Why can you keep pipefish in warmer temperatures, but not seahorses?

ThePurple12

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They're both pretty much the same except for shape, so why do pipefish thrive in 80 degree water and not seahorses/why does vibrio affect seahorses much more than pipefish?

Is it because pipefish aren't captive-bred and come straight from the tropical ocean and seahorses, generally being captive-bred, have adapted to cooler temperatures?

Or maybe wild caught pipefish and seahorses just have stronger immune systems from being exposed to vibrio?

Anyone know?
 

Samina

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I may be wrong (happens sometimes!) but I always was under the assumption that pipefish and seahorses should be kept at cooler temps because vibrio becomes more virulent at temps above 74 degrees Fahrenheit.
Captive bred horses, more specifically H. erectus is one that is recommended to be at a cooler temp (think 72-76F). While others, such as H. kuda and H. reidi are usually found in warmer waters. So keeping them at higher temps (~78F) is better for them. From my understanding, pipefish follow the same type of recommendation. Dragon face are ok at an array of temps from cooler to warmer reef temps, while banded or Jann’s are more temperate and usually found in warmer tropical waters so they are recommended to be housed at warmer temps.
 

Thales

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They're both pretty much the same except for shape, so why do pipefish thrive in 80 degree water

Different species of both come from different places and different temps. It isn't a seahorse vs pipefish thing. I think there are people who recommend keeping ponies at lower temps because it can slow the metabolism of diseases and parasites, but I am not aware of anything that shows this to be the case.

and not seahorses/why does vibrio affect seahorses much more than pipefish?
I don't think it does. I think it may look that way because there are so many more ponies in tanks than pipefish. Though if it does, I would think it does because ponies are in contact with stuff via hitching than pipefish are.

Is it because pipefish aren't captive-bred and come straight from the tropical ocean and seahorses, generally being captive-bred, have adapted to cooler temperatures?
Nope. You can push some animals to cooler temps, but that range is variable and dependant on the animal. Some deep water fish do fine at warmer, but 'cool' reef temps, some don't. Catalina gobies don't seem to adapt well to reef temps.
 
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ThePurple12

ThePurple12

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Different species of both come from different places and different temps. It isn't a seahorse vs pipefish thing. I think there are people who recommend keeping ponies at lower temps because it can slow the metabolism of diseases and parasites, but I am not aware of anything that shows this to be the case.



I don't think it does. I think it may look that way because there are so many more ponies in tanks than pipefish. Though if it does, I would think it does because ponies are in contact with stuff via hitching than pipefish are.



Nope. You can push some animals to cooler temps, but that range is variable and dependant on the animal. Some deep water fish do fine at warmer, but 'cool' reef temps, some don't. Catalina gobies don't seem to adapt well to reef temps.
Thanks, that makes sense. What about immune systems of wild vs captive-bred?
 

Paulie069

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They're both pretty much the same except for shape, so why do pipefish thrive in 80 degree water and not seahorses/why does vibrio affect seahorses much more than pipefish?

Is it because pipefish aren't captive-bred and come straight from the tropical ocean and seahorses, generally being captive-bred, have adapted to cooler temperatures?

Or maybe wild caught pipefish and seahorses just have stronger immune systems from being exposed to vibrio?

Anyone know?
I keep my eretus in
I may be wrong (happens sometimes!) but I always was under the assumption that pipefish and seahorses should be kept at cooler temps because vibrio becomes more virulent at temps above 74 degrees Fahrenheit.
Captive bred horses, more specifically H. erectus is one that is recommended to be at a cooler temp (think 72-76F). While others, such as H. kuda and H. reidi are usually found in warmer waters. So keeping them at higher temps (~78F) is better for them. From my understanding, pipefish follow the same type of recommendation. Dragon face are ok at an array of temps from cooler to warmer reef temps, while banded or Jann’s are more temperate and usually found in warmer tropical waters so they are recommended to be housed at warmer temps.
i keep my erectus at 67 to 69 they all seem comfortable
 

Paul B

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This thread makes no sense. Both seahorses and pipefish come from tropical and temperate water. I collect both of them here in New York and they come from all tropical seas. It has nothing to do with Vibrio, immunity or anything else.
 

Js.Aqua.Project

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From what I have been taught, and learned through seahorse breeding projects, the temperature for the seahorses is not for the ponies themselves. It is to help control bacteria levels in the tank which the seahorses are sensitive to.

I have seen aquarists run their seahorse tanks at 80F with an oversized UV sterilizer and have no issues, while others will use a chiller and keep the tank sub-74 and have the same results.

To go on what @Paul B said, seahorses of the same specie are found in a wide ranges. H. erectus are commonly found off the coast of Florida and I had a friend find some in South Carolina, while collectors find them throughout the Caribbean.

Pipefish, while still a Syngnathidae, do not seem to be a susceptible to the bacteria levels commonly found in our reef tanks compared to the skin of the sea horses.
 
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ThePurple12

ThePurple12

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This thread makes no sense. Both seahorses and pipefish come from tropical and temperate water. I collect both of them here in New York and they come from all tropical seas. It has nothing to do with Vibrio, immunity or anything else.
Right, but I’m talking about aquariums. Pipefish seem to do well in tropical temperatures while seahorses die from vibrio.
 

Paul B

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I still don't see this thread making any sense. I know I am old, probably senile and have PTSD. But I keep pipefish for many years. I have a few now for a few years and they keep spawning.

I have also kept seahorses for many years. Tropical ones and the Erectus I collect here in New York.

(I have a patent on a seahorse feeder)

I must be doing something wrong because I have never (in 40 years of keeping them) had any of them get a bacterial infection or anything else.

I assume if they are, you are doing something wrong. But maybe it's just me.
Here is a pair I collected here. The female is transferring the eggs to the male. They grew up and spawned.

I just don't get these threads about fish getting sick.

I can see them getting sick if you quarantine them, make them listen to Rap music or medicate them, but then it is our fault.
I am going to eat some worms now because I just don't get it.

I am trying to use my new 3 D printer now and I also don't get that.

 

Paulie069

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From what I have been taught, and learned through seahorse breeding projects, the temperature for the seahorses is not for the ponies themselves. It is to help control bacteria levels in the tank which the seahorses are sensitive to.

I have seen aquarists run their seahorse tanks at 80F with an oversized UV sterilizer and have no issues, while others will use a chiller and keep the tank sub-74 and have the same results.

To go on what @Paul B said, seahorses of the same specie are found in a wide ranges. H. erectus are commonly found off the coast of Florida and I had a friend find some in South Carolina, while collectors find them throughout the Caribbean.

Pipefish, while still a Syngnathidae, do not seem to be a susceptible to the bacteria levels commonly found in our reef tanks compared to the skin of the sea horses.
I catch H Erectus in Jersey waters in all depths almost every time I go offshore, I have 22 myself and have given dozens to people who know what they are doing and love them as much as I do
 

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