Want to know a little brackish secret.

OP
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I don’t want people to be scared away from this that is why you don’t need to acclimate just one or very expensive ones. You could just get feeder guppies as an experiment and you don’t have to wait 6 weeks you just need to find out whether or not you suppliers guppies have a reputation for being rather hardy. And if you really dout the guppies then just try out some mollies their more resilient and much larger and defensive than a guppy. Mollies being bulkier and most of them bred off shore, this means that they could have already been born in salt/ brackish water. And mollies aren’t an ugly option you can ask you LFS to get some really beautiful mollies such as sailfins, or golden mollies. I got unlucky that both my LFS don’t sell mollies. But yeah mollies their acclimation is as easy as it gets. Just drip acclimate them for a few hours until the salinity of your tank matches the water the mollies are in. Note that the acclimation should be done in a separate container, and they should be in the water they came in. But all in all mollies are the safest options for a brackish fish in a reef tank. And as a perk they’re algae eating machines. And if you have a large enough tank they can reach a max size of 6 inches. Although this is very rare it can happen. And if you get the sailfin variation they will show off all day long. Here is a screen shot of one I got from google.

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Randy Holmes-Farley

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If you have any questions just type them down I really want to here your thoughts.
OK, you asked for thoughts. lol

My thought is that, just because you can do something, do you think that means you should?

IMO, keeping any fish outside of its normal environmental conditions is questionable.

Do you know that the fish are not constantly struggling to excrete salt? Do you know that they are not suffering?

If they could easily thrive in pure salt water, why would they not already be doing so in nature?

You would likely survive in a very high CO2 atmosphere, but that does not mean your life would be pleasant.
 
OP
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OK, you asked for thoughts. lol

My thought is that, just because you can do something, do you think that means you should?

IMO, keeping any fish outside of its normal environmental conditions is questionable.

Do you know that the fish are not constantly struggling to excrete salt? Do you know that they are not suffering?

If they could easily thrive in pure salt water, why would they not already be doing so in nature?

You would likely survive in a very high CO2 atmosphere, but that does not mean your life would be pleasant.
Though this is true. How do you also know that these fish aren’t farmed in saltwater. Mollies I can assure you that about 60% of them are bred off shore in saltwater/ brackish water. This is why we in California have a larger survival rate on mollies because our water is so hardy, just like the environment that the mollies are bred in. We in California have plenty of mollies but in places like Florida the mollies that come in usually die after a few weeks because of the mineral deficiency. I do agree that the guppies might be suffering in this new environment, but if we do this and we start breeding and selling them they will hopefully regain their original hardy ness. This way people in the future who want to try this don’t struggle so much.
 
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Randy Holmes-Farley

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Though this is true. How do you also know that these fish aren’t farmed in saltwater. Mollies I can assure you that about 60% of them are bred off shore in saltwater/ brackish water. This is why we in California have a larger survival rate on mollies because our water is so hardy, just like the environment that the mollies are bred in. We in California have plenty of mollies but in places like Florida the mollies that come in usually die after a few weeks because of the mineral deficiency. I do agree that the guppies might be suffering in this new environment, but if we do this and we start breeding and selling them they will hopefully regain their original hardy ness. This way people in the future who want to try this don’t struggle so much.
How does being farmed in saltwater change the concern? They might be farmed in vodka, but that doesn't make it OK.
 

clicfacil

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[QUOTE = "The guppy guru, post: 7251400, miembro: 144784"]
Aunque esto es cierto. ¿Cómo sabes también que estos peces no se cultivan en agua salada? Mollies Les puedo asegurar que alrededor del 60% de ellos se crían en alta mar en agua salada / salobre. Es por eso que en California tenemos una tasa de supervivencia más grande en los mollies porque nuestra agua es muy resistente, al igual que el medio ambiente en el que se crían los mollies. En California tenemos muchos mollies, pero en lugares como Florida, los mollies que entran generalmente mueren después de algunas semanas debido a la deficiencia mineral. Estoy de acuerdo en que los guppies podrían estar sufriendo en este nuevo entorno, pero si hacemos esto y comenzamos a criarlos y venderlos, con suerte recuperarán su resistencia original. De esta manera, las personas en el futuro que quieran probar esto no tendrán tantas dificultades.
[/CITAR]
De Verdad? Tenemos REEF no un pseudoREEF, ¿Quiénes somos para modificar la naturaleza?

Apenas podemos simular un espacio de arrecife... Sorry, but I do not agree
 

MombasaLionfish

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[QUOTE = "The guppy guru, post: 7251400, miembro: 144784"]
Aunque esto es cierto. ¿Cómo sabes también que estos peces no se cultivan en agua salada? Mollies Les puedo asegurar que alrededor del 60% de ellos se crían en alta mar en agua salada / salobre. Es por eso que en California tenemos una tasa de supervivencia más grande en los mollies porque nuestra agua es muy resistente, al igual que el medio ambiente en el que se crían los mollies. En California tenemos muchos mollies, pero en lugares como Florida, los mollies que entran generalmente mueren después de algunas semanas debido a la deficiencia mineral. Estoy de acuerdo en que los guppies podrían estar sufriendo en este nuevo entorno, pero si hacemos esto y comenzamos a criarlos y venderlos, con suerte recuperarán su resistencia original. De esta manera, las personas en el futuro que quieran probar esto no tendrán tantas dificultades.
[/CITAR]
De Verdad? Tenemos REEF no un pseudoREEF, ¿Quiénes somos para modificar la naturaleza?

Apenas podemos simular un espacio de arrecife... Sorry, but I do not agree
? English?
 
OP
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people mollies are better in saltwater because they are from saltwater they originated from saltwater and most wild mollies will be found in brackish waters same thing for guppies. So transitioning them isn’t cruel or bad for them we are just simulating their natural habitat. hope I could clear out some things.
 
OP
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I have to say that in my best attempts The reef dork didn’t really find this all that interesting and put us all aside. This got me disappointed but , I remembered about all of you! We can show the world what we can really do let us spread the word of these amazing animals to all corners of the Reef aquarium hobby.
 

justinhm

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I had some success acclimating 5 freshwater mollies to saltwater. I did a 16 hour drip (may have been excessive but it was an experiment I wanted to try) with a heater and airline to provide oxygen. Unfortunately, I had 2 of the mollies (a male and a female) disappear within the first 2 weeks, but the remaining 3 females have been going strong and are healthy. I've lost track of how long I've had them, maybe 4 or 5 months now, but two of the females are huge, and one of them just gave birth last week! :D
 
OP
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I had some success acclimating 5 freshwater mollies to saltwater. I did a 16 hour drip (may have been excessive but it was an experiment I wanted to try) with a heater and airline to provide oxygen. Unfortunately, I had 2 of the mollies (a male and a female) disappear within the first 2 weeks, but the remaining 3 females have been going strong and are healthy. I've lost track of how long I've had them, maybe 4 or 5 months now, but two of the females are huge, and one of them just gave birth last week! :D
Wow that’s awesome dude. I hope you stay successful for the rest of the hobby. I had a female and a male molly in my SPS dominated reef a few months ago and they had babies the babies didn’t last very long but, hey! At least it happened.
 
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