Three Wrasses in a 65? Seems like a lot, could use some thoughts

i cant think

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Here’s a photo of the naoko under a heavy white light, some blues were coming in in the photo which doesn’t help the white. He absolutely loves playing in the flow so it’ll be a funny one to watch him swim in my 4’ tank.
image.jpg
 
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cdw79

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You mention the Naoko's needs decent amount of space to display that behavior- would my system at 3 feet or so be sufficient for it to be fully settled? I have a good amount of rock in my scape but lots of flow. Just want to be sure it would do well in my tank and not have any space issues.

Also interesting that the mirror approach wasn't effective, the whole process of getting these fish to color up is so interesting to me. Hopefully whatever I get will flash at my leopard wrasse or something and be able to replicate some of those beautiful colors I've seen!
 

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You mention the Naoko's needs decent amount of space to display that behavior- would my system at 3 feet or so be sufficient for it to be fully settled? I have a good amount of rock in my scape but lots of flow. Just want to be sure it would do well in my tank and not have any space issues.

Also interesting that the mirror approach wasn't effective, the whole process of getting these fish to color up is so interesting to me. Hopefully whatever I get will flash at my leopard wrasse or something and be able to replicate some of those beautiful colors I've seen!
I caught mine “Divebombing” my Pinkstreak now that I think about it… The pinkstreak was unfazed though and he didn’t really care. As for enough space, 3’ or 4’ is perfect IMHO, it’s recommended they need 4’ but that’s just because they’re written as aggressive, I have found they’re no more aggressive than a kwazulu or Sea Fighter (Cirrhilabrus rubriventralis) both of which are in the same complex. That complex (Rubriventralis) consists of the wrasses with elongated pelvic fins.
Of course as I say I’ve rarely caught mine flashing I turn around and catch him displaying at the return (This guy has no brain I swear…).
 
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Great to hear! Besides McCosker's and Carpenter's (which always seem to be quite muted looking despite some beautiful pictures I've seen), what are other smaller flasher options? Figured getting all my options sorted before making the final choice
 

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Great to hear! Besides McCosker's and Carpenter's (which always seem to be quite muted looking despite some beautiful pictures I've seen), what are other smaller flasher options? Figured getting all my options sorted before making the final choice
Most flashers will always look dull looking unless given a reason to flash (This is why I will stick to Cirrhilabrus as they stay nice and vibrant even if they’re heavily green - IMHO the simpler the pattern the more attractive the fish is). I saw a beautiful specimen of the mccoskers however passed on it unfortunately, that was the only time I ever contemplated a flasher in my collection, it was an African mccosker but had the beautiful electric blue on the back of his dorsal fin, I’d recommend waiting if you were to go with a flasher as some of the sweet ones you see will come in but it will be a while.
As for other flasher options you do have Paracheilinus flavianalis which is very similar to the Mccoskers and Carpenters but as a result of that can also be rather dull looking and orange with the yellow anal fin.
 

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Yes, you did ask me about the Madagascar but I did tell you that I do not recommend any flasher wrasse for a 3’ tank due to the propensity for spinal injury. I think it’s great that you’re doing your due diligence, but sometimes people are going to tell you want they think you want to hear to make a sale and not every hobbyist giving you advice has actually kept these species.

Old thread I know, but I found this interesting. You don't recommend any flasher in a 3' tank? Due to spinal injuries? I'd love to read more if you have any links or anything. I've kept 2 McCosker's and a Carpenters in 3' tanks long term (5+ years each) without issue. Did I get lucky or are these just smaller varieties that aren't as susceptible to that specific injury?

I recently got a P. cyaneus for my 3' tank, I guess I need to watch out for it getting injured. My M. meleagris postured towards it the first couple days but that's stopped fortunately.
 
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Old thread I know, but I found this interesting. You don't recommend any flasher in a 3' tank? Due to spinal injuries? I'd love to read more if you have any links or anything. I've kept 2 McCosker's and a Carpenters in 3' tanks long term (5+ years each) without issue. Did I get lucky or are these just smaller varieties that aren't as susceptible to that specific injury?

I recently got a P. cyaneus for my 3' tank, I guess I need to watch out for it getting injured. My M. meleagris postured towards it the first couple days but that's stopped fortunately.
The fact that you’ve kept more than one flasher wrasse for over 5 years is impressive. Most flashers only live about 4.
 

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The fact that you’ve kept more than one flasher wrasse for over 5 years is impressive. Most flashers only live about 4.

The estimates I've seen are all over the place, from 4 to 10 years. Not sure any of those are definitive. I don't recall any of them making it much past 6 so maybe that's about right. I dont have dates written down though, that's just off the top of my head. Halichoeres, Macropharyngodon, and Cirrhilabrus have all been longer lived for me.

Not sure I've heard much about spinal injuries (though I don't doubt it, they get wild when strutting their stuff), I'm interested to read more.
 
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Hi all. I have the following stock list for my 65:

2 adult Ocellaris clowns
Adult Bangaii
Blue star leopard wrasse (female)
Yellow Assessor
Lyretail anthias (Small, captive-bred, female)
Longnose Hawkfish
Tiny Biota Mandarin
Lawnmower Blenny
Small Orangespotted shrimp goby

After months of going back and forth I planned to add a flasher wrasse on the smaller side (probably diamond tail if I can get one) as a bit of a centerpiece fish. Previously I had wanted a Labouti wrasse, but I was told they don't tend to look all that great under a more blue light spectrum so I started looking at there options.

Well today at the LFS they had a Labouti Wrasse in and it's gorgeous. Colors look great (albeit in white light), super active, and taking very well to QT. All great signs, and at a bargain price too compared to what I have seen healthy specimens going for. But I'm still really excited about the flasher. So I'm at a crossroads.

My mind immediately went to "can I keep both," (thinking maybe I remove the anthias when the flasher comes around) but my instinct was the answer would probably be no. The Labouti isn't a massive wrasse but is no small fish either, and though it's generally rated as around the 70 gallon mark for minimum tank size (give or take), it's still large for sure. I don't believe I would see any aggression issues based on that wrasse compatibility chart that I've seen floating around, but a leopard, fairy, and flasher wrasse all in a tank that I'd say is on the higher end of stocking makes me not so sure if it would be a good idea. As much as I do really want to take it.

So, thoughts? Thanks in advance
Labouti is not a wrasse for a 65 gal tank. Very aggressive and much larger than can be house in a 65 gal. Maybe a Lubbock or Exquisite are much better choice. I would get several flashers along with the Diamond tail Flasher.
 

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What is the dimension of your 65 gal tank. Wrasse display does in often go in a linear fashion but circular and up and down. They don't go gull force to the glass and break their spine, but often they jump straight up and hit structures in the hood.
My Naoko display very often. He runs both horizontal for a short distance and go up and down.
NaokoFairy2020040702.jpg
NaokoFairy2020041305.jpg
 

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If I want to put 3 wrasses in a 65 gal tank, I would put three of these guys. They are in the smallish fish, not agressive and pack stunning colors.

Exquisite Fairy
ExquisiteFairyWrasse2019052601.jpg


Lubbock Fairy
LubbockFairyB2019052801.jpg


McKosker Flasher
McCoskeri2018051801resized.jpg


Naoko Fairy
NaokoFairy2019092403.jpg


Attenuatus Flasher (Diamontail Flasher)
P attenuatus2020070401.jpg
 
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i cant think

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If I want to put 3 wrasses in a 65 gal tank, I would put three of these guys. They are in the smallish fish, not agressive and pack stunning colors.

Exquisite Fairy
ExquisiteFairyWrasse2019052601.jpg


Lubbock Fairy
LubbockFairyB2019052801.jpg


McKosker Flasher
McCoskeri2018051801resized.jpg


Naoko Fairy
NaokoFairy2019092403.jpg


Attenuatus Flasher (Diamontail Flasher)
P attenuatus2020070401.jpg
Whilst I agree with you on the Lubbocki, Exquisitus and Naokoae, I disagree with you on the other two. The Paracheilinus genus is highly active, ideally needing a 4’ tank long term. Yes a 65G tank will suffice short term however it is not a good long term choice as they tend to dash into objects in smaller tanks (3’ or less) once they mature and get to that displaying age.
 
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Flasher and Fairy wrasse display due to aggression, to deter aggression, then they display in courtship. I was fortunate enough to observed all three types of display. It is true that when they display for courtship, they require a lot of room, but these fish will not run into wall or structures when they display. IME, most of the case, the limiting factor for courtship display is the height and width of the tank, not so much the length. They don't really swim in straight line but circling around the female. I see if I can post some pictures.
In the series of pictures, you can see he loops around her, which is to be expect in a lot of the courtships in a lot of the fishes.
BTW, getting juveniles Flasher and Fairy are not easy. I would not attempt to pair them unless you have open spaces in your tank, Width of at least 30 inches or so. and at least 24 inches deep, relatively free of corals and rock.
My tank has really high flow. At times there is sand storm when the wavemaker hit it just right. Fish are really active when the flow pick up.

Here is picture of the courtship of my Eightline Flasher.
EightlineFlasher2019080101.jpg
EightlineFlasher2019080102.jpg
EightlineFlasher2019100901Female.jpg
EightlineFlasher2019111201.jpg



My Diamontail Flasher
P attenuatus2020061407.jpg
P attenuatus2020061408.jpg
P attenuatus2020062001.jpg
P attenuatus2020062002.jpg
P attenuatus2020062003.jpg
P attenuatus2020062005.jpg
P attenuatus2020062003.jpg
 
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