Tell me about your Morays… especially they’re aggression with tank mates

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Auquanut

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I've skimmed through the last three pages and didn't see anything about zebra eels. May have missed it. Through my research, it seems they tend to be more docile than most, and while they get large, they might be more adaptable to a community tank. Does anyone have any good or bad experience with these guys?
 
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flagg37

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I've skimmed through the last three pages and didn't see anything about zebra eels. May have missed it. Through my research, it seems they tend to be more docile than most, and while they get large, they might be more adaptable to a community tank. Does anyone have any good or bad experience with these guys?
I was thinking the same thing. Mine was a model citizen. Never went for my fish, shrimp, urchin, or any other tank mates. He was a bit seclusive though.

 

flagg37

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I found this video too. It’s not the best quality but it shows me feeding it. Also you can see my cardinal and mandarin; each are the size he could eat if he was interested.

 
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I found this video too. It’s not the best quality but it shows me feeding it. Also you can see my cardinal and mandarin; each are the size he could eat if he was interested.

Sooo cool! Your kinda talking me into it.
 

Matrig

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My Snowflake is quite peaceful. Just hangs out in its rock cavern most of the time. Can be a bit feisty during feeding and doesn’t intentionally attack the others but will sometimes grab my porky when going for the same piece of meat.
It doesn’t mind the odd pat too. Will come up to my hands when in the tanks and I’ll give it a rub on the side.
I do have a couple of fish it could take but they are wary enough to keep distance. I have had a few small clowns “disappear” but there are other suspects it could be.
 
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I currently have two morays. I have a snowflake about 15 inches long and an indian mud moray about 20 inches long. The snowflake is the perfect moray, similar to a zebra. Takes food from tongs easily and never gives a fish a second glance. The mud moray is a heat seeking missile to food. Very very aggressive eater. And as with all eels, they cant see that well, and it has bitten a trigger that was trying to steal the food. No serious injury, but total 180 in feeding aggression verus a snowflake.
 
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I found this video too. It’s not the best quality but it shows me feeding it. Also you can see my cardinal and mandarin; each are the size he could eat if he was interested.


he’s so cool! There is one at my LFS I’m pretty tempted by lol

for whatever reason my Yellow head isn’t interested in raw shrimp at all, I’m trying to just feed him seafood for humans, silversides are the only thing he really went crazy for coming right at me as soon as it hit the water

I cut up some raw salmon and he reluctantly ate it after I rubbed it on his nose so I’m guna give home more after acouple days, may try squid next
 

Steve and his Animals

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he’s so cool! There is one at my LFS I’m pretty tempted by lol

for whatever reason my Yellow head isn’t interested in raw shrimp at all, I’m trying to just feed him seafood for humans, silversides are the only thing he really went crazy for coming right at me as soon as it hit the water

I cut up some raw salmon and he reluctantly ate it after I rubbed it on his nose so I’m guna give home more after acouple days, may try squid next
Tilapia is usually more palatable to many predators, and it's cheaper than salmon at least. My fangtooth morays loved squid.
 
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A fish eater will eat your fish.

Well what do you know :/

woke up to my yellow-head with a swollen belly full of my female square back Anthias which I struggle to believe he fit down his throat and for good measure he took a chunk out of the Males belly

I super appreciate all the advice given here even though I did the exact opposite
 

lion king

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Tilapia is usually more palatable to many predators, and it's cheaper than salmon at least. My fangtooth morays loved squid.

Tilapia is really lacking in the nutritional values eels will need for long term success. Fat profile is all wrong, lacking in efa's, as well as lacking in B vitamins, especially B1 as well as vitamin e, all which are very important.

I just read an article about grunts being part of the lionfish diet in the Atlantic, so if you have grunts available where you are, they may be worth a try. They are not available where I am. Salmon really is the best fish that's widely available, they need a fatty fish. I used to also feed tuna until it became $20/lb plus.

Yellowheads are fish eaters, while they may eat some crustaceans, in the wild it would be very minimal, and in captivity should be sparingly. While mussels also wouldn't be their choice in the wild, they are very high in B1, which B1 deficiency is a main culprit is an early demise. Squid and octopus may also be offered occasionally, some eels go mad for these.

Well apparently Hikari has changed the fish species they used for their silversides, so I can no longer recommend them. Here's an article to help you choose, if you decide to use silversides.
https://reefs.com/brief-word-silversides/
 
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Steve and his Animals

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Well what do you know :/

woke up to my yellow-head with a swollen belly full of my female square back Anthias which I struggle to believe he fit down his throat and for good measure he took a chunk out of the Males belly

I super appreciate all the advice given here even though I did the exact opposite
Goes back to one of my first lessons for new eel keepers that I mentioned earlier: learn to appreciate how wide they can open their mouths, then add some more to your expectations for good measure. We all learn the hard way sometimes.
 

Steve and his Animals

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Tilapia is really lacking in the nutritional values eels will need for long term success. Fat profile is all wrong, lacking in efa's, as well as lacking in B vitamins, especially B1 as well as vitamin e, all which are very important.

I just read an article about grunts being part of the lionfish diet in the Atlantic, so if you have grunts available where you are, they may be worth a try. They are not available where I am. Salmon really is the best fish that's widely available, they need a fatty fish. I used to also feed tuna until it became $20/lb plus.

Yellowheads are fish eaters, while they may eat some crustaceans, in the wild it would be very minimal, and in captivity should be sparingly. While mussels also wouldn't be their choice in the wild, they are very high in B1, which B1 deficiency is a main culprit is an early demise. Squid and octopus may also be offered occasionally, some eels go mad for these.

Well apparently Hikari has changed the fish species they used for their silversides, so I can no longer recommend them. Here's an article to help you choose, if you decide to use silversides.
https://reefs.com/brief-word-silversides/
Even if the other brands don't sell true silversides, does that make them less nutritious? Are any of these fish species high in thiaminase?
 
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lion king

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Even if the other brands don't sell true silversides, does that make them less nutritious? Are any of these fish species high in thiaminase?
Smelt and anchovy do and apparently Hikari now uses a smelt, I'm not familiar with icefish. So with the info in that article, the San Francisco Bay Brands is the only one that does not contain thiaminese. Some thiaminese is going to be inevitable, but it's about balance. Many will dominant their predator's diet with silversides, shrimp, and krill; all containing a good amount of thiaminese, and then not supplying enough B1.
 

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