultant... Non Affiliated R2R Supporter R2R Excellence Award Reef Spotlight Award Reef Squad Photo of the Month Award Build Thread Contributor Partner Member 2018

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2014
    Messages:
    2,172
    Likes Received:
    3,172
    Location:
    Normal, IL
    Yeah, it doesn't sound like you actually want an AIO one tank... even though the Max Nano, Max E-170 etc are AIO tanks. AIO in the reef world means that the sump and tank are an all-in-one unit. So the tank is divided off in the back to form a sump. AIO doesn't necessarily mean that lights, pumps etc are included. However, the Max E series can be converted away from an AIO and you add the Red Sea sump and piping kit. But that's just more money in the end.

    So here's the breakdown on the Red Sea tanks that you are most likely interested in:
    • Max Nano: true AIO
    • Max E-Series: comes as a true AIO, but can be converted to a separate sump setup
    • Reefer series: true "reef ready" tank that includes a stand, sump and overflow plumbing. It has a bonus gravity fed ATO, but most ditch it.

    Judging by your comments, I think you would be leaning towards the Reefer series... specifically the Reefer 170.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
  9. johnnyk731

    johnnyk731 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2017
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    28
    Plus 1 to broadfields thoughts get a reefer any size you will love it!
     
  10. Salty John

    Salty John Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Chorley, Lancashire, UK
    I certainly do like the look of those Reefer tanks. I will have a closer look.

    thanks guys
     
Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page

Loading...