Thinking of doing as big as a water "swap" as possible

BRS

ScubaSkeets

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Hi folks!
For context, see my post here:

Thread 'Corals struggling. At a loss as to why?' https://www.reef2reef.com/threads/corals-struggling-at-a-loss-as-to-why.823160/

It started as a FOWLR tank back in September 2020, using IO Salt. When I was ready to start adding corals, I started doing 15-20% water changes, first with IO Reef Crystal's, but then changed to Red Sea Coral Pro. Why Red Sea Coral Pro when the alkalinity on it is too high? Because my wife has been using it on her tank and her corals are doing absolutely amazing.
Last week, I did a 32G water change (its a 54G tank and 20G sump) using RS Coral Pro. Still the corals are not doing well at all. I've asked several LFSs and they do not know what's wrong. The fish are doing great...just not the corals.
LFS tested my water yesterday and except for the salinity, which was at 1.023ish, everything else was good.

I do not know what else to do, so I'm thinking of doing a total water change, leaving only a few inches for the fish and changing 100% (less the remaining water) and putting new RS Coral Pro in.
Doing the 15-20% water changes that I have been doing doesn't seem to be working.

What say you?
Thanks!
 

IslandLifeReef

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There is a lot to decipher here. What kind of corals are we talking about? What was the dKh before you switched salts? How long ago did you switch? What is the dKh now? What are the nutrient levels in the tank?

Just because one tank works well with a certain salt brand doesn't mean that switching to that salt will make your tank look the same. If this was a recent change, constantly changing water will not solve your problem. The corals may just be mad at the sudden change in environment. Give us more info before you do any more water changes.
 
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There is a lot to decipher here. What kind of corals are we talking about? What was the dKh before you switched salts? How long ago did you switch? What is the dKh now? What are the nutrient levels in the tank?

Just because one tank works well with a certain salt brand doesn't mean that switching to that salt will make your tank look the same. If this was a recent change, constantly changing water will not solve your problem. The corals may just be mad at the sudden change in environment. Give us more info before you do any more water changes.
Thanks for the reply. All the details of the tank is on the context link, here:

I did not check the alkalinity before switching salts, but as of yesterday, the LFS measured it at 9.0 dkH.
 

jsker

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Your system is still cycling, and will be cycling every time you make a change. I would suggest to slow down, for example make a change and wait at least 2 weeks before you try some thing else.

From reading your other thread that you linked, your nitrates are fine between the 3 and 5. You do need phosphates around a .02. Feed, Feed, so that the fish will poop to help feed the corals.

In simple terms, your corals are starving and stressed. Slow down and feed :)
 
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ScubaSkeets

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Your system is still cycling, and will be cycling every time you make a change. I would suggest to slow down, for example make a change and wait at least 2 weeks before you try some thing else.

From reading your other thread that you linked, your nitrates are fine between the 3 and 5. You do need phosphates around a .02. Feed, Feed, so that the fish will poop to help feed the corals.

In simple terms, your corals are starving and stressed. Slow down and feed :)
Thanks. I forgot to say that the LFS measured the phosphates yesterday at .03. And Magnesium at 1275.
I feed like crazy! (At least I think I do) LFS Fish Frenzy, Mysis, Spirulina, and chopped up frozen clams. I also dose Red Sea Complete Coral Nutrition every few days, and Reef Roids on occasion.
 

IslandLifeReef

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Thanks. I forgot to say that the LFS measured the phosphates yesterday at .03. And Magnesium at 1275.
I feed like crazy! (At least I think I do) LFS Fish Frenzy, Mysis, Spirulina, and chopped up frozen clams. I also dose Red Sea Complete Coral Nutrition every few days, and Reef Roids on occasion.

I agree with @jsker, slow down. Looking at the thread you linked, I see a lot of algae on those rocks. Your Alk is probably too high for your NO3 and PO4. You need to pick a plan and stick with it for months before you start to tweak things. Your tank hasn’t had a chance to find it’s rhythm yet.
 

Bruce Burnett

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I am no expert but I tell people if you have no pest in your tank do a hands off approach for a few months including skipping water changes. Just do regular maintenance like clean glass and skimmer, check water parameters but you don't adjust until you see a trend. People are to quick to mess with parameters or adjusting their lights. This does not mean if you find something way off that you do nothing, it means you slow down. Yes people can set a tank up and have it full of corals quickly but that is for the experienced. For fairly new people around 6 months to try easy corals. Maybe have a full tank around a year.
 
MotorCityCorals

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Stability is the key to success. Corals are pretty versatile as to what parameters they can flourish in, as long as those numbers stay stabile. Phosphates can be as high a 4.0+ with no algae issues and beautiful coral color and health as long as you have the right filtration to maintain high phosphates for coral nutrition without feeding just nuisance algae. You seem to be constantly adding different things chasing either numbers or corals appearance, without ever letting the tank settle out on it's own.

And while you are testing basic water parameters, your aren't testing all the variables. And ICP test could reveal if you have something leeching from your live rock, or even a cheap Chinese pump with a impeller shaft rusting into your water.

But whatever your issue is, I guarantee it's not going to go away by pouring your water down the drain and putting fresh water into the tank. You don't know what it is you are trying to get rid of you. You have to figure out what the problem is before throwing random solutions at it.

Dave B
 
BRS

WHAT WATER CHANGE "PERCENTAGE" MAKES IT WORTH DOING?

  • 5% - 10%

    Votes: 77 9.7%
  • 10% - 20%

    Votes: 407 51.5%
  • 20% - 30%

    Votes: 187 23.6%
  • 30% - 40%

    Votes: 25 3.2%
  • 40% - 50%

    Votes: 18 2.3%
  • 50% or more

    Votes: 8 1.0%
  • No water change is worth it

    Votes: 32 4.0%
  • Not sure

    Votes: 14 1.8%
  • Other (please explain in the thread)

    Votes: 23 2.9%
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