STN-X and RTN-X Product Release

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RTN-X and STN-X

Slow Tissue Necrosis (STN) and Rapid Tissue Necrosis (RTN) are two common problems that have become increasingly prevalent in the modern reef aquarium with the growing popularity of small polyp stony coral (SPS) dominated systems. Although this issue can result from parasitic infestation, primary or secondary bacterial infection is another cause of tissue necrosis in our corals.

RTN-X and STN-X were derived through TRITON’s unique scientific work in N-DOC lab testing establishing the TRITON N : C : P Ratio. They can be used to aid corals against bacterial types of rapid tissue necrosis.

These products work to create an environment within the aquarium that shock the bacteria attacking the affected coral while, at the same time, providing specific elements that help to fortify the coral that is under attack. The shocking affect of this product is achieved by an intensive “in tank” bath which means that the infected coral does not need to be removed from the aquarium. A solution is prepared using the aquarium water in conjunction with either RTN-X or STN-X and after 20 minutes is ready for application. Minimize or stop water flow around the affected coral for maximum efficacy. If nutrient amounts are known, ideally through N-DOC testing, a very effective ratio adjustment can be administered prior to the intensive bath. Use our online calculator for optimal treatment information.

These products cannot prevent further deterioration of affected corals if the underlying stressors are not identified and addressed but will acutely treat the bacteria causing tissue necrosis.

Ideally used in conjunction with TRITON N-DOC lab tests to accurately dial in the dose rate, there is also a generic dose rate if exact water parameters are not available.

RTN-X and STN-X do not contain any from of antibiotic or aggressive heavy metals and are safe to use with any reef system.

Both products were designed in Australia and produced in Germany.

Rtnx Stnx release.png
 
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ScottR

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I’ve had RTN happen so fast. I’d assume that any time you put a frag in, you'd throw in RTN-X? Just as an assurance? And STN-X would be used if you’re seeing tissue recession?
 

GlassMunky

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Could you share a little more about exactly how one is to administer this "in tank bath"?
Seems interesting and if it can help stop STN/RTN sounds like a great product
 
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Julian@Triton

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Could you share a little more about exactly how one is to administer this "in tank bath"?
Seems interesting and if it can help stop STN/RTN sounds like a great product
If the coral is at the surface then just pour the solution directly onto the colony. If the coral or the area affected is deeper in your aquarium then probably best to use a large syringe to deliver the treatment directly to the site of the infection.
 

Gogi

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Sounds like completely disengaging flow and letting the water settle down would be a good idea. I don't see any solution interacting much with coral tissue in typical sps flow :rolleyes: I mean that's the whole point, we're trying to prevent water from being still around polyps.
 
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Julian@Triton

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Sounds like completely disengaging flow and letting the water settle down would be a good idea. I don't see any solution interacting much with coral tissue in typical sps flow :rolleyes: I mean that's the whole point, we're trying to prevent water from being still around polyps.
Correct and good point. My bad as this was assumed but should be clearly stated to ensure greater contact time with the infected area. Minimizing or cutting off flow around the coral will greatly increase the efficacy of treatment. I will add this to the post above.
 
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Wrasse-cal

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would you provide a bit more information about what exactly are in these products? While I appreciate some specific details are necessary trade secrets, I am not a fan of dumping unknown solutions in my aquarium.
 

Gogi

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would you provide a bit more information about what exactly are in these products? While I appreciate some specific details are necessary trade secrets, I am not a fan of dumping unknown solutions in my aquarium.
Good luck :D

This seems to go along the same branding as Cya-NO. All three focused on inhibiting bacteria.
 

K7BMG

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Looks like its a informational release here in the US before the product release.
 

Variant

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These products cannot prevent further deterioration of affected corals if the underlying stressors are not identified and addressed but will acutely treat the bacteria causing tissue necrosis.
Does this mean you guys have identified the specific bacteria(s) that cause tissue necrosis?

These products work to create an environment within the aquarium that shock the bacteria attacking the affected coral
What do you mean shock? If it's not killed by the solutions, does this mean it's only a temporary relief for the stn/rtn-ing coral while the solution is dumped on the coral, but goes away as soon as you turn on the flow in your tank again?

at the same time, providing specific elements that help to fortify the coral that is under attack
Is this the same effect that KZ's flatworm stop product has on acropora in that it encourages acropora to have more slime coating and therefore becomes a bit more "resistant" to irritants?
 

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