Three Wrasses in a 65? Seems like a lot, could use some thoughts

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i cant think

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Here’s a photo of the naoko under a heavy white light, some blues were coming in in the photo which doesn’t help the white. He absolutely loves playing in the flow so it’ll be a funny one to watch him swim in my 4’ tank.
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cdw79

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You mention the Naoko's needs decent amount of space to display that behavior- would my system at 3 feet or so be sufficient for it to be fully settled? I have a good amount of rock in my scape but lots of flow. Just want to be sure it would do well in my tank and not have any space issues.

Also interesting that the mirror approach wasn't effective, the whole process of getting these fish to color up is so interesting to me. Hopefully whatever I get will flash at my leopard wrasse or something and be able to replicate some of those beautiful colors I've seen!
 

i cant think

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You mention the Naoko's needs decent amount of space to display that behavior- would my system at 3 feet or so be sufficient for it to be fully settled? I have a good amount of rock in my scape but lots of flow. Just want to be sure it would do well in my tank and not have any space issues.

Also interesting that the mirror approach wasn't effective, the whole process of getting these fish to color up is so interesting to me. Hopefully whatever I get will flash at my leopard wrasse or something and be able to replicate some of those beautiful colors I've seen!
I caught mine “Divebombing” my Pinkstreak now that I think about it… The pinkstreak was unfazed though and he didn’t really care. As for enough space, 3’ or 4’ is perfect IMHO, it’s recommended they need 4’ but that’s just because they’re written as aggressive, I have found they’re no more aggressive than a kwazulu or Sea Fighter (Cirrhilabrus rubriventralis) both of which are in the same complex. That complex (Rubriventralis) consists of the wrasses with elongated pelvic fins.
Of course as I say I’ve rarely caught mine flashing I turn around and catch him displaying at the return (This guy has no brain I swear…).
 

i cant think

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Great to hear! Besides McCosker's and Carpenter's (which always seem to be quite muted looking despite some beautiful pictures I've seen), what are other smaller flasher options? Figured getting all my options sorted before making the final choice
Most flashers will always look dull looking unless given a reason to flash (This is why I will stick to Cirrhilabrus as they stay nice and vibrant even if they’re heavily green - IMHO the simpler the pattern the more attractive the fish is). I saw a beautiful specimen of the mccoskers however passed on it unfortunately, that was the only time I ever contemplated a flasher in my collection, it was an African mccosker but had the beautiful electric blue on the back of his dorsal fin, I’d recommend waiting if you were to go with a flasher as some of the sweet ones you see will come in but it will be a while.
As for other flasher options you do have Paracheilinus flavianalis which is very similar to the Mccoskers and Carpenters but as a result of that can also be rather dull looking and orange with the yellow anal fin.
 

JCM

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Yes, you did ask me about the Madagascar but I did tell you that I do not recommend any flasher wrasse for a 3’ tank due to the propensity for spinal injury. I think it’s great that you’re doing your due diligence, but sometimes people are going to tell you want they think you want to hear to make a sale and not every hobbyist giving you advice has actually kept these species.

Old thread I know, but I found this interesting. You don't recommend any flasher in a 3' tank? Due to spinal injuries? I'd love to read more if you have any links or anything. I've kept 2 McCosker's and a Carpenters in 3' tanks long term (5+ years each) without issue. Did I get lucky or are these just smaller varieties that aren't as susceptible to that specific injury?

I recently got a P. cyaneus for my 3' tank, I guess I need to watch out for it getting injured. My M. meleagris postured towards it the first couple days but that's stopped fortunately.
 

SaltyT

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Old thread I know, but I found this interesting. You don't recommend any flasher in a 3' tank? Due to spinal injuries? I'd love to read more if you have any links or anything. I've kept 2 McCosker's and a Carpenters in 3' tanks long term (5+ years each) without issue. Did I get lucky or are these just smaller varieties that aren't as susceptible to that specific injury?

I recently got a P. cyaneus for my 3' tank, I guess I need to watch out for it getting injured. My M. meleagris postured towards it the first couple days but that's stopped fortunately.
The fact that you’ve kept more than one flasher wrasse for over 5 years is impressive. Most flashers only live about 4.
 

JCM

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The fact that you’ve kept more than one flasher wrasse for over 5 years is impressive. Most flashers only live about 4.

The estimates I've seen are all over the place, from 4 to 10 years. Not sure any of those are definitive. I don't recall any of them making it much past 6 so maybe that's about right. I dont have dates written down though, that's just off the top of my head. Halichoeres, Macropharyngodon, and Cirrhilabrus have all been longer lived for me.

Not sure I've heard much about spinal injuries (though I don't doubt it, they get wild when strutting their stuff), I'm interested to read more.
 
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