Utilitarian fish for a 29G biocube?

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aydemir

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EDIT: I want to do a mixed reef so only looking for reef safe fish! Also in addition to the fish I will grab standard CUC (hermits/snails)

I just got a used 29 gal biocube with a netting lid, am wondering what are some good fish to stock in there for algae and pest control.

I was thinking some sort of small blenny (tail spot?) and a hectors goby for the algae control. For the pest control I've heard so many conflicting things about wrasses - especially the 6 line - I am also considering a cleaner shrimp and/or peppermint shrimp. Any recommendations?
 
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Greybeard

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Obviously, the typical algae eaters, tangs and foxface, aren't going to work...

Lots of folks like lawnmower blennies in such a tank, but I've never had much luck with them.

Honestly, the best algae eating, small, reef safe fish I've ever seen are plain old mollies. Yeah, I don't really want them in my reef either, but they are very good algae eaters!

With such a small tank, I think I'd stick with snails. Nassarius for the sand bed, a mix of Nerite, Trochus, and Astraea for rock and glass, maybe a single Mexican turbo. Urchins will eat lots of algae, including the coraline algae you want to grow, so watch out for them... I'm not a hermit fan, but many folks would throw them in as well.
 
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aydemir

aydemir

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Obviously, the typical algae eaters, tangs and foxface, aren't going to work...

Lots of folks like lawnmower blennies in such a tank, but I've never had much luck with them.

Honestly, the best algae eating, small, reef safe fish I've ever seen are plain old mollies. Yeah, I don't really want them in my reef either, but they are very good algae eaters!

With such a small tank, I think I'd stick with snails. Nassarius for the sand bed, a mix of Nerite, Trochus, and Astraea for rock and glass, maybe a single Mexican turbo. Urchins will eat lots of algae, including the coraline algae you want to grow, so watch out for them... I'm not a hermit fan, but many folks would throw them in as well.
Oh yeah I love nassarius snails. Have you had turbos knock stuff over? I had a single turbo in a 10 gal and it bulldozed everything, had like 3 sps knocked over in one night it was super frustrating. I am currently on the fence if I will even have snails for this reason but am leaning towards having some of the smaller types (also open to recommendations on snails)
 
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aydemir

aydemir

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Obviously, the typical algae eaters, tangs and foxface, aren't going to work...

Lots of folks like lawnmower blennies in such a tank, but I've never had much luck with them.

Honestly, the best algae eating, small, reef safe fish I've ever seen are plain old mollies. Yeah, I don't really want them in my reef either, but they are very good algae eaters!

With such a small tank, I think I'd stick with snails. Nassarius for the sand bed, a mix of Nerite, Trochus, and Astraea for rock and glass, maybe a single Mexican turbo. Urchins will eat lots of algae, including the coraline algae you want to grow, so watch out for them... I'm not a hermit fan, but many folks would throw them in as well.
oh about the mollies - would they do best as a small school or is a single going to be okay?
 

Greybeard

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oh about the mollies - would they do best as a small school or is a single going to be okay?
Yup... Turbos can be bulldozers, but I like 'em :D. I like Conch too, fighting conch, usually, but in a nano, not so much.

Mollies: If I were wanting them in my reef, I'd probably pick up a trio or quartet of healthy freshies, and start the conversion process. It's not difficult, takes a little time. The plain (and cheap!) black ones are fairly attractive under reef lighting :D
 
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