Should I build a stand riser so I can access spillage? (Drawing inside!)

SharkRacer

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I have a very tight shelf I will be using for my tank (I know I know it's less than ideal, but it's what have to work with).

Screen Shot 2022-01-28 at 9.54.22 AM.png


I received a lot of wonderful advice that this is a tough spot for any spills, which I agree with.

Would it make sense for me to build a small platform for the tank to sit on? Or are there any other options that would work?

Maybe just a 2x4 frame, constructed in a way that gave me just a couple of inches of airflow underneath the tank (and the ability to reach in there with a towel or sponge to clean up any spills?

This may also spread the weight load over a bit more surface area (and that center piece would align perfectly with the primary center support in the shelf.

* I realize I forgot to draw in a centerpiece directly over the existing one in the image to give support to the center of the tank, I would add that as well)

Screen Shot 2022-01-28 at 9.07.26 AM.png


Screen Shot 2022-01-28 at 9.07.26 AM.png
 
REEFTIDE

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What is the material under the tank? If it is wood or another surface that could be damaged by saltwater than I might go for something like that, however if it is stone or some sort of plastic ( what it looks like in the picture ) then I wouldn't be to worried about it.

Curious to see what others think.
 

Dburr1014

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Absolutely that would work. Plastic would be best. Instead of long planks front to back you can do pucks instead. It would be less of a footprint for water to get trapped. Less water =less damage =less time to dry, if something does happen. And rising it you can get Paper towels or whatever to help soak up water.
 
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SharkRacer

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What is the material under the tank? If it is wood or another surface that could be damaged by saltwater than I might go for something like that, however if it is stone or some sort of plastic ( what it looks like in the picture ) then I wouldn't be to worried about it.

Curious to see what others think.
It's kitchen countertop material (waterproof) butted up against drywall (not waterproof). I was thinking of painting the entire alcove with marine paint then running silicone around the edge to seal it.
 
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SharkRacer

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Absolutely that would work. Plastic would be best. Instead of long planks front to back you can do pucks instead. It would be less of a footprint for water to get trapped. Less water =less damage =less time to dry, if something does happen. And rising it you can get Paper towels or whatever to help soak up water.
I love the idea of plastic "pucks" - Are you suggesting something like this?

 
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It's kitchen countertop material (waterproof) butted up against drywall (not waterproof). I was thinking of painting the entire alcove with marine paint then running silicone around the edge to seal it.
That is probably what I would go with! But it looks like others have great ideas pertaining to raising the tank too.
 

Dburr1014

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I love the idea of plastic "pucks" - Are you suggesting something like this?

I was thinking more plastic round or square blocks. They can be screwed or glued right to the frame you build. Put them every 12" (evenly spaced to whatever your tank size is) to support the weight evenly. If you have access to a lathe you can make them yourself. They just need to be all the same height.
 

HuduVudu

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Be very careful doing this. You will create pressure points on the aquarium and this isn't an ideal situation.

Latex paint on the drywall should be fine. I think the biggest thing that would help you is to get the cabinet out a couple inches from the wall so that you can use a cloth to clean and wipe down things.

Also I would put some sort of ridge (dam) on the back side of the cabinet space to insure the water pools on the cabinet and doesn't run down the back. A silicon bead might even be enough to accomplish this.
 

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