Should I get it over with and fallow my display? Need advice

sanzz18

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I probably said this before in another post, but biggest regret is not quarantining all my fish. I followed what a lot of old school people did near me and just drop fish in if they eat well at the store and do not appear to have anything/look good. They have always had very good luck with even difficult fish like achilles tangs for years without issues. That kind of luck isn’t in the majority’s favor.

At the moment, I have a new naso tang doing very, very well eating like crazy, but has a bunch of salt-looking particles on one of its sides. I don’t think it is velvet. Looks more like ich. I don’t if I should just manage this and hope for the best or fallow.

My livestock list: blue hippo tang, naso tang, achilles tang, squaretail bristletooth tang, two clowns, three disbar anthias, purple firefish, fox face, solar fairy wrasse, and a blue-side fairy wrasse.

I have a Waterbox 220.6 so catching some of these fish will be extremely difficult, but should I try to and go fallow for 76 days? And then quarantine all fish going forward.

I am going to try to get a few good pics of it.
 
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FOO-CAT

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For me hippo tangs and achilles have been magnets for ick. I would install a UV if you don't have one, supplement with some form of garlic, I use NLS Thera-A. Have you seen any aggression causing stress between the tangs?
 
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sanzz18

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For me hippo tangs and achilles have been magnets for ick. I would install a UV if you don't have one, supplement with some form of garlic, I use NLS Thera-A. Have you seen any aggression causing stress between the tangs?

I have a Aqua Ultraviolet 57watt on my tank currently for the last few months. There was tang aggression when first I added the naso and bristletooth for a day or two. That has since subsided completely.
 

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It is up to you. Just note that pretty much any fish you add afterwards is likely to get it and it may build overtime with more and more timelines appearing. I would personally remove the fish, but that is up to you. If I had no way of removing the fish, my last resort would be kick ich for at least 45 days in the display (at 81 degrees that is the minimum).


UV is not going to solve it and stress does not cause ich.
 
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sanzz18

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It is up to you. Just note that pretty much any fish you add afterwards is likely to get it and it may build overtime with more and more timelines appearing. I would personally remove the fish, but that is up to you. If I had no way of removing the fish, my last resort would be kick ich for at least 45 days in the display (at 81 degrees that is the minimum).


UV is not going to solve it and stress does not cause ich.
UV does help with reducing free floating parasites and organisms and stress does not cause it but it weakens the fish’s immune system and allows it to take over. I get that. This is just a huge decision to make and want as much feedback as possible.
 
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I probably said this before in another post, but biggest regret is not quarantining all my fish. I followed what a lot of old school people did near me and just drop fish in if they eat well at the store and do not appear to have anything/look good. They have always had very good luck with even difficult fish like achilles tangs for years without issues. That kind of luck isn’t in the majority’s favor.

At the moment, I have a new naso tang doing very, very well eating like crazy, but has a bunch of salt-looking particles on one of its sides. I don’t think it is velvet. Looks more like ich. I don’t if I should just manage this and hope for the best or fallow.

My livestock list: blue hippo tang, naso tang, achilles tang, squaretail bristletooth tang, two clowns, three disbar anthias, purple firefish, fox face, solar fairy wrasse, and a blue-side fairy wrasse.

I have a Waterbox 220.6 so catching some of these fish will be extremely difficult, but should I try to and go fallow for 76 days? And then quarantine all fish going forward.

I am going to try to get a few good pics of it.

Your answer entirely depends on whether you have the time and resources to set up and manage qt, especially for multiple tangs. If you do, then go ahead and treat them, and leave it fallow for 45 days at 82 degrees Fahrenheit. If you don’t, then management with UV, vitamin soaked food, stability, and minimized aggression will be your best bet. I imagine you would need a fairly large qt for all those fish. If you have an corals, you will need to dose, as you are removing a large source of nutrients. Good luck.
 

Spare time

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UV does help with reducing free floating parasites and organisms and stress does not cause it but it weakens the fish’s immune system and allows it to take over. I get that. This is just a huge decision to make and want as much feedback as possible.


I still am unconvinced that UV will cut it down significantly. I don't know where that idea comes from and most people seem to just hear it from another. It just seems like it would be miraculous for enough ich to hatch, somehow bypass the fish, get pulled into a rather slow water turnover UV, and then get to the fish. I do understand how it aids for bacterial and viral instances. And as for stress, I understand your point, but unless there is constant stress, I do not think it would be an issue. This kind of stress would be very obvious. It also is impossible to know stress levels in our fish with just our eyes alone (unless the fish is literally getting beat up constantly).

I want to point out that I am also a pessimist lol. It is hard to imagine the number of fish this hobby kills (catching, transporting, people misenformed, disease, etc.). Trapping fish in a small box with possibly never ending amounts of parasites, disease, etc is hard for a fish to just "tolerate" it as some would like to put it. That is why I am a fan of QT. If I am going to put a fish through "heck" to get to my tank, I am going to make sure this fish doesn't have to deal with even more crud than it needs to.

Now if a QT is just simply impractical for you, I understand. Setting up multiple tanks can be a pain and messy. In that case I would just give some of the reef safe options a try just for the heck of it.
 
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sanzz18

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Your answer entirely depends on whether you have the time and resources to set up and manage qt, especially for multiple tangs. If you do, then go ahead and treat them, and leave it fallow for 45 days at 82 degrees Fahrenheit. If you don’t, then management with UV, vitamin soaked food, stability, and minimized aggression will be your best bet. I imagine you would need a fairly large qt for all those fish. If you have an corals, you will need to dose, as you are removing a large source of nutrients. Good luck.
Time is more of a issue for me then resources. The biggest quarantine tank I can use for this is a 40g breeder due to space restraints of my basement plus the wife lol.
I still am unconvinced that UV will cut it down significantly. I don't know where that idea comes from and most people seem to just hear it from another. It just seems like it would be miraculous for enough ich to hatch, somehow bypass the fish, get pulled into a rather slow water turnover UV, and then get to the fish. I do understand how it aids for bacterial and viral instances. And as for stress, I understand your point, but unless there is constant stress, I do not think it would be an issue. This kind of stress would be very obvious. It also is impossible to know stress levels in our fish with just our eyes alone (unless the fish is literally getting beat up constantly).

I want to point out that I am also a pessimist lol. It is hard to imagine the number of fish this hobby kills (catching, transporting, people misenformed, disease, etc.). Trapping fish in a small box with possibly never ending amounts of parasites, disease, etc is hard for a fish to just "tolerate" it as some would like to put it. That is why I am a fan of QT. If I am going to put a fish through "heck" to get to my tank, I am going to make sure this fish doesn't have to deal with even more crud than it needs to.

Now if a QT is just simply impractical for you, I understand. Setting up multiple tanks can be a pain and messy. In that case I would just give some of the reef safe options a try just for the heck of it.
I totally hear what you are saying hence why I did not specifically say “ich” when speaking of how the UV sterilizer helps. My though process is rhat water quality is one of the most important aspects of this hobby. UV sterilizers definitely improves water quality, which improves overall stability, which reduces stress.

I hear you too by the way, I can be very pessimistic. I feel bad that we sacrifice these fish for our own personal enjoyment lol. I looked up quarantining vs not quarantining led me to post like those of @Paul B. I kind of wanted to stay the management method.

Quarantining would have been so much easier for me if I did it from the start, but now I would have to quarantine all fish at once. This led me to these crossroads.
 
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sanzz18

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Tried to get a still of the naso to have you guys look at the white marks. Video is the only way I can get it good.
 
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sanzz18

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IMG_0045.jpg

Was able to get a better still picture, in case the HD version of the video I attached doesn't load.
 

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It is up to you. Just note that pretty much any fish you add afterwards is likely to get it and it may build overtime with more and more timelines appearing. I would personally remove the fish, but that is up to you. If I had no way of removing the fish, my last resort would be kick ich for at least 45 days in the display (at 81 degrees that is the minimum).


UV is not going to solve it and stress does not cause ick
No stress doesn't cause it , but stress will trigger an outbreak. No, a UV won't solve it, but a UV will help.
 

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