Some question about Wennerae Mantis Shrimp, from a Beginner.

Invadetor

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I asked some time ago about if the Peacock Mantis Shrimp would be a good decision for a beginner, but it seems like it's better to opt for a smaller species like the Wennerae... said that I have few question about this little dude, manly about how it acts:
1. Is a 20 Gallons Long Aquarium (If they exist) a good pick for an adult of this Specie?
2. Do they need big sand substrate? I heard they like to hide under the sand.
3. I know that any kind of Mantis Shrimp will do its best to kill anything that breathe inside its tank... but will they also kill corals, or can I learn to keep corals with the Mantis Shrimp?
4. What is the little guy Lifespan, and how do I know what age it has (obviously approximately)? I don't mind if it has a short Lifespan, especially because I want to keep Octopus (which only live 1 year at best).
5. Do they need live food? If yes what is their favorite?
6. What is Light schedule and Water Parameters for that specie of Mantis Shrimp? How many water changes and etc...
7. Best skimmer and filter for it?
8. This is a strange question, and I'm not sure if anyone can answer it... but if I keep the Mantis Shrimp aquarium somewhat near my Axolotls Tank (like 6 feet), will the Axolotls (or the Mantis Shrimp) get stressed or scared?
I think that was all of it.
If you can I would also really like to know how much will the tank full cost be (with also Live Rocks and Sand) without the corals, I know that even small Saltwater tanks can cost quite a bit, but I'm saving some money for it because I really want to get into Saltwater!
Bonus question: I found this site that sell exactly that species, and I would like to know if anyone has any Idea if they can be trusted, here the link: https://www.saltybottomreefcompany.com/wmantis.
Oh, and lastly do you think that if I manage to learn with the Mantis Shrimp I can also start keeping Eels and SeaHorses?

Anyway thank for da help!
 
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vetteguy53081

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Overall, it is smaller but similar care requirements which are fairly basic. . . .
Maintain good water quality
Salinity 1.025
Temp- 75-76
Calcium 440

foods:
Small pieces of shrimp
Krill
Snails
Small crabs
Bivalves
Clam
 
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Overall, it is smaller but similar care requirements which are fairly basic. . . .
Maintain good water quality
Salinity 1.025
Temp- 75-76
Calcium 440

foods:
Small pieces of shrimp
Krill
Snails
Small crabs
Bivalves
Clam
Oh I see... is a 20 gallons tank enough for a small Mantis Shrimp or does it need something bigger?
And about the light, I have to keep it open for around 6-8 hours a day, right?
Anyway thank for the help!
 

vetteguy53081

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Oh I see... is a 20 gallons tank enough for a small Mantis Shrimp or does it need something bigger?
And about the light, I have to keep it open for around 6-8 hours a day, right?
Anyway thank for the help!
20 will be sufficient and they’re not light dependent like coral.,
6-8 hours sufficient and if you work during the day, plug into a timer to come on an hour or so before you come home and enjoy your specimen
 

nmotz

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I asked some time ago about if the Peacock Mantis Shrimp would be a good decision for a beginner, but it seems like it's better to opt for a smaller species like the Wennerae... said that I have few question about this little dude, manly about how it acts:
1. Is a 20 Gallons Long Aquarium (If they exist) a good pick for an adult of this Specie?
2. Do they need big sand substrate? I heard they like to hide under the sand.
3. I know that any kind of Mantis Shrimp will do its best to kill anything that breathe inside its tank... but will they also kill corals, or can I learn to keep corals with the Mantis Shrimp?
4. What is the little guy Lifespan, and how do I know what age it has (obviously approximately)? I don't mind if it has a short Lifespan, especially because I want to keep Octopus (which only live 1 year at best).
5. Do they need live food? If yes what is their favorite?
6. What is Light schedule and Water Parameters for that specie of Mantis Shrimp? How many water changes and etc...
7. Best skimmer and filter for it?
8. This is a strange question, and I'm not sure if anyone can answer it... but if I keep the Mantis Shrimp aquarium somewhat near my Axolotls Tank (like 6 feet), will the Axolotls (or the Mantis Shrimp) get stressed or scared?
I think that was all of it.
If you can I would also really like to know how much will the tank full cost be (with also Live Rocks and Sand) without the corals, I know that even small Saltwater tanks can cost quite a bit, but I'm saving some money for it because I really want to get into Saltwater!
Bonus question: I found this site that sell exactly that species, and I would like to know if anyone has any Idea if they can be trusted, here the link: https://www.saltybottomreefcompany.com/wmantis.
Oh, and lastly do you think that if I manage to learn with the Mantis Shrimp I can also start keeping Eels and SeaHorses?

Anyway thank for da help!
20L is plenty of room. Recommend very porous live rock with 1” sand bed and he will burrow underneath a piece of rock. Corals are fine with a Wennerae. It will live a few years probably. Live food is best, small crabs/snails/live brine shrimp. Frozen or freeze dried krill is good. Light schedule not too important, recommend 10% water changes once per week. A skimmer isn’t too important for a small mantis, any HOB filter or canister filter will do. Grow some macroalgae to soak up nitrates. A small internal skimmer like the Tunze 9004 is overkill but would eliminate nitrates entirely. Cost varies based on equipment, but you’ll need a few hundred to get started, especially if you want coral (lights, special pumps, etc)
 
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nmotz

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You think a Wennerae will kill a fish ?
Unlikely, but not impossible. If you can tolerate losing the fish, put it in and see what happens. Your odds are decent, especially if the fish is slightly larger than the mantis. But I would not recommend high-end $$$ fish. If the fish is too large it might spook the mantis and you won’t see him very much.
 
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20L is plenty of room. Recommend very porous live rock with 1” sand bed and he will burrow underneath a piece of rock. Corals are fine with a Wennerae. It will live a few years probably. Live food is best, small crabs/snails/live brine shrimp. Frozen or freeze dried krill is good. Light schedule not too important, recommend 10% water changes once per week. A skimmer isn’t too important for a small mantis, any HOB filter or canister filter will do. Grow some macroalgae to soak up nitrates. A small internal skimmer like the Tunze 9004 is overkill but would eliminate nitrates entirely. Cost varies based on equipment, but you’ll need a few hundred to get started, especially if you want coral (lights, special pumps, etc)
Woah, thank for all the information!
Outside the Aquarium size, what would change if I decided to keep a Peacock Mantis Shrimp? Do I need to be careful for other stuff?
Anyway thank for the help!
 

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Woah, thank for all the information!
Outside the Aquarium size, what would change if I decided to keep a Peacock Mantis Shrimp? Do I need to be careful for other stuff?
Anyway thank for the help!
I have a juvenile Peacock in a 20L. The real issue is water quality in smaller tanks but for a full grown adult a 40B is a better size tank. You need a better “burrow” for a Peacock. A PVC pipe is highly recommended, and not just a small segment. A genuine U-shaped burrow at least 2-3 body lengths long and the diameter 1.5x the width of the animal (normally 1.5in for a juvenile and 2in or more for an adult). You can get the pipe from a hardware store, I recommend watching some Youtube examples. I coat my pipes with epoxy and dip them in a bucket with coral gravel to partially disguise the appearance of bare PVC. The important thing is to avoid what most people do: make a shallow, open cave and let the mantis just sit there mostly exposed. I’m that setup they’ll die of shell rot or a bad molt pretty quickly. The PVC pipe burrow requirement is probably the most significant difference between keeping a Peacock and any smaller mantis species. A skimmer is also recommended but you can have a Peacock without one if you keep nitrates down. Bottom line, nitrates need to stay under 10ppm, preferably under 5ppm. That can be hard with a full grown Peacock…unless you run a skimmer.
 
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I have a juvenile Peacock in a 20L. The real issue is water quality in smaller tanks but for a full grown adult a 40B is a better size tank. You need a better “burrow” for a Peacock. A PVC pipe is highly recommended, and not just a small segment. A genuine U-shaped burrow at least 2-3 body lengths long and the diameter 1.5x the width of the animal (normally 1.5in for a juvenile and 2in or more for an adult). You can get the pipe from a hardware store, I recommend watching some Youtube examples. I coat my pipes with epoxy and dip them in a bucket with coral gravel to partially disguise the appearance of bare PVC. The important thing is to avoid what most people do: make a shallow, open cave and let the mantis just sit there mostly exposed. I’m that setup they’ll die of shell rot or a bad molt pretty quickly. The PVC pipe burrow requirement is probably the most significant difference between keeping a Peacock and any smaller mantis species. A skimmer is also recommended but you can have a Peacock without one if you keep nitrates down. Bottom line, nitrates need to stay under 10ppm, preferably under 5ppm. That can be hard with a full grown Peacock…unless you run a skimmer.
Oh, I see, should I also worry about the light schedule? I know that the light might burn the skin of the Mantis Shrimp... and saw that A Peacock Mantis Shrimp is bigger than the other, can they live with Corals, or this is not a good idea?
Anyway thank for the help again, I really appreciate it!
 
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nmotz

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Oh, I see, should I also worry about the light schedule? I know that the light might burn the skin of the Mantis Shrimp... and saw that A Peacock Mantis Shrimp is bigger than the other, can they live with Corals, or this is not a good idea?
Anyway thank for the help again, I really appreciate it!
It’s possible to keep a Peacock in a high lighting tank but IME they seem less active under full spectrum lighting. Low watt T5 or turned down LEDs are better but of course that makes it harder to keep coral. High lighting does make shell rot more common but many have kept Peacocks under high lighting for at least a couple years with no real problem. The truth is all Peacocks will likely get shell rot eventually. They get it in the wild too. It’s just a matter of how well you treat it and how good the water quality is. Peacocks won’t really bother corals although some have moved them in front of their burrows as a way of disguising the entrance. I have always kept coral with Peacock mantis shrimp without any real problems.

Best recommendation i can offer is to learn how to maintain high water quality. If you can do that consistently then youll have a good chance with a Peacock. But it’s hard to be consistent. Even a high nitrate spike over 10ppm can initiate shell rot. Once there it can be treated but it’s not always effective.

Peacocks eat constantly so they tend to create more nitrates so high nutrient export is essential: WCs, protein skimmer, and macroalgae are all useful, so is running carbon for reducing pollutants which like to settle in the tank.
 
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It’s possible to keep a Peacock in a high lighting tank but IME they seem less active under full spectrum lighting. Low watt T5 or turned down LEDs are better but of course that makes it harder to keep coral. High lighting does make shell rot more common but many have kept Peacocks under high lighting for at least a couple years with no real problem. The truth is all Peacocks will likely get shell rot eventually. They get it in the wild too. It’s just a matter of how well you treat it and how good the water quality is. Peacocks won’t really bother corals although some have moved them in front of their burrows as a way of disguising the entrance. I have always kept coral with Peacock mantis shrimp without any real problems.

Best recommendation i can offer is to learn how to maintain high water quality. If you can do that consistently then youll have a good chance with a Peacock. But it’s hard to be consistent. Even a high nitrate spike over 10ppm can initiate shell rot. Once there it can be treated but it’s not always effective.

Peacocks eat constantly so they tend to create more nitrates so high nutrient export is essential: WCs, protein skimmer, and macroalgae are all useful, so is running carbon for reducing pollutants which like to settle in the tank.
Oh, so the biggest thing I should worry about is to keep water parameters stable, right?
To do this I need to cycle the tank, have a filter and a protein skimmer and do a 20% water change every week, or do I need to do something else too?
Anyway thank again ahah, you really helped me a bunch!
 

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I have a Wennerae in a 40g and he does just fine. Never killed a fish. One day I heard and saw him beating on a turbo but never busted his shell and I simply moved the turbo to the other side of the tank. Hermits don’t fair so well but there are still some in there.
I feed him every few days some clam, squid or shrimp with a feeding tong

If you want you can also build burrows using 1” PVC with a few bends and then conceal it with sand and rock, he will pull sand and burrow making it his own.

There’s multiple BTA’s, clowns, goby, blenny and couple of corals, there was also a hawkfish that didn’t bother each other.
 

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Oh, so the biggest thing I should worry about is to keep water parameters stable, right?
To do this I need to cycle the tank, have a filter and a protein skimmer and do a 20% water change every week, or do I need to do something else too?
Anyway thank again ahah, you really helped me a bunch!
After you cycle, regularly test the water to ensure nitrates are low. Then a 10-15% WC/week is enough but doing more won’t hurt. I would also recommend putting a small bag of activated carbon in your filter so make sure you get one big enough for that. It detoxifies the water of pollutants. Keeping a Peacock really isn’t too hard once you get comfortable with aquarium basics. Keep a small bottle of Seachen Prime in case your nitrates get out of control. It’ll detox the nitrates until you can do water changes to remove them. Saved me on a number of occasions!
 
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After you cycle, regularly test the water to ensure nitrates are low. Then a 10-15% WC/week is enough but doing more won’t hurt. I would also recommend putting a small bag of activated carbon in your filter so make sure you get one big enough for that. It detoxifies the water of pollutants. Keeping a Peacock really isn’t too hard once you get comfortable with aquarium basics. Keep a small bottle of Seachen Prime in case your nitrates get out of control. It’ll detox the nitrates until you can do water changes to remove them. Saved me on a number of occasions!
Alright, thank a lot for the help again! I'll save some money for both the tank and the Mantis Shrimp, and do my best!
 
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