Sick Clownfish.

Mimi9011

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I think it's brooklynella, but my local pet store says otherwise, but they don't know. I know brooklynella acts fast, but he's been like this for almost 3 days. He's eating, but not much anymore. He's defecating properly too. My major tells for brooklynella are the gasping and slime coat on the left fin. He's not lethargic, yet commonly swims low.
 
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Jay Hemdal

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I think it's brooklynella, but my local pet store says otherwise, but they don't know. I know brooklynella acts fast, but he's been like this for almost 3 days. He's eating, but not much anymore. He's defecating properly too. My major tells for brooklynella are the gasping and slime coat on the left fin. He's not lethargic, yet commonly swims low.
Hi , Welcome to Reef2Reef!

I can’t rule out Brooklynella, but the orange clown is being pretty dominant, and that may get worse when you leave the room.

How long have you had the fish?
Did you buy them together?
Have you treated them with anything?

Jay
 
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Mimi9011

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Hi , Welcome to Reef2Reef!

I can’t rule out Brooklynella, but the orange clown is being pretty dominant, and that may get worse when you leave the room.

How long have you had the fish?
Did you buy them together?
Have you treated them with anything?

Jay
Hi Jay,

I've had them for about 3 weeks now. I bought them together and orange is definitely more dominant. Black shakes in response usually, and according to my research, this means he's communicating about being submissive. Nonetheless, for feeding I try to separate them and make sure they both get their share. In terms of treatment, I've just been dosing their food with vitamin supplements. Everyone I've asked said they don't know what's going on, so no specific medication.
 

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Im thinking aggression more than anything. With Brook, at the onset, fish may scrape up against objects, rapid respiration develops, and fish often gasp for air at the surface as the gills become clogged with mucus. Very quickly the fish will become lethargic, refuse to eat, and its colors will fade. The most noticeable symptom of Brooklynella is the heavy amount of slime that is produced by a fish that has contracted this parasite. As the disease progresses, a thick whitish mucus covers the body. This will usually start at the head and spread outward across the entire body. Skin lesions appear and it is not uncommon for signs of secondary bacterial infections.
In your case and as pointed out by Jay H , female clownfish are much more dominant than their male counterparts. They greedily try to eat most of the food that gets into the tank (which is one reason the males don't grow as large). They will often aggressively protect their "home", whether that be an anenome, a nesting site, a clay pot or the entire fish tank.
 
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Mimi9011

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Hi , Welcome to Reef2Reef!

I can’t rule out Brooklynella, but the orange clown is being pretty dominant, and that may get worse when you leave the room.

How long have you had the fish?
Did you buy them together?
Have you treated them with anything?

Jay
Hi Jay,

I've had them for about 3 weeks now. I bought them together and orange is definitely more dominant. Black shakes in response usually, and according to my research, this means he's communicating about being submissive. Nonetheless, for feeding I try to separate them and make sure they both get the share. In terms of treatment, I've just been dosing their food with vitamin supplements. Everyone I've asked said they don't know what's going on, so no specific medication.
Im thinking aggression more than anything. With Brook, at the onset, fish may scrape up against objects, rapid respiration develops, and fish often gasp for air at the surface as the gills become clogged with mucus. Very quickly the fish will become lethargic, refuse to eat, and its colors will fade. The most noticeable symptom of Brooklynella is the heavy amount of slime that is produced by a fish that has contracted this parasite. As the disease progresses, a thick whitish mucus covers the body. This will usually start at the head and spread outward across the entire body. Skin lesions appear and it is not uncommon for signs of secondary bacterial infections.
In your case and as pointed out by Jay H , female clownfish are much more dominant than their male counterparts. They greedily try to eat most of the food that gets into the tank (which is one reason the males don't grow as large). They will often aggressively protect their "home", whether that be an anenome, a nesting site, a clay pot or the entire fish tank.

Im thinking aggression more than anything. With Brook, at the onset, fish may scrape up against objects, rapid respiration develops, and fish often gasp for air at the surface as the gills become clogged with mucus. Very quickly the fish will become lethargic, refuse to eat, and its colors will fade. The most noticeable symptom of Brooklynella is the heavy amount of slime that is produced by a fish that has contracted this parasite. As the disease progresses, a thick whitish mucus covers the body. This will usually start at the head and spread outward across the entire body. Skin lesions appear and it is not uncommon for signs of secondary bacterial infections.
In your case and as pointed out by Jay H , female clownfish are much more dominant than their male counterparts. They greedily try to eat most of the food that gets into the tank (which is one reason the males don't grow as large). They will often aggressively protect their "home", whether that be an anenome, a nesting site, a clay pot or the entire fish tank.
Hi,

So is this resulting in the mark on the left fin and the pale coat? And if so, what should I do? Should I separate them? And for how long? I've only have 1 tank, my other is 2 gal which I doubt will be suitable.
 
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Hi Jay,

I've had them for about 3 weeks now. I bought them together and orange is definitely more dominant. Black shakes in response usually, and according to my research, this means he's communicating about being submissive. Nonetheless, for feeding I try to separate them and make sure they both get the share. In terms of treatment, I've just been dosing their food with vitamin supplements. Everyone I've asked said they don't know what's going on, so no specific medication.



Hi,

So is this resulting in the mark on the left fin and the pale coat? And if so, what should I do? Should I separate them? And for how long? I've only have 1 tank, my other is 2 gal which I doubt will be suitable.
To feer temporary relief, you can give fish a freshwater dip usng the same temperature as display tank. Treatment of choice for brook is formalin in the form of either general cure in seperate container or bucket for 90 min bath adding aeration.
Other option is ruby Rally pro which is reef safe but will take longer to treat fish ( about 10 days)
 
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Mimi9011

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To feer temporary relief, you can give fish a freshwater dip usng the same temperature as display tank. Treatment of choice for brook is formalin in the form of either general cure in seperate container or bucket for 90 min bath adding aeration.
Other option is ruby Rally pro which is reef safe but will take longer to treat fish ( about 10 days)
I'll definitely do the fresh water dip. Formalin is unavailable in my country, but this is the first I've heard of ruby rally pro. I'll look into that
 
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