The relationship between fungi and coral

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TheGreenReefer

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Hello,
I recently have started to learn a bit of mycology and the incredible relationship between the plants and fungi. now we know there's a symbiotic relationship between the coral and its zooxanthellae, and with the new introduction to dna sequencing we are on the cusp of learning more about the balance and diversity of bacteria for a healthy reef tank. Maybe one day we start dosing fungal species that play an important role to aid coral health/disease prevention/more efficient transfer of nutrients between the coral and its zooxanthellae... I read a study that really sparked my interest. Part of me wants to start swabbing coral and seeing what I find on some agar plates.

I would love to here peoples thoughts on this.

"Eleven fungal OTUs, spanning two phyla and four classes were found in 90% of coral holobionts, and four of these were found in all samples. These fungi are the likeliest candidates for an ecologically significant association and/or coevolution with the A. hyacinthus holobiont. Detecting the limits of the geographical distribution and the host phylogenetic breadth of these associates in other natural coral systems will aid in understanding the drivers of coral fungal community composition."(Amend, A., Barshis, D. & Oliver, T. Coral-associated marine fungi form novel lineages and heterogeneous assemblages. ISME J 6, 1291–1301 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2011.193)

 
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Fascinating, isn't it? More so when one considers that not too long ago we only knew that coral had symbiotic dinoflagellates.

Looks like we are still at the stage of identifying and categorizing the individual coral holobiont players. The next step thereafter would be to properly understand all the various members' roles and how their interactions affect the symbiosis as a whole.

I think we'll see some really interesting developments in the next couple years as research moves forward.
 

austibella

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Hello,
I recently have started to learn a bit of mycology and the incredible relationship between the plants and fungi. now we know there's a symbiotic relationship between the coral and its zooxanthellae, and with the new introduction to dna sequencing we are on the cusp of learning more about the balance and diversity of bacteria for a healthy reef tank. Maybe one day we start dosing fungal species that play an important role to aid coral health/disease prevention/more efficient transfer of nutrients between the coral and its zooxanthellae... I read a study that really sparked my interest. Part of me wants to start swabbing coral and seeing what I find on some agar plates.

I would love to here peoples thoughts on this.

"Eleven fungal OTUs, spanning two phyla and four classes were found in 90% of coral holobionts, and four of these were found in all samples. These fungi are the likeliest candidates for an ecologically significant association and/or coevolution with the A. hyacinthus holobiont. Detecting the limits of the geographical distribution and the host phylogenetic breadth of these associates in other natural coral systems will aid in understanding the drivers of coral fungal community composition."(Amend, A., Barshis, D. & Oliver, T. Coral-associated marine fungi form novel lineages and heterogeneous assemblages. ISME J 6, 1291–1301 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2011.193)

What a great article. I am very into plants. And of course my reef tank. I collected exotic plants from all over the world for 30 yrs even before the internet. and really getting into fungi and how All our answers and cures are in fungi. It's The oldest living organisms connecting everything on earth and under our soil. earth cannot survive without fungi.I would love to get more info on fungi and corals.you have sparked my interest!! T.y
 
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TheGreenReefer

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What a great article. I am very into plants. And of course my reef tank. I collected exotic plants from all over the world for 30 yrs even before the internet. and really getting into fungi and how All our answers and cures are in fungi. It's The oldest living organisms connecting everything on earth and under our soil. earth cannot survive without fungi.I would love to get more info on fungi and corals.you have sparked my interest!! T.y
Who knows, our corals/reef tanks probably wouldn't survive without fungi either. It's so fascinating to learn about, I only started growing and foraging for mushrooms 6 months ago, and I'm amazed by this world hidden in plain site. And the compounds that these fungi can produce have mind blowing abilities to benefit humans in so many ways. I cant wait to learn more about this

Fascinating, isn't it? More so when one considers that not too long ago we only knew that coral had symbiotic dinoflagellates.

Looks like we are still at the stage of identifying and categorizing the individual coral holobiont players. The next step thereafter would be to properly understand all the various members' roles and how their interactions affect the symbiosis as a whole.

I think we'll see some really interesting developments in the next couple years as research moves forward.
absolutely! I look forward to the next generation of reefing and the information it will bring.
 

austibella

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Who knows, our corals/reef tanks probably wouldn't survive without fungi either. It's so fascinating to learn about, I only started growing and foraging for mushrooms 6 months ago, and I'm amazed by this world hidden in plain site. And the compounds that these fungi can produce have mind blowing abilities to benefit humans in so many ways. I cant wait to learn more about this


absolutely! I look forward to the next generation of reefing and the information it will bring.
You have opened my eyes to the world of fungi and corals. I never thought about it but I always felt trying to replicate mother nature in my 180 gal reef tank that at times I was screwing up when I would loose a coral, that I failed the corals I was supposed to protect. I know alot about plants and fungi and good bacteria in our soil and how global warming ,the sun is so hot here in Florida is literally turning my black soil into sand I believe it's killing the good bacteria and fungi in our soil which will turn it into sand I have never seen sand in my yard all these years until the last 2 yrs it was black and filled with worms. Now my worms are dissappearing the eco system is being destroyed, by the suns heat.. so i am adding more organic black cow manure and mulch from trees to my yard to feed the bacteria thus feeding the worms and fungi. So the same thing is happening to our ocean's from pollution, and the suns heat killing coral and fish. Getting back to our reef tanks, now that you sparked my interest of fungi and coral now it makes sense why we have problems growing coral and fighting algae and bacteria . We are doing everything to make our tanks look the best plus adding way to many chemicals and or adding bacteria not knowing really how much is to much and every kind of processed foods that really have no use in a tank and pollutes the water, , ( thats why I cut up my own variety fish for food) getting away from processed foods. It all makes sense if you destroy fungi ( the oldest living organisms) either on earth or in the ocean or in our tanks you destroy the eco system thus causing catastrophe. If science can figure out fungi in corals and we can add it to our tanks our reefs would take care of themselves by the help of fungi. It would change reefing forever. how great would that be
 
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Nano sapiens

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Getting back to our reef tanks, now that you sparked my interest of fungi and coral now it makes sense why we have problems growing coral and fighting algae and bacteria . We are doing everything to make our tanks look the best plus adding way to many chemicals and or adding bacteria not knowing really how much is to much and every kind of processed foods that really have no use in a tank and pollutes the water, , ( thats why I cut up my own variety fish for food) getting away from processed foods. It all makes sense if you destroy fungi ( the oldest living organisms) either on earth or in the ocean or in our tanks you destroy the eco system thus causing catastrophe. If science can figure out fungi in corals and we can add it to our tanks our reefs would take care of themselves by the help of fungi. It would change reefing forever. how great would that be

Without going into detail, you are on the right track for both terrestrial and aquatic environments.

I've been reef keeping for over 35 years now and the number one thing I'll always ask myself before attempting to fix anything is 'what is the most natural and least invasive/destructive way of dealing with the issue' (especially if it involves the adding of chemicals). I'm especially mindful of how my actions might impact the microbial life and I can say that I have never had to resort to using any of the commercial 'quick fixes' (nearly all reef keeping issues, if not gross ones that are self-inflicted, can be dealt with given patience and knowledge.

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Fascinating, isn't it? More so when one considers that not too long ago we only knew that coral had symbiotic dinoflagellates.

Looks like we are still at the stage of identifying and categorizing the individual coral holobiont players. The next step thereafter would be to properly understand all the various members' roles and how their interactions affect the symbiosis as a whole.

I think we'll see some really interesting developments in the next couple years as research moves forward.
Agreed!
 

Nano sapiens

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Some folks use anti fungals in there tanks, a mistake maybe?

Doing anything that disrupts the fine balance of the coral holobiont is risky at best, disastrous at worst. On top of that, we may find that fungi perform other vital functions in the reef aquarium that we currently know little to nothing about.
 
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austibella

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If you want to see an excellent documentary on fungi watch Fantastic Fungi on netflix. It is mind blowing..I know when I got biopsis. In my tank which after 10 yrs I have no idea where it came from I battled it for a year. Nothing will eat itso I heard about reef flux and used it.it did clear up didnt loose any coral, did a 70 gallon water change after 14 days. Few weeks later it came back with a vengeance. So I did another treatment lost 9 huge coral colonies and a huge anemone. My big tomato clown looked lost and mad and started going after other fish with aggressively. Now im thinking maybe I destroyed the fungi living withing the live rock and coral . Fungi lives like a web of information connecting everything to survive. To this day I am fighting biopsies and no matter what I do my ph, and alkalinity will not stay stable. Now on the flip side I have 10 tuxedo urchin in my tank for many years. I noticed 2 days ago they are all in a line on a rock in a row chowing on my biopsies starting to clean up the rock its like they all thought in numbers they can fix it, where before they never touched biopsies. It just shows how wonderful nature is to continually changing to survive . Everything is connected in nature even in our tanks.i am now rethinking reefing.. t.y. Greenreefer for starting this thread
 
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If you want to see an excellent documentary on fungi watch Fantastic Fungi on netflix. It is mind blowing..I know when I got biopsis. In my tank which after 10 yrs I have no idea where it came from I battled it for a year. Nothing will eat itso I heard about reef flux and used it.it did clear up didnt loose any coral, did a 70 gallon water change after 14 days. Few weeks later it came back with a vengeance. So I did another treatment lost 9 huge coral colonies and a huge anemone. My big tomato clown looked lost and mad and started going after other fish with aggressively. Now im thinking maybe I destroyed the fungi living withing the live rock and coral . Fungi lives like a web of information connecting everything to survive. To this day I am fighting biopsies and no matter what I do my ph, and alkalinity will not stay stable. Now on the flip side I have 10 tuxedo urchin in my tank for many years. I noticed 2 days ago they are all in a line on a rock in a row chowing on my biopsies starting to clean up the rock its like they all thought in numbers they can fix it, where before they never touched biopsies. It just shows how wonderful nature is to continually changing to survive . Everything is connected in nature even in our tanks.i am now rethinking reefing.. t.y. Greenreefer for starting this thread
That was a great documentary, I watched it twice! I had a similar experience with reef flux. It really destroyed the bacterial and fungal populations in my reef. Took quite a while to fix. Im really excited to dive into more research on this. There is a whole relationship between fungi, bacterial, algae, protists, and corals that few people know about. Maybe the people who make bottled bacteria can look more into it and make a product that creates a fungal diversity that benefits corals, bacteria, and algae. I'm happy I'm not alone in this now!
 
BRS

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